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The Tutacachi Hands - Bolivia

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posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:05 PM
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The Tutacachi plateau is located in the province of San Pedro de Totora, department of Oruro, at an average altitude of 3940 meters above sea level (around 12,926 feet).



As I've read, it was discovered just about 3 years ago, in 2009. This site includes caves too. I found it absolutely beautiful and wished to share with all you. I apologize (once again), for not offering an english language source, but like I said, it was recently found and not totally investigated yet.











Google translation :


The first of these sites, we call Tutacachi-A, is in a semi-circular wing, whose floor is kept moist throughout the year. (3) Product of the foregoing, at the entrance grows ichu (Stipa ichu) and some plants tola (Lepidophyllum sp.). The dimensions of the wing are 8.50 m high, 18.50 m long and 11 m deep. Here it was possible to distinguish two panels: one located near the opening of the eaves (Panel 1) on the left side and one on the base of the wall (Panel 2). Together, the two panels cover an area of ​​11.20 m linear.

On the second visit, Matthias Strecker found Tutacachi-B site in an entry in the wall (which nevertheless falls short of an overhang), a distance of approximately 200 m in the first place.

It has an embossed panel of three highly weathered hands. Continuing south about 150 m, crossing a deep gully, we Tutacachi C, consisting of 4 panels that extend (separated by areas without interventions) on 15.50 linear meters along the wall of the plateau.

Also, along the plateau in south-west and west, we find the following sites: Tutacachi-D, with a panel of about 8 m long and 1.50 m high wall covering on both sides of a ridge rocky the plateau Tutacachi-E, which consists of a panel of 9 m long, including a 7 m without the presence of reasons; Tutacachi-F, a panel whose length is 10.40 m, and Tutacachi-G, panel with a length of 3.90 m.

To the southeast, the plateau descends into a gentle slope toward a runoff area of ​​about 150 m wide. In the area closest to the cliff of the plateau, and across from site C, are remnants of retaining walls of what appear to be ancient cultivation terraces not very large, and the foundations of circular structures made of rectangular stones and linear dacitic rough-hewn rock from the plateau. Continuing east on the area of ​​greatest erosion by water runoff, a large amount of cultural material on the surface, mostly pottery fragments, many of them of considerable size, attributable to Inka, Inka-Pacajes Karanga ( Chilpa) and style Caquiaviri (Kesseli and Parsinnen 2005: 400-401 and Claudia Rivera, personal communication). We also observed obsidian waste stone and other materials (fragments of arrowheads and tools for the carving of the earth).


www.rupestreweb.info...
issuu.com...




posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 

I might be wrong, but the hands look almost as if they were photoshopped onto the rock?
Either Way, interesting find.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


S & F

I very much appreciate your contributions to the forum recently.
Great find. Now I'm off to research the site further.




posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by GmoS719
reply to post by Trueman
 

I might be wrong, but the hands look almost as if they were photoshopped onto the rock?
Either Way, interesting find.


Haha...photoshopped?...don't think so. Anyway, the first source includes an extensive bibliography.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Slayer, thanks a lot man. Yes, it will be great if you can add more elements to this thread.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Thank you for this thread. I had no idea about this find. But like you said, its only been known about for 3 years.

How do you think the hand prints were made? Some of them look like they could of been carved but i'm not sure about the 'whole' hand prints that show the palm and fingers.

Gets me thinking about how the ancients claimed they were able to 'soften' stone with a plant of some kind. The modern human race heavily underestimates what our race used to be capable of.

S+F

Peace



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Why do you say you don't think so? And what's funny?
I just thought that it looked blurry to me where the hands are, and also the black on the fingers looks unnatural.
Like I said, I don't know.
I'm just giving my opinion.
Not trying to argue, just wondering what makes you think it isn't photoshopped?
Maybe I'm missing something.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:27 PM
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Just beautiful!

I wonder if the hands were worked into a plastering material or mud or something similar. The accuracy is interesting, given the abstract stylization of the pottery. And I love that one bright red piece -- such beautiful tints.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by iksose7
 


Well, in my opinion the places where the hands where printed were probably soft at that moment.

But you know what...I counted how many fingers those hands have, just in case...haha



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:30 PM
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reply to post by GmoS719
 


Ok brother, your opinion is respected



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


...this is in chile but its a hand, so it sorta kinda fits with this thread... really cool pic - found it while visiting, lol, bolivia... so easy to get distracted on google earth...


static.panoramio.com...



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by Trueman

Originally posted by GmoS719
reply to post by Trueman
I might be wrong, but the hands look almost as if they were photoshopped onto the rock?
Either Way, interesting find.

Haha...photoshopped?...don't think so. Anyway, the first source includes an extensive bibliography.


No, not photoshopped. The way I see it, that looks like the spot they all patted on their way out to play a football game. Go Tutacachi Tigers!



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by Wyn Hawks
 


Heluva hand !...who made it?

I wonder if the rest of the body in under the sand.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


Haha...that's a good one.

Seriously, it can't be photoshopped because there are also many other things in that place that confirms we are talking about an archeological site, so it's not just the hands.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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...i'm back in bolivia now - so much to see... heres an alien head...


static.panoramio.com...



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:09 PM
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Nice but a closer look shows they appear to be scooped out of the rock instead of pressed. Only the center one vaguely looks like a human hand.

I'd also suggest the artifacts may not be associated with 'hand prints'

I'll await the site report!
edit on 26/8/11 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:09 PM
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Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by Wyn Hawks
 


Heluva hand !...who made it?

I wonder if the rest of the body in under the sand.


...i dont know who created it... just stumbled on it via google earth... surely its not a relic, at least thats what i'm gonna tell myself to prevent nightmares, lol...



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Very interesting location it reminds me of another site over in Brazil. I'll post this from one of my older/earlier threads from a few years back.

Coincidence?

Inga Stone


The Ingá Stone (Pedra do Ingá in Portuguese) is located in near the small city of Ingá in the Paraíba State in the northeast of Brazil. The Ingá Stone is also called Itacoatiara do Ingá. The word Itacoatiara means stone in the Tupi language of the natives that lived in that area. It is composed of some basalt stones covered with symbols and glyphs undeciphered until now.

Most scholars think its origin is related to the natives that lived around until the 18th century, but there are also some people that defended an extraterrestrial origin. Most glyphs represents animals, fruits, humans, constellations (including the Milk Way), and other unrecognizable images.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:32 PM
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Yeah, really need a closer study of the stone to determine the nature of the marks and in particular a geological assessment.
edit on 26/8/11 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Normally, people in that time in history had no problem to draw an animal or a hunting scene. These hands doesn't fit in that kind of expresion.

I believe the hands could represent something abstract, as an expression of their minds.

I would like to think this could be a first attemp of a written language. Maybe each hand represents a person who lived in that group, the first I.D.



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