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Black Hole Eats A Star

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posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:26 PM
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This is pretty cool! NASA caught a still photo of a black hole ripping apart a star. NASA has only seen the after effects and never actually seen it "in the act"...until now.

I know this probably isn't as cool as an Earth destroying thread, or aliens making contact, but it's still pretty freaking sweet! Black holes amaze the crap outta me. Think about it, its a former star that has so much gravity that not even light can escape. That boggles my mind!

Here is the link. Enjoy!

Hungry Hungry Black Hole




posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:31 PM
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Damn, too bad it's not a real pic.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:33 PM
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reply to post by goochball
 


so are you saying it's another bad NASA photoshop job?



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:34 PM
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Originally posted by iNkGeEk
reply to post by goochball
 


so are you saying it's another bad NASA photoshop job?


No I'm saying it's a still from an animation.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by iNkGeEk
 


No, he's saying he took t he time to read the 'whole' thing and understand that it is a 'still' from a NASA animation on the subject...





posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:37 PM
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reply to post by goochball
 


ah...i can't get the farking video to play.
it keeps playing the commercial then just stops.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:37 PM
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Just to add, if we had a real photo of a black hole...it would be HUGE news.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:44 PM
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reply to post by iNkGeEk
 


The video said it was recorded by the Japanese Ebo module. Together with NASA the video was put together.


There should be an education level for people who reply to things they don't watch, and frankly, don't know anything about.
So tell us how one is to video record a process that could take thousands of years to play out?

They had real images BTW, they just didn't start filming it in the caveman days.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:50 PM
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Wow! That is too cool.. great find OP
I think the scariest thing about it though was an episode, the one Morgan Freeman hosts, where he explains that blackholes are not easy forces to spot most times and plausibly there could be one in our solar system and we wouldn't necessarily know it.. just a thought.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by 31Bravo
 


Surly you jest. You can't be serious. Are you that seriously uneducated? Really?

Do you realize what's going on there? At ALL?
edit on 25-8-2011 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 


Hey bud.. im sorry, is there more to this thread than what I read in the article? Don't attack me about my education because you don't know anything about me. Please restraint your rudeness and kindly explain why my response was out of line. Thanks



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by 31Bravo
 


dont worry man...apparently i was out of order for even posting the thread in the first place. i just found something that i thought was cool and wanted to share.

I guess that makes me a uneducated moron because the video wouldn't play and all i did was read the article.

and yes, the theory is that there is a black hole at the center of the milky way, but it's still pretty cool that they got to "see" the beginnings of the galactic buffet rather than the aftermath.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by iNkGeEk
 


No dude great post! Unfortunately older members on ATS think they know everything and everyone else is the moron.. sad part is they probably know less than most on here they just hide it with all those S&F's.. keep posting good stuff man you have my attention



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 01:14 PM
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*crickets* Sooooo... yea. Waitin on Illustronic's all knowing words on why he thinks this thread is moronic.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by 31Bravo
 


There can't be a black hole in our solar system because at that point the solar system would not exist. A star would have to be 10 to 20 times more massive than our sun to ever become a black hole, a black hole would have to come from somewhere, so we would see the effects of our neighborhood stars long before it would effect our sun. Lots of the tens of twenty nearest stars are less massive than our sun.

A lot of scenarios could take place in the short term depending on where the planets are in respect to the black hole's gravity overcoming the sun's, planets would either be ejected, orbit the black hole (doubtful), or fall into the hole, but most likely the solar system would be destroyed, as eventually the sun as well.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:13 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by 31Bravo
 


There can't be a black hole in our solar system because at that point the solar system would not exist. A star would have to be 10 to 20 times more massive than our sun to ever become a black hole, a black hole would have to come from somewhere, so we would see the effects of our neighborhood stars long before it would effect our sun. Lots of the tens of twenty nearest stars are less massive than our sun.

A lot of scenarios could take place in the short term depending on where the planets are in respect to the black hole's gravity overcoming the sun's, planets would either be ejected, orbit the black hole (doubtful), or fall into the hole, but most likely the solar system would be destroyed, as eventually the sun as well.


Wrong answer. You really need to do more research on your own convictions before you act like you're better than others.. I realize you might know more than some on ATS, but you damn well don't know everything.. make sure you look down before you look up, you know what I'm saying?

Side Note: I posted a response to this thread on my droid last night at a bar, and didn't have a lot of time to sound "educated" but I assure you, I'm not here to waste my, nor anyone elses time on ATS.. I like to learn things just like everyone else without having my intelligence questioned.. thank you in advance.
.



NOVA

Because it seemed relevant for GLAST—not to mention fun—we tried to figure out where the nearest primordial braneworld black holes might be. We were startled to realize that they would be right in our backyard, astronomically speaking: If they make up 1 percent of the dark matter in the universe, thousands of tiny black holes may lie within our solar system! Our immediate reaction was, "No, that can't be. If black holes exist in the solar system, surely we would know." Actually, maybe not. The gravity from these black holes is not very strong; you could add a few thousand of them to the solar system without really changing the planets' orbits. You would need to get within 12 feet of one of these black holes to feel as much gravity as you normally feel here on Earth. So your neighbors could have a pet black hole, and you might not realize it. Not that they could hold onto it: as far as we know, miniature black holes would not experience the atomic forces that make matter solid, so they would pass right through the planet.

edit on 26-8-2011 by 31Bravo because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:39 PM
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So exactly what effect would a mini black hole have on anything then? Subatomic black holes are created in particle colliders all over the world, of course those only exist for nano seconds. If these atomic black holes don't interact with baryonic matter what do they matter? Why should I care?



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 


Exactly. There's really no middle of the road. In another post here, a little while ago, I showed that even a significant-sized black hole at the center of the Earth would take much longer than the entire age of the universe to consume the Earth (due largely to the Eddington limit, though accretion rates also play a significant rule in limiting consumption). Anything much larger than the black hole I was using in my calculation would gravitationally affect the orbit of the Earth and any other planet it came near.

So, we have two possibilities:

1. the black hole is small/medium and it has no effect on anything;
2. the black hole is medium/large and it effects everything in its vicinity.

Again...no middle of the road.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 

What thread was that, you got a link so I can read it? Sounds interesting.

edit on 26-8-2011 by 31Bravo because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by 31Bravo
 


It was a short-lived thread - only 9 posts (others have been longer...a quick search should turn up a couple, at least) - but here it is:

Black hole inside earth, physics question



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