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To those in Irene's path that have never experienced this.

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posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by MRedfield
 


Wait till she gets closer to land in N Carolina, where the water is shallower. The water will roll up on itself, almost like a Tsunami.




posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 09:57 PM
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I've lived in South Florida for my entire 23 year old life. I will never forget in 2005 when we had the worst hurricane season on record. For those of you who forgot, there were so many storms that season the names moved into the Greek alphabet. That year the county I lived in at the time, Martin County, was hit directly by Francis and Jean. I learned enough about hurricanes in those few months to last me a lifetime.

One thing I will say about hurricanes that you should consider, besides the storm surge, is to make sure there is no debris lying around your yard. This includes lawn furniture and any lose branches etc. I don't know if this was mentioned yet or not, the storm surge not only affects those who live by the ocean, but also by any body of water that runs to the ocean.

I hope the Northern states don't have to endure such an event, but at the same time don't try to be a tough guy and think you're safe from harm. The best way to stay safe in a hurricane is to be prepared, and be prepared early.
edit on 25-8-2011 by Arrrr because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-8-2011 by Arrrr because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 09:57 PM
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I dont know much about hurricanes, but I watched a bit of msnbc a few minutes ago and they were reporting 41 ft swells in the center of the hurricane. What exactly is a swell? Is it another word for a giant wave and is that bad?



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:11 PM
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Reply to post by buni11687
 


Swells = waves

Hurricanes are fun. Just go with flow, then start calling the power company the next day to yell at em for the power being out.


Seriously though. Just play it safe and use your brain.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:15 PM
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Hopefully some link's to Katrina's damage will be enough to change people's mind. Bearing in mind all these images are taken along (what once) was seafront towns and villages, now gone.

images.nationalgeographic.com...

www.gulf-coast.com...

katrinadestruction.com...

Funny how quickly 'some' people forget.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by buni11687
 


Swells are usually meant to describe the waves out at sea. They never really break like a surfable wave might (they eventually break near the shore).
Normally, if you are in a 40 foot boat and the coast guard radio says 3-5 foot swells, you probably dont want to go out too far in the ocean. Youll def be rocking a lot. Couldnt imagine what anything over 20 would be like.


edit on 25-8-2011 by Salamandy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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As a hurricane survivor(Andrew), I'd like to offer some tips;

Evacuation route, if you can't bring pets to where you'll be sheltered please contact human societies/shelters, as they should offer help.

If you're not in an evacuation zone:
-car battery powered smaller TV, radio, batteries, food supplies, fresh water!, candles, matches/lighters...
-strap down and bring inside, easy for wind to pick up belongs from your yards
-board windows
-you'll want to be in the safest room in the house, which is the bathroom for most places or the room in the middle of the house(least walls on the outside)
-kennel pets or keep close with kennel handy(those inside) so you know where they are at all times
-stay indoors
-Large outdoor animals:here & more tips




edit on 25-8-2011 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:25 PM
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The surge is the amount of water being pushed forwards ahead of the Hurricane, because the central pressure is so low that exerted force 'pushes down' on the sea-surface and spreads it out.
Think of it like pressing your hand on a balloon, you leave a imprint, but the force you exert distributes itself across the surface of the balloon outwards and upwards..the same way we see a Hurricane pushing down on the Sea forcing it upwards.

Swell is the peak trough of a wave, that's preliminary modelled on wave amplification, tidal height and wind factors. But in situations such as this only Surge, Tidal heights and Wave heights come into play as the Swell is generally cancelled out due to the strength of the Hurricane force winds turning it into spray.

The Surge for the Carolinas modelled is 20ft (reported 32ft offshore Cape Canaveral right now), and NYC at 11-15ft depending on variables in the coming 48hr.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by RUDDD
 


So the hurricane forces pressure downwards, breaking up any swells at the point of contact and then creates the surge once it hits open water (creating the hand in balloon effect)?

On shore is it theoretically possible to witness the last group of swells immediately followed by the surge? Does it meet the shore as a wall of water?



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:43 PM
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Pretty much. You wouldn't necessarily see it as a wall of water though as it's a gradual transitional surge rather than a tsunami-like 'wave.' But over the coming hours you'd gradually notice the sea getting increasingly higher with increasingly bigger waves breaking onshore as the wind increases. Until your either succumbed by the surge as it eventually makes its way onshore and inland, or you've already found a higher place of refuge away from the seafront.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by RUDDD
 


Seems like it would be a high tide from hell.

I got stuck on Island Beach State Park two days ago and if not for 2 families towing me out a little, I might still be there to witness this surge. Just kidding but Id like to say thank you if they are reading this for some reason.

Also I may have the first injury related to Irene (sort of). We were putting our lawn stuff in shed when I fell off the deck stairs and twisted my ankle really bad. Couldn't walk for about 3 hours.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:54 PM
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reply to post by buni11687
 


It's bad if you're on a boat. I've been in 20' swells on a cruise ship and it was rocking and rolling. I was in 15' swells on a 50' yacht in the Caribbean and we decided maybe we didn't need to go back to St. Martin after all. Of course while 40' are pretty bad it can get much worse:

The carrier flight deck is 60' above the water line




posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:59 PM
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Originally posted by geraldcole
I'm in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia and the last one that we had here that was bad was Isabel. Hopefully it's nothing like that, we were out of power for 2 weeks. I literally live right near the water, stayed during Isabel, so there's no way I'm leaving this time.

Although, if you are not experienced in staying through the hurricane I would not recommend it.


Isabel did a number all the way up through Richmond. The cleanup after that went on for years even in Richmond City. If I remember correctly, Isabel's eye moved west of Richmond, and it's that side of the storm that ripped most of Virginia up. Last I heard, the eye is likely to remain right near the Virginia coast. Guess we'll be keeping a close eye on it. Was reading about VDOT's emergency lane reversal on 64 today. Not a bad plan actually, given the traffic that will be pouring out of the greater Chesapeake area if this storm looks worse.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by wasco2
 


I would crap my pants.

Glad I did not join the Navy.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by Salamandy
 


I live in the uk and thankfully have been spared such terrible weather. Have no advice to offer, but hope to God this Hurricane finds a wider East path. Good luck to all , you will be remembered in our prayers.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:03 PM
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lookin forward to the weather channel footage of surfers sufing the storm. not really



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:03 PM
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Lol you could call it a high tide from hell. Except the 'tide' just keeps on coming and coming until, in some cases (depending on land height) the sea can surge inland as much as a mile or more in some places. That's a lot of water with a lot of pressure behind it, not even factoring in +75mph sustained winds for over 6 hours as both sides of the eyewall passes over.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:04 PM
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reply to post by ateuprto
 


TO add to that, the east side is the strong wind side, and the west side is the heavy rain side . . . generally speaking.

Getting it head on, you get the best (or worst?) of both sides.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:10 PM
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Found this fantastic video taken by Mike Theiss during Charley (CAT5) he was chasing in FL. Now you know why only the pro's are left behind.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:57 PM
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Originally posted by RUDDD
Found this fantastic video taken by Mike Theiss during Charley (CAT5) he was chasing in FL. Now you know why only the pro's are left behind.



And he was sitting in his car during all that?
Thats not really very wise, is it?



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