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To those in Irene's path that have never experienced this.

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posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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Take it from someone who has seen more than 50% of the U.S.'s most powerful recorded storms just in my 29 years, if you live near the water leave, the wind is nothing compared to the surge. I don't care who you are, if you try to tangle with the surge at it's peak, your going to lose.

Just look up Pass Christian's hurricane history, We have seen it all even those before me. Crucial I have found always goes back to the being aware that tornados form quick as the outer bands approach, securing debris, and not being foolish when it comes to pride and staying near a large surge area.

If you actually do get hit and it is a 3 or higher, be aware of the mental meltdown some will have in shelters, patience will be your only friend.

I used to take the surge for granted until I got a little too close one time.

Just a heads up to some I have seen with questions that have never dealt with it. Good Luck!




posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:34 PM
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I once read somewhere that it is the storm surge that claims 9 out of every 10 hurricane victims. With that in mind, I'd say this is definitely wise advice. Do not under estimate the power of the surge!!!!
edit on 8/25/2011 by goochball because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by JAGx1981
 


That is a very thoughtful and meaningful post. Kudos to you for sharing and caring.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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I'm in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia and the last one that we had here that was bad was Isabel. Hopefully it's nothing like that, we were out of power for 2 weeks. I literally live right near the water, stayed during Isabel, so there's no way I'm leaving this time.

Although, if you are not experienced in staying through the hurricane I would not recommend it.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:43 PM
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Can you explain what a surge is for those that don't understand hurrcanes?



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:48 PM
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Exactly, whenever I read a story about "hurricane parties" I just think about how many partiers got swept out to sea in Katrina. This is not something to be trifled with, and the sooner those in the path leave the better off they will be, because you don't want to be stuck in gridlock when the storm rolls in. I hope everyone in the east stays safe, and here's hoping that the storms pass you by.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:55 PM
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Originally posted by JennaDarling

Can you explain what a surge is for those that don't understand hurrcanes?



Sure:


Along the coast, storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property from a hurricane. In the past, large death tolls have resulted from the rise of the ocean associated with many of the major hurricanes that have made landfall. Hurricane Katrina (2005) is a prime example of the damage and devastation that can be caused by surge. At least 1500 persons lost their lives during Katrina and many of those deaths occurred directly, or indirectly, as a result of storm surge.

Storm surge is an abnormal rise of water generated by a storm, over and above the predicted astronomical tides. Storm surge should not be confused with storm tide, which is defined as the water level rise due to the combination of storm surge and the astronomical tide. This rise in water level can cause extreme flooding in coastal areas particularly when storm surge coincides with normal high tide, resulting in storm tides reaching up to 20 feet or more in some cases.

Storm surge is produced by water being pushed toward the shore by the force of the winds moving cyclonically around the storm. The impact on surge of the low pressure associated with intense storms is minimal in comparison to the water being forced toward the shore by the wind.


Source



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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reply to post by JennaDarling
 


That is exactly what I was going to ask.


I'm in the UK so i'm lucky enough to have never witnessed Mother Nature at her worst.

Stay safe people.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by SilentE
 


With Silent on this, stay safe people. Take care of yourselves and those around you.

I rode a Vespa scooter through Hurricane Lilly some years ago, that was an experience I can tell you
.
Can't imagine something like the one's you guys get.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 02:43 PM
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Originally posted by geraldcole
I'm in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia and the last one that we had here that was bad was Isabel. Hopefully it's nothing like that, we were out of power for 2 weeks. I literally live right near the water, stayed during Isabel, so there's no way I'm leaving this time.

Although, if you are not experienced in staying through the hurricane I would not recommend it.


I am also in the Hampton Roads area. For those interested this is at 37.06N 76.37W. Just inside the little dip past Hatteras at the Virginia, North Carolina boarder. I too hope its no worse than Isabel. Isabels path was more inland which is why those low lying areas got flooded. The damage was mostly trees that went over due to a very wet spring and early summer.The trees took out the power lines from NC all the way through Maryland. It was the clean up of all those trees that resulted in people being without power for so long after the storm. There were people in more rural areas that were a month or more without power.
We have not had the rainfall that we had the year Isabel came through, the ground is not as saturated. The winds will perhaps be a bit stronger with this storm. We need the rainfall.
There is a wild fire burning in the Great Dismal Swamp that could be helped by this storm.
Stay safe Neighbor. Post conditions in your town on Saturday for as long as you can. We can give the forum a play by play. Hope for a boring day.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 02:49 PM
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Originally posted by SilentE
reply to post by JennaDarling
 


That is exactly what I was going to ask.


I'm in the UK so i'm lucky enough to have never witnessed Mother Nature at her worst.

Stay safe people.


No not at her worst but from what I've heard of your weather, she's in a constantly melancholy state. Always weepy and sniffly.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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My standard rule is that if a Cat 3's (or higher) forecast track has us in it's cone, we're outta here. Of course, one time we did this by car, and ended up driving closer to the path (it didn't go as it was predicted)...but lately, the predictions are a LOT more accurate.

Last few times, we were able to fly up to Rochester (my wife was part of a backup payroll team, so we could go up for free when a storm was coming)...

These days though, it'd be a driving road trip away from the coast. I'm not a fan of being within a few miles of the coast when a storm like that is on its way.

As mentioned, the surge is where you get those pictures of cars being swept down roads, etc. I'm a VERY strong swimmer...Coast Guard trained since a kid, but even I would never presume to be able to fight the kinds of currents that happen during these storms' surges.

As for Hurricane parties....why not? (as long as you're in a safe place). Though I'd recommend staying mostly sober.... (mostly)...



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 03:02 PM
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Guys,

thanks for the thread -- any advice for those of us living in the middle of Long Island NY?

TIA



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 03:10 PM
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well this is the first one I get to experience up close and personal. I hope it's much ado about nothing. we recently moved to the Delaware coast and I can't tell what's what. one neighbor says this / one says that. aye~yi~yi~yi!! I doubt even the county coordinators know what to advise. the 2 towns beside us are recommending evacuations, one is voluntary and one is mandatory. they are halting the ferry tonight and will not resume operations til Monday. all sales of alcohol will cease after tonight (bummer). but my town, so far no word on evacuations. maybe tptb already split or maybe they're stocking up on alcohol? anyways, out of an abundance of caution I booked a room 30 miles inland for my son and our dogs. btw, it's not very easy finding a place to accept medium & big doggies. but we sure as hell ain't leaving them. I am curious to see what transpires over the next 72 hours. I do like an adventure but I dont think I care to mess with Mother Nature. she don't seem very happy these days.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 03:10 PM
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GMA has this abcnews.go.com... ok so the ad plays first, but it does say 65 Million could be in the path of this, from NC to NY.
Do 65 need to think about Bugging Out?



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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reply to post by buddhasystem
 


It will be a pretty weak storm by the time it gets up there...

Same advice though, try and get away from the water if you can. If you can't. hunker down where you are when it gets closer.

The one thing to also consider...read up on tornado tips.

These kinds of storms (even when weakened) can often spawn tornadoes, and THEY do the real damage, in addition to storm surge.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by JAGx1981
 


Can i just ask, for those of you with horses, other large animals, what do you do with them when a hurricane approaches? Ive seen roofs stripped off sheds and barns (on tv). I just wondered if you have a massive underground shelter for them or do you leave them to fend for themselves so to speak?



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by JAGx1981
 


BTW, thanks for the advice. this hurricane is going to be something else. as I was typing this "Irene" just shifted course further to the west which means it will be even more dangerous than anticipated. I hope things don't get all nuts. I'm not quite prepared for nuts. so much for a lazy day at the beach .........................



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 03:47 PM
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Originally posted by JennaDarling

Can you explain what a surge is for those that don't understand hurrcanes?


Here's a visual for you. You know the cotton candy machine at the carnival. Its swirls the sugar around and it collects at the outside edge of the machine. In a hurricane the center of the storm is doing the same thing to the ocean. It is collecting on the outside edge of the eye. The spin of the storm draws the water up just like the sugar in the cotton candy machine. The surge can be as high as 25 ft possibly more.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by JAG 1981
 


of all the preparations made, one that is often forgotten is coffee.

when you wake up to no power and a mess to clean up, you will be a hero if you can hand out a cup of coffee.
gives some normalcy to thinking about what to do.

all you need is basic camping equipment, a percolating coffee pot, a propane stove, or gas barbecue grill.

your electric coffee pot won't work.



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