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posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by spikey
 


Jupiter has recently baffled scientists by losing it's 300 year old 'great red spot'

Um... no. Check whatever article you read again. The spot is still there.


and one of it's thousands of miles wide, major 'banding rings'

This is true.


that has always been there...

Um... no. Do a little fact checking. The same belt disappeared in the 70's and again in the 90's. It reappeared each time.




posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by spikey
 



What if a brown dwarf, emitting light only in the IR range was as black as a planet recently discovered that absorbs almost all visible light? It wouldn't reflect visible light then.

Brown dwarfs are not made of the same material as this planet you refer to. Brown dwarfs have a composition very similar to Jupiter. Brown dwarfs have been photographed in the optical range and they will continue to be imaged.


As far as we should be seeing gravitational affects of a relatively nearby, virtually invisible failed star in our system by now, it could be argued that we are seeing effects...Jupiter has recently baffled scientists by losing it's 300 year old 'great red spot' and one of it's thousands of miles wide, major 'banding rings' that has always been there...astronomers and most mainstream scientists don't know what to make of it...and are presently scratching their collective heads..theories will circulate naturally, but it's a surprise to say the least.

Jupiter has not lost its red spot. The cloud band has not always been there. It disappears often. It is believed that other clouds are obscuring the band.

The types of effects you describe would not be what astronomers would notice. The positions of the planets would change. They haven't.

A brown dwarf would be visible in the optical spectrum well out over 2100AU. Whole sky surveys would easily pick out a new planet or brown dwarf.



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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i searched one of the many sky maps for "CW Leonis" and "IRC +10216"...nothing came up. only "Leo" came up as a search result.



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by MadMaxZombie
 

One of many.
Not this one I take it.
www.sky-map.org...



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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i just checked that one now Phage...an area with a black streak across the screen came up when i searched "Leonis"...when i searched "IRC +10216", i came across a similar looking object compared to the Google Sky object...gimme a few to compare the two.



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


Like another poster said, that's because while standing next to your oven, it's right in your face. Take it up with the scientists that say that brown dwarfs can only be viewed in infrared. I am not a scientist. ~SheopleNation



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:15 PM
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reply to post by MadMaxZombie
 

Why didn't you use "CW Leonis"? That's the name of the star.
edit on 8/28/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by SheopleNation
 

Which scientists? You don't mean the ones that say a brown dwarf has the same bond albedo as Jupiter I guess.
Under the spectrum of the Sun, a brown dwarf would have a bond albedo similar to that of Jupiter and Neptune (Fig. 9). It would shine with reflected light from the Sun just like Jupiter does.
iopscience.iop.org...

But why would you pay any attention to it this time when you ignored it the first time?



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:19 PM
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i found a couple of odd things when i compared the two maps. the google sky version (the image that the OP is talking about) looks photoshopped. it's pixelation differs from the rest of the objects shown throughout the map. i have a question. what is the object to the lower right ( 5 o'clock) of this "Leonis" that shows up bright yellow on sky-map and bright green on google sky? i zoomed in and ran the mouse over it and "USNOA2 0975-06302621" shows up...i searched for it on 2 different search engines...no search results found.



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by MadMaxZombie
 

Why didn't you use "CW Leonis"? That's the name of the star.
edit on 8/28/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


i just used "Leonis" as my basic search first. didn't even have to put the "CW" in because nothing named Leonis came up...not CW Leonis, not Leonis Elenin (hahaha)...just constellation Leo...i'll double check for you though.



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by MadMaxZombie
 

"Leonis" is the constellation Leo.
"CW Leonis" is a star within the constellation.

USNOA2 0975-06302621 is just another star (a dim one) within the constellation. That is the US Naval Observatory catalog number for it.
VizieR
edit on 8/28/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:36 PM
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yeah, nothing came up on google sky for "CW Leonis"...it does for sky-map, but there are 5 or 6 objects that have names right there that we can't even see. like: USNOA2 0975-06335083, USNOA2 0975-06336812, TYC 834-138-1, USNOA2 0975-06333623, USNOA2 0975-06335556, USNOA2 0975-06335820, USNOA2 0975-06339384 (just to name a few)



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by old_god
 


That was a nice video. It does make you feel small. The space fart comment had me rolling. ~SheopleNation



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I guess you didn't pay attention to this yourself either? ~SheopleNation

Planet Facts



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:42 PM
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no Phage, the Leo constellation is called Leo: Leo contains many bright shining stars, such as Regulus (α Leonis); the lion's tail, Denebola (β Leonis); and γ1 Leonis (Algieba). Many other fainter stars have been named as well, such as δ Leo (Zosma), θ Leo (Chort), κ Leo (Al Minliar al Asad), λ Leo (Alterf), and ο Leo (Subra). (that was from Wikipedia btw)



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by MadMaxZombie
 


Exactly. ~SheopleNation



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:53 PM
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reply to post by SheopleNation
 

If a brown dwarf were anywhere near a star it would be visible by reflected light. If a brown dwarf was within the solar system it would be visible by reflected light.



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by MadMaxZombie
 



no Phage, the Leo constellation is called Leo: Leo contains many bright shining stars, such as Regulus (α Leonis); the lion's tail, Denebola (β Leonis); and γ1 Leonis (Algieba). Many other fainter stars have been named as well, such as δ Leo (Zosma), θ Leo (Chort), κ Leo (Al Minliar al Asad), λ Leo (Alterf), and ο Leo (Subra). (that was from Wikipedia btw)


So long as you're going to use WikiPedia, you might as well try using it properly:


IRC +10216 or CW Leonis is a well-studied carbon star that is embedded in a thick dust envelope. It was first discovered in 1969 by a group of astronomers led by Eric Becklin, based upon infrared observations made with the 62 inches (1.6 m) Caltech Infrared Telescope at Mount Wilson Observatory. Its energy is emitted mostly at infrared wavelengths. At a wavelength of 5 μm, it was found to have the highest flux of any object outside the Solar System.[4]


en.wikipedia.org...

The article even gives the celestial co-ordinates for CW Leonis:

RA 09h 47m 57.406s DEC +13° 16′ 43.56″

Try putting that into GoogleSky and see what you get... oh, wait....



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by MadMaxZombie
 

"Leonis" is latin for lion. That is why the constellation is called Leo in English, it is derived from the Latin. That is why the stars within the constellation have the designation Leonis.

When you search for "Leonis" in skymap you get the constellation. When you search for "CW Leonis" you get the star. When you search for "Beta Leonis" you get the star.
edit on 8/28/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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Originally posted by PhageIf a brown dwarf were anywhere near a star it would be visible by reflected light. If a brown dwarf was within the solar system it would be visible by reflected light.


That's your theory anyway. ~SheopleNation





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