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Another 4.5 in Virginia

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posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:43 AM
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We've had 7.500+ aftershocks since our 7.1 last Sept (year ago) here in NZ, so I know what I'm talking about aftershock-wise


Some can be large, but as I said above, if one larger than the 5.8 occurs that 5.8 becomes a foreshock and the new larger even the mainshock. Aftershock sequences can go on for days, weeks, months or, as we have found out here, years. Often the length of time it takes to subside is based on the original size of the event (see the a/shocks still occuring from Japan).

Just make sure you don't get complacent - be aware and alert each time the ground starts to move. Know your exits and I hope you've all got emergency kits sorts.

Kia Kaha (as we say here) "Stay Strong"




posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:43 AM
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Originally posted by Greensquad414
reply to post by jude11
 


I just saw this a minute ago, I knew I would see it posted here
. I didn't feel this one where I am this time though.

edit on 25-8-2011 by Greensquad414 because: (no reason given)


How close are you? Location?



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:44 AM
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felt it in norther central NC.
lasted about 3-4secs.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:45 AM
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Originally posted by Venomilk
quick post, but another just popped up as well. yours has more info, so star for you.

(ignore the haarpers destined to be here)
like i said in the other thread, you probably have another building up for tomorrow or the next day


Actually, I never paid much attention to the Haarpers...but lately I'm perking up a little.

Just a little...



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:47 AM
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Originally posted by Enlightenme1111
This is crazy. This fault has been inactive for so long. Look at all the nuclear power plants located along the east coast. If this fault becomes more active, we're all screwed. Those plants were not designed to sustain earthquakes.

Nothing was designed to withstand Earthquakes. That is the scary part. I'm in Southwest Missouri and have read with interest how St Louis and Memphis have a large % of buildings with unreinforced brick facades and other structural elements that are entirely incompatible with a major Earthquake.

It really scares me to think about a serious quake with the age and design issues of New York City, Boston or D.C.. So much of those cities date even further back and wouldn't have fared well in their best days. Here is hoping Nature was simply giving us all a reminder of humility and not a warning of more to come.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:50 AM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000

Originally posted by Enlightenme1111
This is crazy. This fault has been inactive for so long. Look at all the nuclear power plants located along the east coast. If this fault becomes more active, we're all screwed. Those plants were not designed to sustain earthquakes.

Nothing was designed to withstand Earthquakes. That is the scary part. I'm in Southwest Missouri and have read with interest how St Louis and Memphis have a large % of buildings with unreinforced brick facades and other structural elements that are entirely incompatible with a major Earthquake.

It really scares me to think about a serious quake with the age and design issues of New York City, Boston or D.C.. So much of those cities date even further back and wouldn't have fared well in their best days. Here is hoping Nature was simply giving us all a reminder of humility and not a warning of more to come.


As we've learnt here in New Zealand - earthquakes don't kill people.. buildings do.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:52 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


I certainly hope more wont come, I have always felt so terribly bad for those on TV who have been victims of natural disasters, not once did I feel any comfort from that and now I know why, it's terrifying, especially if it's 7.0 or higher, I can't imagine, living through just a 5.9 was enough for me, Thankfully I have made peace with everyone I know before hand, I don't like waiting till something awful happens to feel bad about what I have done in life, that's just hypocrisy, however I think it's time I make peace with myself that's for sure. I know this is probably nothing but this has certainly made me take a closer look at my own self.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:53 AM
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Originally posted by MoorfNZ

Originally posted by Wrabbit2000

Originally posted by Enlightenme1111
This is crazy. This fault has been inactive for so long. Look at all the nuclear power plants located along the east coast. If this fault becomes more active, we're all screwed. Those plants were not designed to sustain earthquakes.

Nothing was designed to withstand Earthquakes. That is the scary part. I'm in Southwest Missouri and have read with interest how St Louis and Memphis have a large % of buildings with unreinforced brick facades and other structural elements that are entirely incompatible with a major Earthquake.

It really scares me to think about a serious quake with the age and design issues of New York City, Boston or D.C.. So much of those cities date even further back and wouldn't have fared well in their best days. Here is hoping Nature was simply giving us all a reminder of humility and not a warning of more to come.


As we've learnt here in New Zealand - earthquakes don't kill people.. buildings do.



Yes they do, if the ground cracks and you fall in it and die.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:58 AM
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Nothing felt in Baltimore this time, so thanks to ATS for letting me know this happened.

I hope this fault line has gotten everything out of it's system for another 100 years or so.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:58 AM
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Originally posted by MoorfNZ
As we've learnt here in New Zealand - earthquakes don't kill people.. buildings do.


Although these are no big deal in the Western US, we in the East have not had decades of retrofitting and building codes that mitigate... well anything relating to an EQ. Along with the bedrock causing the affected areas to be so big, it seems to me if this continues, it won't be pretty even if they are relatively small EQs.

It might be nice to have some advice on things to do/not to do... I have just learned here on ATS that doorframes are not as good as we think... And water in the bathtub... What else might be things just to have in the back of our heads (besides rooftops)?
edit on 25-8-2011 by fredats because: grammar



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:58 AM
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reply to post by ISis12RA12ELohim
 


The 7.1 that hit us last Sept changed my life forever, and that of everyone I know. You just can't imagine what it feels like, I was holding on to my husband under the bed (it struck at 4.35am) asking if we were going to die. I won't even try to describe the sound of the quake - it went on for over 35 seconds but felt like an eternity - was clinging to the carpet listening to the house around us and the sound of things breaking in other rooms.... the thousands of a/shocks since have kept us on edge.

It is so important you are prepared - we were. Remember, I live in what was deemed a quiet seismic region of NZ.. what happened wasn't expected, in fact they didn't even know the fault it occurred on existed!!!! Since then they've found several more faults running under and around the city. We wait.

The reason we were prepared is that to my west by about 80km is one of NZs largest faults - the Alpine Fault!! Can't escape them here!



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:02 AM
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Originally posted by ISis12RA12ELohim
reply to post by jude11
 

I don't really care what people from "California" think, this is something new to me and it's damn scary


Just for the record, I've been in CA for nearly 30 years and every time there is a jolt,
I tremble.

There's nothing natural about feeling the earth moving quite literally beneath your feet, watching telephone poles and trees sway, hearing things pop and break. It is a seriously unnatural feeling of great imbalance and loss of control. Your world is swaying. The planet is moving. It's not a small feeling.

People who judge others and minimize what they are feeling are the reason we cannot empathize with the worlds population on a greater scale. We can't all be superman, nor are we meant to be. When we feel threatened, we respond. It's natural. It's flight or fight. It's the unknown and the anticipation of the unknown.

I will never understand the minimizing of another persons truth.
Here's where compassion can change the world.

I hope that you sleep tonight.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:06 AM
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reply to post by spinkyboo
 


I've never been in an earthquake but your description is probably how I would react.

I'll star you for teaching me what to expect



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:07 AM
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Originally posted by MoorfNZ
reply to post by ISis12RA12ELohim
 


The 7.1 that hit us last Sept changed my life forever, and that of everyone I know. You just can't imagine what it feels like, I was holding on to my husband under the bed (it struck at 4.35am) asking if we were going to die. I won't even try to describe the sound of the quake - it went on for over 35 seconds but felt like an eternity - was clinging to the carpet listening to the house around us and the sound of things breaking in other rooms.... the thousands of a/shocks since have kept us on edge.

It is so important you are prepared - we were. Remember, I live in what was deemed a quiet seismic region of NZ.. what happened wasn't expected, in fact they didn't even know the fault it occurred on existed!!!! Since then they've found several more faults running under and around the city. We wait.

The reason we were prepared is that to my west by about 80km is one of NZs largest faults - the Alpine Fault!! Can't escape them here!


Imagine one week without power. No refrigeration, water not coming from the lines and food running out.

Not pretty.

That's all it takes...one week. We are so dependent on the grid that many have no idea what would happen to society after 3 days, let alone 1 week.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:12 AM
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Originally posted by spinkyboo

Originally posted by ISis12RA12ELohim
reply to post by jude11
 

I don't really care what people from "California" think, this is something new to me and it's damn scary


Just for the record, I've been in CA for nearly 30 years and every time there is a jolt,
I tremble.

There's nothing natural about feeling the earth moving quite literally beneath your feet, watching telephone poles and trees sway, hearing things pop and break. It is a seriously unnatural feeling of great imbalance and loss of control. Your world is swaying. The planet is moving. It's not a small feeling.

People who judge others and minimize what they are feeling are the reason we cannot empathize with the worlds population on a greater scale. We can't all be superman, nor are we meant to be. When we feel threatened, we respond. It's natural. It's flight or fight. It's the unknown and the anticipation of the unknown.

I will never understand the minimizing of another persons truth.
Here's where compassion can change the world.

I hope that you sleep tonight.



The people in katrina would of loved a little shake over what they got.
5,9 ooooo big deal

tell a japanese that story they will tell you what it is REALY LIKE



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:12 AM
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Originally posted by spinkyboo

Originally posted by ISis12RA12ELohim
reply to post by jude11
 

I don't really care what people from "California" think, this is something new to me and it's damn scary


Just for the record, I've been in CA for nearly 30 years and every time there is a jolt,
I tremble.

There's nothing natural about feeling the earth moving quite literally beneath your feet, watching telephone poles and trees sway, hearing things pop and break. It is a seriously unnatural feeling of great imbalance and loss of control. Your world is swaying. The planet is moving. It's not a small feeling.

People who judge others and minimize what they are feeling are the reason we cannot empathize with the worlds population on a greater scale. We can't all be superman, nor are we meant to be. When we feel threatened, we respond. It's natural. It's flight or fight. It's the unknown and the anticipation of the unknown.

I will never understand the minimizing of another persons truth.
Here's where compassion can change the world.

I hope that you sleep tonight.





Emotions run very high during things like this and it's very hard for those who have lived with quakes to appreciate just how awful it feels, and not just for that moment when it hits but the unease it causes for days, weeks and months to come. Stress, anxiety and being frightened are all very natural - don't let others who think they're "brave" for not shaking when the earth does get you down.

Another emotion that's hard to deal with is that often people do 'enjoy' the rush of feeling a quake. I know I do even after 7,500 of them. But many don't and you need to be sympathetic. Also know that everyone will have felt the quake differently. Those nearest to the epicentre will have felt a jolt - those far away would have experienced the rolling S-wave feeling, like being on a boat. Both are disconcerting and both are damaging.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:17 AM
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reply to post by obummerdeception
 


That is exactly the sort of "response" I referred to - it is insensitive and the poster has no clue what he is talking about. NO MATTER how big a quake is, the fear and mental damage can far exceed any physical damage. Plus, many countries who are susceptible to quakes prepare their populations accordingly, and they have an expectation of a big one. People in areas where they are not usual will have been very shaken by this, it's insensitive and unnecessary to undermine their feelings.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:21 AM
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Originally posted by obummerdeceptionThe people in katrina would of loved a little shake over what they got.
5,9 ooooo big deal

tell a japanese that story they will tell you what it is REALY LIKE


Are you being sarcastic? Read spinkyboo's post again...

We can go on and on about how one person's evil out-does another's... but it is a sum loss. All suffering is bad. We don't need a scoreboard on it.
edit on 25-8-2011 by fredats because: refered to post incorrectly - changed to spinkyboo



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:31 AM
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Originally posted by MoorfNZ
reply to post by obummerdeception
 


That is exactly the sort of "response" I referred to - it is insensitive and the poster has no clue what he is talking about. NO MATTER how big a quake is, the fear and mental damage can far exceed any physical damage. Plus, many countries who are susceptible to quakes prepare their populations accordingly, and they have an expectation of a big one. People in areas where they are not usual will have been very shaken by this, it's insensitive and unnecessary to undermine their feelings.


I WAS 200 FT from a tornado!!!! I'LLTAKE A little earthquake anyday..
Talk about insensitive... Your taking something small turning it into a big thing!!
Joplin MS. would of loved your little ground shake!! I WOULD TOO!

RUN OUT SIDE INTO A TORNADO!!
What I REALLY mean is BE THANKFULL it was not something worse....

edit on 25-8-2011 by obummerdeception because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:47 AM
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reply to post by obummerdeception
 


I'd swap my mag 7.1 and a year of aftershocks for your 200ft comparatively brief encounter a tornado anyday.... but that's not the point, a point you are missing by a mile. It doesn't matter how BAD it was, it's how the individual experienced and deals with it. It's not a competition of whose storm/quake/rumble was bigger. Some may have shrugged it off, some haven't.. you can't 'tell' someone they experience wasn't as scary as it was.



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