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how to build a galaxy sized laser

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posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 06:20 PM
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using the basic elements of a laser (Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation) but using the gravity and energy of a galaxy to stimulate emission and an exterior source of light to the galaxy to provide for a focusing effect for the beam.

the main parts (that i know of) of a laser are,
1.the primary reciprical reflectors (in this case the outter lenses act as primary and seconary lensets) allowing light through and into the lens while reflecting a percentage of the light back from the inside around inside the lens.

"primary collection mirrors on a laser"

2. the seconary reciprical reflectors are in the form of an optical caustic of scattered light that is "mirrored" onto the originating side due to recipricity of light (is that a word?) the "gravitational" and magnetic fields "twist" around the central axis and provide for a small "window" for the reflected light to escape from.

"seconary amplifying mirrors"

3. instead of using atoms at this scale, we are going to use heliospherical "bubbles" (think atom) with a light source in there center that is also collecting and focusing the light from the exterior source, this is going to be our atom in an excited state (star light from host star with exterior light imput),

"heliosherical lenses as atoms"

4.optical focal path with gas stimulated from lower state into higher state,
(the closer to the center you get the more gravity effects refractivity and atom energy states)
so a progressivly increasing optical density due to the increase of energy inherant in the atoms as the gravity increases and changes the distence between the atoms and their energy contents (gravity induced "density of gas) "popular inversion"

"gravitational and density optical focus" like a coupler lens
and (i think it works like this)

light from an outside source trasitions the outter surface of the galaxy and as it travels it through the "major" lens it is collected by the gravitational microscoping potential of the heliospherical bubbles inside the galaxy, because the light inherant inside the helio bubble lenses and the collected light from the exterior source "focus through" the same helio bubble lens, these lenses are in a high energy state, (simular to the excited atoms in a gas laser)

when we add the effects of the galaxy acting like a "collector" and "internal reflector" and the individual helio "bubble lenses" as in their exicited states acting like excited atoms, all we need is reciprical light to bounce back and fourth through the lenses each time being refracted and curved due to refractivity and gravity , and each time getting reflected by the secondary reflectors (the internal galaxy lens) and the light is over time focused into the caustic,

and any light that is along the "axis" of rotation it is "allowed" to exit throught the "hole" in the galaxy created from the rotational gravitational potential "in a fine confined spiraling beam"

this is how a laser works (simplifyed)


this is the idea of a galaxy sized laser,
and if we could find the right galaxy im sure we could see the "components in action"

any reason why this wouldnt work?

xploder




edit on 24-8-2011 by XPLodER because: spelling

edit on 24-8-2011 by XPLodER because: change galaxy to helio lense in description

edit on 24-8-2011 by XPLodER because: add utube

edit on 24-8-2011 by XPLodER because: change vid

edit on 24-8-2011 by XPLodER because: change utube vid again

edit on 24-8-2011 by XPLodER because: add more




posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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Very nice explanation,my friend.

S&F!



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by Nikola014
 


its interesting to think that a laser could occour under normal galaxy conditions,
and if the light was to get into a high enough state it could create "jets" of energy streaming away from the host galaxy and if posable this "relitivistic jet" could "draw" material with it


could AGNs be in various phases of releasing laser beams orginized by optics and gravity? useing light and many lenses inside a "compound lens"?

would be cool to think of jets as a laser

xploder



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 06:45 PM
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Interesting! Just saved to my ATS as I'll be back later. Gets your mind thinking. Nice 1 OP



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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You don't understand the "stimulated emission" part. It has nothing to do with focusing light.

A laser works because the electrons within the lasing material are raised to a higher energy state. When enough electrons are energized they return to their natural state (and in the process the atom emits radiation) simultaneously. This requires that the atoms are quite closely packed. The material within a stellar "bubble" is too diffuse to produce the effect, the distance between stars makes the idea even less feasible.

There are, however, natural lasers. At least one infrared laser has been found, where the dense protoplanetary disk surrounding the star is stimulated to lase by the intense ultraviolet radiation from it. The radiation is so intense that no mirrors (or lenses) are required.
adsabs.harvard.edu...


edit on 8/24/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


so galaxies can be natural lasers

at least in the case you linked to, but i take it it was a wave interference induced laser not an optical laser, i will read the link now
thank you again Phage


ok back so this is a case of natral amplification of sub mm and infrared wavelengths,
given the correct optical parematers "internal reflectors" could other wave lengths be made to lase at the focal point for the gravity lens? if the refracted and reflective properties were correct (intenally reflective)
could other wavelength give similar results?

xploder
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edit on 24-8-2011 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-8-2011 by XPLodER because: add more



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

No, not galaxies. The material is not dense enough.
Young planetary systems can be lasers when the star is energetic enough and the disk dense enough.


edit on 8/24/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


so are you say that both the "galaxy halos" and the density of the "galactic disc" are not are neither dense enough nor internally reflective enough to increase light intensity inside the galaxy?

because if galaxy can "gravitationally lens" a galaxy that would be too distant to see without them"
then they are to a degree increasing the photons avaliable to see = light amplification,

xploder



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

No.
That is light gathering, not light amplification. You are comparing a magnifying glass to a laser.

Light gathering crams existing photons into a smaller area.
Light amplification produces more photons. A LASER produces those photons at a specific energy level, a specific wavelength.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:39 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by XPLodER
 

No.
That is light gathering, not light amplification. You are comparing a magnifying glass to a laser.

Light gathering crams existing photons into a smaller area.
Light amplification produces more photons. A LASER produces those photons at a specific energy level, a specific wavelength.


in this senario the focal path "along" the axis of rotation is like the "tube" and in this area popular inversion
on an atomic level takes place, the helio lenses are just focal "collectors" and "emittors to "enhance" the amount of light to be gravitationally "bent" back towards the "tube" of axis area.

xploder



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


do you know of the optical properties of dark matter halos?
or the refractive properties?, if the dark matter halos had a more reflective inner surface,
then the exterior ,even at a few percent more internally reflective,
the "confinment" of light would allow for amplification if stimulation was present, and i beleive that the intense forces around a black hole could allow fo popular inversion of atoms as they circle the black hole, a high energy state

xploder
edit on 24-8-2011 by XPLodER because: add more



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

In principle, dark matter has no optical properties. It neither affects radiation or emits radiation.
That's why it's called dark matter.

edit on 8/24/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


from phages link,



source

so at subb mm and infrared wavelengths a laser effect is observed cool
thanks phage, it is noted this is not explained as an optical effect.

xploder



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 08:11 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


our solar system has recently been shown to have "bubbles" around it,
if a similar "bubble" arangment was to be found the galaxy, this could provide the reflectivity required surfaces
thoughts?

xploder



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by XPLodER
 

No.
That is light gathering, not light amplification. You are comparing a magnifying glass to a laser.

Light gathering crams existing photons into a smaller area.
Light amplification produces more photons. A LASER produces those photons at a specific energy level, a specific wavelength.



in this design the "focus" is what allows the effect to start,
the focus is strongest through the axis of rotation, meaning more "light" will be perpendicular to the the axis of rotation. this super heated "pathway" has a "reciprical" light effect due to optical light refractions and optical density. as the exterior light is focused (mangnifying glass) the relected light from the focus is directed back along the axis of rotation, the outgoing (optical focus) and incoming light "focus return" (optical caustic)
a populatar inversion takes place in the path along the axis of rotation, and the reciprical (optical caustic) concentrates light towards the center, the hole is at the axis of rotation through the lens

xploder



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

I said it was an infrared laser when I provided the link. I'm not sure what your point is.
You do understand that, being of lower energy, it's easier to produce an infrared laser, right?



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

*sigh*
As I said, you do not understand what stimulated emission of radiation means or what it requires.

edit on 8/24/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


ok my understanding of stimulated emition is when an atom is at a higher than normal state, this state is untenable and random photon emition occours, if the atom is stimulated the state increases and if hit by a photon in this state will release the energy above the "normal" potetial of that atom,
if the incoming light frequency matches the "extra" energy held in the atom at a higher state, two photons are released.

the stimulation is when outside energy puts the atoms in the higher energy state and poulation inversion takes place.

when light is bounced backwards and forwards through the inverted gas photon amplification is observered.

so do i understand the process?

xploder



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 09:11 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by XPLodER
 

I said it was an infrared laser when I provided the link. I'm not sure what your point is.
You do understand that, being of lower energy, it's easier to produce an infrared laser, right?


i do have a basic grasp on how they work
depending on the type of laser,
i dont know all the different types ect but know the basic principals behind the operation of some of them


any info would be very much apreciated


xploder



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

You have it more or less correct but your biggest problem lies with comparing heliospheres to atoms and the galaxy to a gas tube.

Heliospheres are not atoms, they don't behave according to the rules of quantum mechanics. They don't have discrete energy states. They are not subject to stimulated (or spontaneous) emission of radiation.

A galaxy is thousands of light years thick. Even if there were some sort of stimulated emission possible from a heliosphere, it would take thousands of years for each "bounce" of the light. The heliospheres would return to their ground state spontaneously. Population inversion could not occur. The density is not high enough. There could be no lasing.




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