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Coriander Oil Could Tackle Food Poisoning and Drug-Resistant Infections

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posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 02:46 PM
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Coriander Oil Could Tackle Food Poisoning and Drug-Resistant Infections


www.sciencedaily.com

Coriander oil has been shown to be toxic to a broad range of harmful bacteria. Its use in foods and in clinical agents could prevent food-borne illnesses and even treat antibiotic-resistant infections, according to the authors of a study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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I found this sort of surprising....

for the longest time I thought that medical science was in the pocket of Big Pharma, and that any such declarations of the value of common food stuffs would be generally squelched until such time as a synthetic derivative could be formulated and patented.

Yet here we have the Journal of Medical Microbiology clearly publishing something that belies the meme...


The researchers from the University of Beira Interior in Portugal tested coriander oil against 12 bacterial strains, including Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Bacillus cereus and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Of the tested strains, all showed reduced growth, and most were killed, by solutions containing 1.6% coriander oil or less.


Nice to see that nature does indeed provide an unanticipated solution to some medical problems....


Coriander oil is produced from the seeds of the coriander plant and numerous health benefits have been associated with using this herb over the centuries. These include pain relief, ease of cramps and convulsions, cure of nausea, aid of digestion and treatment of fungal infections.


I think I'll start cooking with this stuff more frequently...


The researchers suggest that coriander oil could have important applications in the food and medical industries. "In developed countries, up to 30% of the population suffers from food-borne illness each year. This research encourages the design of new food additives containing coriander oil that would combat food-borne pathogens and prevent bacterial spoilage," said Dr Domingues. "Coriander oil could also become a natural alternative to common antibiotics. We envisage the use of coriander in clinical drugs in the form of lotions, mouth rinses and even pills; to fight multidrug-resistant bacterial infections that otherwise could not be treated. This would significantly improve people's quality of life."


The news is sometimes good.


www.sciencedaily.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 02:54 PM
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That's interesting.
MY wife is prone to infections due to a Lupus-like condition.

We keep ground coriander, and use it in some dishes.
Maybe we should use it more often.
So let your Cilantro plants go to seed!



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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my wife just had post-gastric tummy tuck surgery. she now has holes in her groins. they are called opens. green and deep.very common.wonder what would happen if coriander oil went onto the wet to dry packing?



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by mikeybiznaz
my wife just had post-gastric tummy tuck surgery. she now has holes in her groins. they are called opens. green and deep.very common.wonder what would happen if coriander oil went onto the wet to dry packing?


Be careful!

I wouldn't go messing around without professional knowledge (unless you are a doctor yourself) because you don't want to make things worse for her.

Ask her physician; maybe - if he thinks it could be harmless - he'll let you try.

I was under the impression that this article and research confined itself to 'ingesting' the oil. not using it as a topical treatment. But then I am no doctor.... so don't take any of this as medical advice. Word to the wise.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


thats why i ask....lol



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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This belongs in Alt Sub. Although most people think coriander, dill, sassafrass, oregano and other essential spice oils are just spices, however they are in fact what are called essential amphetamines and drug precursors. Many are considered drugs themselves and are illegal or controlled. Some such as sassafrass are converted by the liver to an analogue of MDMA and as such are drugs. Apiole from dill and coriander is the precursor to the psychedelic amphetamines. The list is quite long and well known to the DEA and should be known here to make sure the T&C remain intact
seed



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by Maxmars

Originally posted by mikeybiznaz
my wife just had post-gastric tummy tuck surgery. she now has holes in her groins. they are called opens. green and deep.very common.wonder what would happen if coriander oil went onto the wet to dry packing?


Be careful!

I wouldn't go messing around without professional knowledge (unless you are a doctor yourself) because you don't want to make things worse for her.

Ask her physician; maybe - if he thinks it could be harmless - he'll let you try.

I was under the impression that this article and research confined itself to 'ingesting' the oil. not using it as a topical treatment. But then I am no doctor.... so don't take any of this as medical advice. Word to the wise.


I would be careful of trusting a doctor most of them dont have that great a knowledge especially when patients have multiple issues and can easily put the patient in even more danger
also they are paid by big pharma and just dish out what makes them money



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


Interesting.

Thanks for the info (S&F)

Coriander Oil is nice to know about because coriander can be grown in most of the USA and even in containers Garden Guide

Another good food for tummy upsets is ginger. I have problems with food allergies and use a bit of crystallized ginger for my tummy upsets. Works quite well. Much better than anti acids or other over the counter remedies.

It is the reason ginger ale is the beverage of choice in hospitals.

Puff balls also have a anti-microbial action in the gut. Eat too much and you can wipe out the good bacteria in the gut. (Eat yogurt to put the bacteria back)

PUFFBALL USAGES AMONG NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS

Using Ginger to Treat Upset Stomach



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 


do you mean puff balls that grow from scrub oaks....those puff balls we as kids would stomp for the pop effect.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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all smooth skin puffballs are excellent edibles when white inside and have antibiotic action internally and externally. The spores are both styptic and anti-bacterial. Raw coriander oil is very hard on the liver but has anti-bacterial action internally and externally. Excess amounts of this essential amphetamine can cause an unpleasent stimulation and anxiety.
seed



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by mikeybiznaz
 


The ones I eat grow from the ground. have no "Stems" to speak of and are about the size of a baseball or larger.




Puff balls and morrells are the safest mushrooms to find and eat because they are easy to identify. HOWEVER the rule is ALWAYS positive ID several specimens in the same area. Never eat Puffballs that are not white inside. (You can find out more about them on the internet.)

There are more than one type of eatable puff balls too. Oh and they freeze even better than commercial mushrooms because they are not as full of water.

Morrell mushroom growing kit

www.gmushrooms.com...

(I love mushrooms)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:06 PM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 


hey thanks and you do remind me that I need a couple of books in my bugout bag



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:31 PM
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Caution
As a clinical aromatherapist, please do not go rushing off to buy Corriander Essential Oil to use internally. Firstly because it is often adulterated. It's pice will reflect this. IF you do buy it to use for gastro-intestinal problems make sure it is from a reputable Essential Oil supplier and dilute 5 drops max to 10ml of carrier oil such as Sweet Almond oil, unless you have a nut allrgy in which case use grapeseed or sunflower (but not the cooking variation!) oil. Then massage this on the stomach just a couple times a day.
To be honest there are other oils to treat digestive and gastro-intestinal problems, but it depends what ails you.
Word of caution the EO (EssentialOil) can be stupefying in large quantities.
As to using it as a tea or infusion from the seed/plant...no problems as far as I can see...but get advice from a qualified herbalist.
To give you some idea of the difference in potency between EO's and herbs.
Chamomile...often used to help one sleep. Used as an EO in a bath you would need the equivalent of 35 cups of chamomile tea to just ONE DROP of Chamomile EO! Think I would end up running to the loo all night. The point is herbs take time to 'build up' in the system, whereas EO's work almost immediately.
Hope this clears this up a bit.
Rainbows
Jane



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 07:39 PM
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there are a number of reasons why food needs to be properly seasoned.

herbs and spices are much more than new flavours for your mouth.

of course they re not to abused either, moderation is the key.

unless you re in india or mexico where its necessary to


 
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posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


It IS good news. And fyi - very many spices and herbs are known to be anti-bacterial, anti-viral and most important, to inhibit prion propagation.


Seriously - the main ingredients of curry are amazing on all fronts - try to use turmeric, cumin, coriander daily. Sage and thyme are excellent too. All counteract common contaminants.

Good find. S&F.

Oh yeah though - Big Pharma funds this stuff so they can create synthetic versions. ...Needless to say, don't bite or buy. Go for the real thing every time.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 06:29 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 




....Seriously - the main ingredients of curry are amazing on all fronts - try to use turmeric, cumin, coriander daily. Sage and thyme are excellent too. All counteract common contaminants......


Do not forget Celery seed and garlic.

They are good for prevention of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease and cancer.

It is worth taking the time now to do internet searches on various herbs and spices, especially those you can grow or can gather wild. You want to know what has medical properities and what are full of various vitamins.

For example rose hips are extremely high in vitamin C and are easy to dry. Therefore they provide Vit. C during the winter when fruit is not available. Edible Landscaping has a variety of rose with rose hips the size of strawberries.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by crimvelvet
 
mother nature has cures right in front of our eyes.Forget the pharmacy big brother scemes.Now days al the fast food and processed crap is screwing with our bodies..i love seeing posts that nurture the soul, cayenne pepper,lemon zest,ginger, collard greens,nuts...have healing properties.. put good stuff in good stuff out...




posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:37 AM
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Originally posted by Maxmars


I found this sort of surprising....

for the longest time I thought that medical science was in the pocket of Big Pharma, and that any such declarations of the value of common food stuffs would be generally squelched until such time as a synthetic derivative could be formulated and patented.


Research requires funding, where does the funding come from? Big Pharma are eager to identify and exploit natural resources, and then, naturally, they are best able and placed to develop a synthesised alternative for the pharmacutical market. There are a lot of PhDs in the plant sciences that are funded by Big Pharma, almost as many as there are being funded by the major fuel producers.



posted on Sep, 1 2011 @ 07:19 AM
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Originally posted by Maxmars


I found this sort of surprising....

for the longest time I thought that medical science was in the pocket of Big Pharma, and that any such declarations of the value of common food stuffs would be generally squelched until such time as a synthetic derivative could be formulated and patented.


Natural products is a huge area of pharmaceutical/medicinal research, no matter the source. The thing is, any bioactive compound they can find and isolate in these, they can (and will) patent it; common herb or otherwise. They can't patent the herb itself, but the stuff in it? Absolutely.


Originally posted by KilgoreTrout
Research requires funding, where does the funding come from? Big Pharma are eager to identify and exploit natural resources, and then, naturally, they are best able and placed to develop a synthesised alternative for the pharmacutical market. There are a lot of PhDs in the plant sciences that are funded by Big Pharma, almost as many as there are being funded by the major fuel producers.


Plant scientists don't tend to have much to do with drug discovery or the isolation and structural elucidation of natural products. That's where we chemists come into it. Of the PhD's I know in the latter area, almost all of them have their project's funded by government grants as well as a collaborating independent herbal medicines company. In my group, which focuses on natural product synthesis, most are commercially sensitive and work in collaboration with various organisations, etc. A lot of university based groups will even have their own small pharma company and operate through government funding. However, the same cannot be said for industry labs (obviously).



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