It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Children's Book 'Maggie Goes on a Diet' Causes Stir

page: 1
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 11:53 AM
link   
Bullying and self image! Those two words have become much more controversial over the years. Times like these a small incident will turn into a war over name calling. But the current subject is over a book. A simple children's book called Maggie goes on a diet. Maggie is bullied and teased. The book goes to say she will eat to make herself better. But then she diets and exercises to lose weight. Now she is popular, a star of soccer team and even more popular for being healthy. Which many parents are disgusted over the subject matter of the character becoming thinner and people respecting her because she is skinnier. Yes, I understand it's hard and everyone thinks differently. Being an adult I do not care what people think of me or treat others with disrespect. But children of today are different and sometimes kids can take things to hard. What I see here is we need to make kids feel happy about themselves. But we also need to influence them to improve themselves. Not just get upset over small issues and making them worse.
Video link




posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 11:58 AM
link   
Eh.... as an american living overseas, who takes in everyones kids for the summer so they can experience France,
I'd say it's not a bad idea to teach the kids to consider their body, and if it takes pointing out the reflection society will give you as benefit, so be it. I find it very sad to keep picking up these obese kids from the airport, who have absolutely no clue they are terribly obese, are incredibly arrogant (they definately feel good about themselves, no problem there!) and no one has been honest enough with them to tell them they are in bad shape and will live a shorter and less comfortable life because of their weight.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:01 PM
link   
I think the message intent is good but comes off as bad because of the "you need to be skinny to be popular" mantra, but the book is speaking on a kids level to which they understand in their small social world.
All in all I think a book shouldn't be criticized for what parents aren't taking control of themselves, and maybe controversy like this will make them take a step back and look at what they are doing.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:31 PM
link   
Whether you pick American (or Canadian) kids up at the airport, or just take a stroll in any mall...you can immediately see a very large percentage of them are "over their ideal weight".

Cast your eyes on those in their 30's and 40's and you will witness epidemic levels of outright obesity.

Folks in their 70's and 80's? Not so much. I wonder why?

I have not read the book...only watched news stories on TV about it last night...but what in the world is wrong with promoting healthy eating and exercise? And, beat me up for saying it but, it is also true kids are less likely to make fun of kids with athletic builds than those who are portly.

One of the arguments coming from the politically correct was that this book might promote more eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia. Maybe (though I have my doubts). Even if so, I wonder what the statistics are for the number of people who die each year from these disorders, versus the numbers who die from complications associated with excessive girth...



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:33 PM
link   
The best part about this book? Diets don't work, lifestyle changes do. Temporary changes in eating patterns forces your body to resist losing weight and when you quit, you gain back more than you had in the first place because your body is geared to add more weight on you after or during a famine.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:36 PM
link   
reply to post by CynicalDrivel
 


So which of these does the book promote...diets, or lifestyle changes?

If you know, of course.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:46 PM
link   
reply to post by ManOfGod267
 


While I understand why the author tried to make the book *title* simple for the audience, this is where I think the problem is created. Saying she goes on a *DIET* is what creates much of the uproar--in my opinion. And the character, Maggie, is very, very young as well.

Healthy lifestyles including nutrition, exercise, and even coping strategies should definitely be emphasized, but it should be for one's own self-worth; not to win a popularity contest.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:47 PM
link   
As a father of 2 girls this disgusts me. Written by a man, right? It would have to be, or a cold blooded woman. There's enough pressure on our girls(I'm discounting boys as they weren't mentioned) already to conform to what society expects of them. Barbie dolls anyone? Is this productive or a precursor to eating disorders that can be deadly. Either by anorexia, bulimia or suicide. Maybe this asshole should write a book on how to be happy with yourself.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:47 PM
link   
I think it is sad that kids are left to struggle alone with lifestyle. I mean, why aren't the parents eating their meals with them and giving them wholesome foods? The whole world around them holds up junk food, and they are supposed to battle that alone??



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:51 PM
link   
reply to post by intrepid
 


Hey! Everyone is different. Every parent raises their children differently. Many are strict and old fashioned. Many just want kids to be kids. I'm not a father but I do hope down the road I will become a parent. My ideas on how people have evolved seeing different parents in my life. Many of them dead beats. So, I have been influenced to become a strict disciplinarian as a parent. I would whether see my children succeed in life then just try to see them worship other kids to make them like them.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:57 PM
link   
It's a sensitive topic for children and parents alike. If to convey, as this book seems to show with the demographic from girls age 6 to 12 years, in the wrong light it can cause more problems than not. Thus adding to the rise in childhood and teen anorexia/bulimia. Wouldn't it be better for parents(or to even seek help) to help their obese children eat right and exercise instead of a story sorely portrayed as the critics explain?


A report published last year in the journal Pediatrics revealed that the number of U.S. children under 12 that had been hospitalised with eating disorders had soared by 119 per cent between 1999 and 2006. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...

The "fight against obesity"'s downfalls(related to how the book is written?) may be the cause of the rise in weight loss related eating disorders. Not to mention the rise of the egocentric reality tv based media to the diminishing middle class. Sedimentary lifestyle norm in the digital age plays a factor, but the cause of the rise of obesity is still up for debate(nutritionists, scientists).



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:57 PM
link   
I blame parents for overweight kids.
As a parent, your job is to look after the well being of your child.
Not give-in to their every desire, or spoiled rotten cry for McD's.


I see far too many overweight kids and then I see their parents...
No wonder.

It should be a set-by-example lifestyle.
Parents teach their kids to eat right from an early age.
Not feed them junk or fast food just to make them happy.

I won't get into the marketing towards children that junkfood companies do.
That's a whole different topic.

But sadly today's lifestyle is about convenience.
Fast, speedy, expedited food as not to interfere with normal daily routines.

It is troubling...today's youth.
If a book promoted change because of bullying, so be it.
If it's about self image and a "this-is-what-you're-supposed-to-look-like", idea...That's different.

Children need good direction and leadership from parents.
Not parenting from a television.
There's far too much of that going around now anyways.






posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:01 PM
link   

Originally posted by mobiusmale
Whether you pick American (or Canadian) kids up at the airport, or just take a stroll in any mall...you can immediately see a very large percentage of them are "over their ideal weight".




I know. Each summer I have to have the talk with my own kids and explain to them that in America, it is not polite to mention when someone is grossly overweight. It is hard for me to say"Adults are not honest with kids in my country. We worry about them feeling bad about themselves. So as a result, they are very fragile. They cannot handle seeing the reality of themselves and you can do great damage by exposing it."

Peer pressure has always, and will always be a factor in people choices, especially when young. I am not against that pressure being to take care of ones health (ahead of making money, consuming MORE). The argument that it is all about looks is invalid for me. My husband dissertation was on obesity and I started to get a glimpse of the statistics concerning problems like Diabetes associated with obesity in the US, and it is horrific.

edit on 24-8-2011 by Bluesma because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:03 PM
link   
reply to post by havok
 


Exactly. We didn't have Micky Dee's in my time. You wanted to eat out? That's a BBQ.

BTW, do yourselves a favor and check out MD caloric charts. MASSIVE fat and salt. Even in their "shakes". I don't think you can even call them "milk".



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:08 PM
link   

Originally posted by Bluesma
My husband dissertation was on obesity and I started to get a glimpse of the statistics concerning problems like Diabetes associated with obesity in the US, and it is horrific.


Makes sense but sometimes these things are genetic. I can understand why my father has progressed from Type 2 Diabetes to Type 1. Why am I Type 2? I'm in pretty good shape for my age(49). About 80lbs less than he was at my age. FTR, I'm 5'10". 210lbs. Genes.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:28 PM
link   
...theres nothing wrong with the book... maggie is 14yrs old... yes, its market focus will include younger kids but i dont have a problem with that...

...i do have a problem with book-burners and those who want to censor books or put a stupid rating on them or run a book down because it threatens their little anal retentive world...

...the book also adresses bullies and bigotry... whats wrong with that?... nothing...

...is it a bit shallow because it shows maggie making new friends and enjoying her life more after she loses weight?... perhaps but a lot of society is extremely shallow...

...the anal retentives that are making a stink about this book want to put everyone's kid in a "stupid bubble"... sure, theres a possibility that some kid might read it and might get a eating disorder from its message but, of course, dont deal with the reality that THAT kid was already screwed up...



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:30 PM
link   
reply to post by Wyn Hawks
 


Are you an active parent? We'll leave it at that for now.


edit on 24-8-2011 by intrepid because: To add "active".



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:32 PM
link   
reply to post by intrepid
 


...why is that even an issue?... yes, i'm an active parent and grandparent... happy now?...



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:36 PM
link   

Originally posted by Wyn Hawks
reply to post by intrepid
 


...why is that even an issue?... yes, i'm an active parent and grandparent... happy now?...


Actually yes. Make me realize that you have NO idea that the pressures that kids deal with today are greater than what we went through. Not that you would know. Check out that # on FB. If you can't find any compassion for that I'm not surprised that you have no problem with that book.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:45 PM
link   
reply to post by intrepid
 


...believe whatever you want, including that its okay for you to assault my character...



new topics

top topics



 
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join