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Religion, an ancient, political safety net?

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posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:19 AM
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I would first like to start off this thread with my beliefs. I beleive that the books of religion are meant to be used as history book, documenting important occurrences from our history of humanity. I am not trying to discredit any religious views, as they are opinionated by each person.

But is it possible, that at one moment in time, there was a period of civil unrest and loss of control from world governments. Now view this, telling people there is a creator and the only way to please him is to do good and have moralistic values and laws. He who does not obey them goes to hell, while he who does good shall not perish, but have ever lasting life in the kingdom of the creator...

The system works well in an ancient setting. People who frequently "sin" and break laws are pressured to think about their actions and decide to change their ways of evil influence on a society, while rulers can rest assured that crime and unrest is coming to a slow halt because of this new belief system... They are taught to never question the word of their religion, that alone provides a safety net for assuring bad actions will slow. Other civilizations hear about the effects of this system and try it on their kingdom as well. The secrets of this are kept within the government at the highest branch. The system keeps working through the ages. Why fix something that's not broken? A run away effect is caused and the ability for religion to control the masses is instilled into society. "in god we trust" on the dollar... Could be a subconscious reminder of the fact that they rely on the word to keep the masses straight from wrong doing.

It's just a theory in it's infancy. This could very well explain why most religions seem the same but have little nit picky details thrown in for a users specific country or area.

What you guys think about this?




posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by TLOCKE
 


I think you are on to something. I noticed reading the Codex of Hammurabi there were a great many levels of a fully functioning and ready made society of the Sumerians and every King and ruler had right by their side a Priest or a Holy Man with them and so I think they are inexorably entwined with the same mission of control..politicians, patricians and priests.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:30 AM
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God's law as derived from scripture is the ultimate safety net!

It's all any individual or society could need.

"For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ."- John 1:17

"For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments. And his commandments are not burdensome."
-1 John 5:3

"So the law is holy, and the commandment is holy and righteous and good." -Romans 7:12



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:39 AM
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Originally posted by Partygirl
God's law as derived from scripture is the ultimate safety net!

It's all any individual or society could need.

"For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ."- John 1:17

"For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments. And his commandments are not burdensome."
-1 John 5:3

"So the law is holy, and the commandment is holy and righteous and good." -Romans 7:12


I used to think that until I read the earliest writing of law.
Creation and the flood were rewritten from an earlier Sumerian story. If it was "Gods word" I don't think he would have had so many references and differences included between the freemen and the slaves. The aristocracy, the patricians and priests had a different set of laws for themselves although those were not in the Codex. No...this is no set of Holy Commandments. This is a power structure and a way to keep the slaves and the freemen in line. What I would like to know is who were those leaders and what remains of them today?

www.historyoflaw.info...
en.wikipedia.org...

The Code of Hammurabi is a well-preserved Babylonian law code, dating to ca. 1700 BC (short chronology). It is one of the oldest deciphered writings of significant length in the world. The sixth Babylonian king, Hammurabi, enacted the code, and partial copies exist on a human-sized stone stele and various clay tablets. The Code consists of 282 laws, with scaled punishments, adjusting "an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth" (lex talionis)[1] as graded depending on social status, of slave versus free man

edit on 24-8-2011 by newcovenant because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 02:40 AM
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reply to post by TLOCKE
 


I have spent a great deal of time researching religions because I was subjected to a Catholic education all my life.

I think you are on the right track here, but as with anything you can't make a sweeping generalization of all religions. Of course each persons interpretation will and should differ, but I find some of the Eastern Religions to ring much more true than the rest, and the same can be said of some of the primitive religions. In fact it seems to me that the more organized a religion is, the less it does for the person to help them along on this spiritual path. This is my yardstick for measuring the value of each religion, at least for me. However, as I said before each persons religious - or should we say spiritual progress must be a personal endeavor or it is doomed to fail. And it seems that each path can and does lead to God, it just depends on what is right for you, and what you are prepared for at that time. Obviously from this last statement I believe I reincarnation.

In fact The Upanishads is said to be the oldest scripture in the world, and I thought it was very interesting. Very non threatening to Christian viewpoints, and much more accepting than... Anyway, it relates that there is a tiny spark of God in each person, and that we should listen to that small, still voice inside of us. Of course it should be remembered that meditation is an everyday thing in that region. In fact I feel that it is their prayer, and probably closer to what prayer really is supposed to be.

I do have to correct you on one thing though, except for the Christians and the pagan religion of Mithra, hell does not exist. Others do talk of hades, but in those religions it was never a theme park for the wicked. Now this brings us to a question I think. Why would a pagan religion which worships the Sun, and a Christian religion that worships the Son, share something like belief in hell? Curious isn't it? Do they share anything else?

Well...



RESEMBLANCES BETWEEN MITHRAISM AND CHRISTIANITY

1. Both Mithras and Christ were portrayed as young and beardless; both sometimes appeared in the shepherd's role, and both saved mankind by performing sacrificial deeds.

2. Both Mithras and Christ had virgin births in the sense that they were conceived without any sexual union between man and woman. Christ's father was said to be God, while Mithras was said to have had no father or mother, having emerged as an adult from a large rock.

3. Both Mithraism and Christianity celebrated the birth of their god on the winter solstice, the 25th of December according to the Julian calendar. Both featured the sharing of presents, the use of Christmas trees with candles, and nativity scenes that included shepherds attracted by a sacred light. The special importance of this solstice ceremony to Mithraists would be indicated by the name Mithras, which derived from Meitras, which in Greek numerology refers to the number 365, the last day of the solar year at the winter solstice.

4. Both the Old Testament and Mithraic legend told of the first human couple having been created. Mithra supposedly kept a watchful eye over their descendents until Ahriman caused a draught that caused such thirst that they begged Mithra for water.

5. Both told of a major flood, in the case of Mithra through his having shot an arrow into a stone cliff to quench mankind's thirst. Unfortunately, the entire world's population was drowned in a flood produced by the water spout that gushed from the hole his arrow produced. One man alone (a Noah figure borrowed from the earlier Sumerian myth of Atrahasis) was warned in time and could therefore save himself and his cattle in an ark.

6. Both Mithraism and Christianity emphasized mankind's redemption resulting from a sacrificial death followed by the god's ascent to heaven. In the case of Christ, it was the god himself (or his son) who was sacrificed; in the case of Mithra, it was a sacred steer that Mithra sacrificed.

7. Both featured resurrection through sacrifice. Mithraism more obviously drew upon spring equinox fertility myths by depicting Mithra's sacrificial bull with a tail that consisted of sheaves of wheat that were supposedly scattered throughout the world once it was slaughtered. Also, the bull's blood formed the milky way, allowing human souls both to be born and to return to the heavens after death.

8. Both told of a Last Supper linked with the blood sacrifice whose symbolic recreation by eating bread and wine provided salvation for all worshippers. After Mithra killed the bull depicted in Mithraic art, he feasted upon it with the Sun God and other companions before ascending to the heavens in the sun god's chariot. The sequence was slightly different in the New Testament: Christ's Last Supper necessarily preceded his crucifixion rather than following it, after which he ascended to heaven.

9. Both emphasized purification through baptism, Mithraists by washing themselves in the blood of sacrificial oxen. While dying oxen bled to death on lattice floors built over their heads, initiates both drank and washed themselves with the blood that dripped on them.

10. Both featured secret temples located underground. For Christians it was a temporary expedient to avoid persecution, but for Mithraists it became a permanent institution, each small chapel, called a Mithraeum, having seated no more than fifty worshippers and having been constructed to point from east to west. Rounded ceilings were painted blue and imbedded with gemstones. There were no windows except for a few chapels in which tiny holes in the ceiling that had been bored to let in the light of certain stars at particular times of the year.

11. Both held Sunday to be sacred.

12. Both encouraged asceticism. Mithraists were expected to resist sensuality and to abstain from eating certain foods.

13. Both emphasized charity. Mithra was identified as the god of help who protected his worshippers, whatever their tribulations in life.

14. Last and probably least, both emphasized a rock, Mithra having been born from one and the Vatican having been built on one.


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Hmm...



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by TLOCKE
 


From the title, one person comes to mind:-

Rick Perry.



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