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Bizarre USGS Omission of Phase Data and Historic Seimicity on DC 5.8 Quake Suspicious

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posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by GAOTU789
First the CO one, I went and looked the USGS site and the Historical Seismicity for the area wasn't amongst the maps. Then this afternoon when I got home from work, I went to the USGS site again and looked at the info for the 5.8 and again, no Historical Seismicity. I found that really strange.


First thanks GAOTU for the applause.

And love yas all, but I don't understand why a few people now are saying they don't see the historical seismicity for the Colorado 5.3?

It is, and has been right here since the getgo:
neic.usgs.gov...

Right where it should be, in the maps tab of the quake description.




posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 10:49 PM
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Question about the historical maps.
Have they changed since the "blackout"?
This one,on a pdf file from 2006 shows them.
pubs.usgs.gov...
Just wondering.
edit on 23-8-2011 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:11 PM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


For the Virgina quake, there still is no historical seismicity map where it usually should be:

earthquake.usgs.gov...

And there never was one to this point, so not sure I totally understand your question, kdog...



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:15 PM
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LInk to what I think your after? It's been there all along, since a few minutes after the quake.

The summary -

Earthquake Summary Poster
Tectonic Summary

The Virginia earthquake of 2011 August 23 occurred as reverse faulting on a north or northeast-striking plane within a previously recognized seismic zone, the "Central Virginia Seismic Zone." The Central Virginia Seismic Zone has produced small and moderate earthquakes since at least the 18th century. The previous largest historical shock from the Central Virginia Seismic Zone occurred in 1875. The 1875 shock occurred before the invention of effective seismographs, but the felt area of the shock suggests that it had a magnitude of about 4.8. The 1875 earthquake shook bricks from chimneys, broke plaster and windows, and overturned furniture at several locations. A magnitude 4.5 earthquake on 2003, December 9, also produced minor damage.

Previous seismicity in the Central Virginia Seismic Zone has not been causally associated with mapped geologic faults. Previous, smaller, instrumentally recorded earthquakes from the Central Virginia Seismic Zone have had shallow focal depths (average depth about 8 km). They have had diverse focal mechanisms and have occurred over an area with length and width of about 120 km, rather than being aligned in a pattern that might suggest that they occurred on a single causative fault. Individual earthquakes within the Central Virginia Seismic Zone occur as the result of slip on faults that are much smaller than the overall dimensions of the zone. The dimensions of the individual fault that produced the 2011 August 23 earthquake will not be known until longer-term studies are done, but other earthquakes of similar magnitude typically involve slippage along fault segments that are 5 - 15 km long.

Earthquakes in the central and eastern U.S., although less frequent than in the western U.S., are typically felt over a much broader region. East of the Rockies, an earthquake can be felt over an area as much as ten times larger than a similar magnitude earthquake on the west coast. A magnitude 4.0 eastern U.S. earthquake typically can be felt at many places as far as 100 km (60 mi) from where it occurred, and it infrequently causes damage near its source. A magnitude 5.5 eastern U.S. earthquake usually can be felt as far as 500 km (300 mi) from where it occurred, and sometimes causes damage as far away as 40 km (25 mi).


Is that Seismic Hazard Map what you are looking for?



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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Your link takes me right to it? Maybe you have a browser malfunction?



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:27 PM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 


I appreciate you trying to help, but I don't think you're getting it.

Here is a recent 2.8 Oklahoma quake, and the maps tab:
earthquake.usgs.gov...

Do you see the map under there that says "Historical Seismicity" ???

That map is present on virtually every quake, especially if it is the US, and on 99% of the foreign quakes too.

It is not what you are thinking.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:34 PM
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Earthquake AND a hurricane.....I don't know what you guys over in Virginia are doing, but you need to stop. There won't be a Virginia left if you keep this up.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


It takes time to falsify these things. Just be patient.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


It takes time to falsify these things. Just be patient.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:48 PM
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I just looked at it and it was right there. I clicked on it and it took me to the map.

Then a minute later I clicked on it once more and now it won't take me there, but if I go in through the USGS site, I can still get too it. Perhaps they are getting to much traffic? I've looked at all the linked maps, including that one at least three times today and this is the first time I got an error page.

OK, now its gone from the link page but all the other relevant stuff is there. They are doing something with it. I was not hallucinating earlier that I know of
Like I said, maybe to many hits from all the hype.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


The link just came back again and its working now. Link



That is the one you mean?



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:55 PM
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Another small aftershock just hit.

BUT LORD FORBID I SHOULD SAY A GUESSED MAGNITUDE.



If the USGS is clueless how big they are and keep taking them off, putting them on, again, again, and again, then wtf.

Beats me.

250 microns/sec register at US.CBN. Confirmed at US.BLA, bout 9 microns/sec

To me that's another very small quake given proximity to station, like 2 to 2.5, but hey, what do I know.

And Blaine: yes, that's the map. Find me one for the DC 5.8 and I'll recommend you for applause.
edit on Wed Aug 24th 2011 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


It takes them a while to get all the data in and crunched. The initial data is just best guesses. Wait an hour and they will have better info.

That quake struck almost at the center of that seismic zone. Nothing weird about it.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 


Yeah well get this- phase data usually goes up right away. And they have it listed now for the 3.2 that just hit-
neic.usgs.gov...

So don't understand why it still isn't up for the 5.8.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:22 AM
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Now they aren't even listing any quakes for the 24th....they all disapeared.

Something is going on with the site itself, I think.

Another decent quake just hit colorado again, too.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:24 AM
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considering that they blacked out some data as well as also quickly stated the CO and VA quakes had no correlation (!), they're definitely (being ordered to?) covering up something from getting out to the public regarding recent quakes.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:32 AM
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Originally posted by billy197300
Earthquake AND a hurricane.....I don't know what you guys over in Virginia are doing, but you need to stop. There won't be a Virginia left if you keep this up.


Having lived here in Virginia for 5 years, I have been really concerned about my upcoming move back to California, where I lived previously for 40+ years, especially with all the potential doom and gloom some forecast for the Western US coast - Now I'm thinking it may be a safehaven!



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:50 AM
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After the big quake hit Haiti and we said prayers for the survivors, my little girl became afraid something like that would hit us here in Maryland and asked me if such a thing could happen here. At that time I looked up as much info as I could on the history of seismic activity here in the MD DC region. I read that Virginia had a history of activity and quakes that could be felt, but MD had no such history except for a single one over a hundred years ago and that the MD area was generally considered seismically inactive and stable, with only minor very localized tremors at times. Then I read more about the soil composition and all that stuff and it was all very reassuring that we were basically setting on very old settled rock and dirt that hadn't done much of note in recorded history. So I told my little girl, don't worry sweetie, that sort of thing doesn't happen here.
LOLOLOL! Last July we had the small one that still managed to make itself felt loud and clear, and today we had the one that rattled my daughter's toys off their shelves.

I'll tell you what makes me suspicious, we had that one last July and it was swept under the rug. It was a big event for our area yet the media clammed up about it pretty quickly. There wasn't that much of the usual talks with seismologists about what caused it. In a region that is not known for much moving and shaking except politically, I would have thought we'd have had more talk about that quake. But we didn't. It's only getting mentioned again because of this 5.8 quake.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:53 AM
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Hey there WestCoast and TrueAmerican ... how you two doing with all this confusion?

just thought i'd stop in and tell ya both, well done and keep up the good work

RSOE isn't even plotting the VA quake yet and the CO took forever to show up ... funny thing though, a recent 2.2 in NY is plotted
near albany & schenectady.
It is quite odd that the small one is there and the much larger one is not. RSOE EDIS

yes, the USGS info has been anything but consistent and reliable ... totally agree with ya there and am wondering if Oklahoma is really the place to 'watch' ... from what i'm seeing (world-wide), the St Lawrence region looks awfully vulnerable to this current pressure release. Between the snowpack, late melts, flooding, blah, blah, blah ... tis ripe for a rattle. wasn't it just a few months ago that Michigan noted and documented a ground swell around 5ft or so?



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:53 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 



off hand, (and seismology was a subject I only dabbled in there have been something on the order of 25 similar quakes, that data'll take a little combing.

a few handy feeds.

really earthquakes happen all the time, and in this particular region there's no real risk of subduction.

as for the relationship between colorado and virginia quakes, i'd say unlikely. this is a pretty decent resource for that sort of thing:

DTAM

as for the conversation about winds in the area, that'll get worse over the next few days, this is the us source
for that prediction.


edit on 24-8-2011 by notionfreely because: link check.



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