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Hurricane IRENE's Path

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posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 05:25 PM
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Prediction..........gotta go with DC, Virginia direct hit...............and on to NYC.

After the earthquake this is shaping up for a "wrath of God" type disaster.

Hope I am wrong. Seriously.




posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 05:29 PM
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A hurricane moving over, or the norheast of the eyewall, the Chesapeake Bay is not a good scenario. The water could possibly pile up and create a pretty nasty storm surge.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 05:35 PM
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Originally posted by MrWendal

Originally posted by St Udio
reply to post by louieprima
 


Depending on exactly where you are I would not be too worried about trees coming through your roof.

However, if you do have trees that close to you I would strongly suggest going outside and taking a close look at those trees.
Look for weak branches or anything that appears it may snap easily and cut those branches off yourself. Nothing worse than watching a window get taken out when you could have easily prevented it.



i'm with you on that area of precautions...


but like i say, the spindly pines that poise a risk to the house are ~60' tall... and i would need a cherry-picker to even get the dead limbs out of the way

and that scenario is presently out-of-my-budget.... let alone getting rid of the problem trees.(until later in the year)


i try to think and project the likely outcomes of risks... so i'm all over those possible preturberations (sp?) /
possibilities... much like a insurance guy looks at the 'odds' to set your rates. mostly called 'accutuionary tables' (sp?)

appreciate the concern

edit on 23-8-2011 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 07:29 PM
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reply to post by St Udio
 


Oh I was not suggesting cutting down the trees. If they are very sturdy and can withstand 100 mph winds, they could actually help offer your home some protection. I do suggest busting out a ladder and climbing up there taking a peek for weak branches that may easily snap due to high winds. Also keep power lines in mind. During Ike I had power lines up and down my street that were constantly throwing sparks as the wind kept making the lines touch. Of course you also want to clear any tree parts away from transformers as well. Last thing you want is a fire that cant be put out cause emergency services are hunkered down.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 07:48 PM
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Originally posted by Leo Strauss
Prediction..........gotta go with DC, Virginia direct hit...............and on to NYC.

After the earthquake this is shaping up for a "wrath of God" type disaster.

Hope I am wrong. Seriously.


For hurricanes my favorite site due to their accuracy is Weather Underground. They usually differ a bit from the Weather Channel but in my experience they are usually very very accurate. I usually base my decision to evacuate based on their projections.

A lot can happen between now and Sunday when this storm is expected to be in the DC area, but based on current projections, I would not be worried at all if I was in D.C.

Here is the current 5 day projection from weather underground 5 day projection
edit on 23-8-2011 by MrWendal because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 09:37 PM
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i dont even know why they bother with tracking programs,,they have changed so many times,,they dont have a clue ..



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 12:45 AM
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I hope and pray that everyone will be safe and sound. Here is what the National Geographic website has to say.

news.nationalgeographic.com...


Does anyone know why Hurricane's are almost always named after a female?



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:54 AM
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Originally posted by caladonea
Does anyone know why Hurricane's are almost always named after a female?


As the old joke goes, "Because they're not HIMicanes!"

More properly, perhaps the following will help:


Atlantic hurricanes have been named since 1950 with Able. 1953's Alice was the first real human-name storm. Traditionally male names have been included since 1979 with Bob. Eastern Pacific hurricanes have been named since 1960 with Annette.


Source



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 04:14 AM
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reply to post by caladonea
 


Because they are full of hot air and when they are finished with you they leave you battered and broke


Sorry I couldn't resist.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 05:20 AM
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I think the worst thing it could do is hug the coastline and stay strong...
which is what it looks like it might do.
I think the storm surge might get pretty intense if it follows the course it's taking and follows the coastline..

and well, katrinia hit about the same time of year....to the date!!!

which gives me an bad feeling about it...

as things look now, I wouldn't want to be in the NY subway when it comes through....
but it's still a ways away, might just take a sharp turn east and miss everything!



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by caladonea
Does anyone know why Hurricane's are almost always named after a female?

Do you have to ask?
Just kidding. But they rotate between boy names and girl names. The 2008 duo were both boys - Gustav and Ike,but it's true, the baddest ones of all seem to be girls - Betsy, Camille, Katrina, Rita. I guess Andrew was a doozy, too, but maybe he was a woman hurricane trapped in a male hurricane body.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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surprised its supposed to make it all the way up to New England.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 09:29 PM
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This has quite possibly been posted somewhere in the forums, but just in case you haven't seen it...

Here is an amazing view of Irene from space!

www.stuff.co.nz...



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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Some real tightening up visible in the most recent satellite pics. I'm thinking we'll see this hit Cat 4 before the end of today. Looks like it's going to smack the same area of North Carolina that always seems to get it (Cape Hatteras)....

Here on the West Coast of FL, seems like we'll just barely miss being in the outer bands of the storm.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:47 AM
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Well .... looks like it's gonna be an interesting weekend for me and mine. Im here on the eastern shore of maryland. Right now, i could spit and hit the next ocean wave that hits the shore. Im that close to the shore. Will be moving inland to escape the storm surge.

Just got word that Ocean City MD is evacuating. Doesn't take much of a storm to place south OC under water. Happened several times in just the last few years from nor-easters. Lived downtown on talbot street some years ago and a nor-easter put us underwater from a storm surge. My car was flooded and several nearby floated away in that storm.

So ... i have a feeling this one will be the worst yet!!! I'm prepping! Being a 'prepper' - I already have a lot on standby - just fine tuning things now and batten down the hatches for the high winds. I'm figuring at least 100-110 mph winds judging by the storm tracking. If it moves further west it'll go right over my pointy little head - kinda screwed then.

I'll see if I can sneak out and head back to the coast from inland and get some pics.
edit on 25-8-2011 by Emptiness Dancing because: just 4 fun



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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The Weather Channel and Weather Underground agree that Irene is likely to be threat to New England, and is unlikely to move eastward out to sea after making landfall on the Carolina coast. Dr. Jeff Masters, co-founder of Weather Underground wrote this in his blog:



Today, we have a hurricane over the Bahamas--Hurricane Irene--that threatens to be the Northeast's most dangerous storm since the 1938 hurricane.

Irene is capable of inundating portions of the coast under 10 - 15 feet of water, to the highest storm surge depths ever recorded. I strongly recommend that all residents of the mid-Atlantic and New England coast familiarize themselves with their storm surge risk.


I hope that everyone is taking this storm seriously, and my thoughts go out to those in Irene's path.

Side note: I'm amazed that good ol' ATS is not awash with Irene-DOOM threads.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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Yesterday the msnbc storm tracker had a lot of warnings about new england and a tornado map that included long island. Now, all the hype and the tornado map is gone. In fact, their tracker map shows the hurricane going from a cat2 on sunday morning to a tropical storm for NYC area. Yesterday it showed cat1 all the way to NYC. Am I being paranoid or are they down playing it because they can't evac millions of people from flood zones along the coast and inland?



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by St Udio
 


I have 5 60 ft pines in my yard. I only wish a hurricane would take one or two out. But it never happens. Isabel in 2006 took out thousands of trees from NC to MD but the biggest thing that fell in my yard were branches with a six inch diameter and of course mountains of pine needles. I am in the path of this storm. Hampton VA at 37.06N 76.37W just inside that little indent past Hatteras as you go north to the Virginia boarder. I can spit into the Chesapeake Bay from my yard and a river with access to the bay is one block away from my house or about 650 feet away. Isabel brought it within 240 feet of my house.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by VictorVonDoom
 


Hey Portsmouth, Hampton here. I am staying but I too get a bad feeling about this one. I hope its no worse than Isabel. That was inconvenient but the only real damage was all the trees. Remember how some wooded areas looked like blast zones, with all the trees down and pointing in the same direction? If that's the worst we get it will be ok. I will watch the advisaries.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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Originally posted by louieprima
reply to post by VictorVonDoom
 

Booze is a must in any hurricane situation!
(Can you tell I'm from Louisiana?)

Sir, I believe that is a rule that applies throughout the southern hurricane states. I know its practically mandatory here in Virginia.



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