Production in the world's 2 largest oil fields rapidly coming to an end - Soon

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posted on Aug, 20 2004 @ 09:56 AM
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Production in the world's 2 largest oil fields rapidly coming to an end SOON

All the giant fields, such as those in the Middle East, have already been discovered.
These giants are relatively easy to find.
The last major oil field, Cantarell, off Mexico's shore, was discovered in 1976.

Current status of the two largest oil fields in the world

#1 Ghawar, Saudi Arabia
...
#2 Cantarell, off Mexico's shore
...
(more later, if nobody here is able / willing to provide the information)



[edit on 20-8-2004 by MattMarriott]
Mod Edit: All Caps – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 5/10/2008 by Gools]




posted on Aug, 20 2004 @ 10:12 AM
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More than 40,000 oil fields are scattered around the globe, on land and offshore. The largest are the Ghawar Field in Saudi Arabia and the Burgan Field in Kuwait, with more than 60 billion barrels (10 km³) estimated in each.

This is a list of the oil fields in the world.


www.wordiq.com...



posted on Aug, 20 2004 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043

The largest are the Ghawar Field in Saudi Arabia and the Burgan Field in Kuwait,


I'm talking about REAL data, not about "estimated reserves".

Just one click from your link :
www.wordiq.com...

Cantarell complex produced 1.16M barrels/day of oil in 1981. However the production rate dropped to 1M barrels/day in 1995. Nitrogen injection projects, started in 1997, increased the production rate to 1.6M barrels/day which ranks Cantarell the second largest productive oil field in the world behind Ghawar Field in Saudi Arabia.

=======
BTW, that text already contains a key hint about the subject of this thread ...



posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 06:55 AM
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IF you started drilling through the link till the end (the nitrogene explosions didn't make you stick your head in the sand) THEN this should be NO BIT of a surprise to you :

OPEC production data released by tanker tracker Petrologistics lent some support to prices, said Tom Bentz, an analyst at BNP Paribas Futures in New York.

In its latest report, the Paris-based Petrologistics said OPEC's output of crude oil in July averaged slightly below 29.5 million barrels a day, down slightly from June's 29.6 million barrels a day, mainly because of a decline in output from Saudi Arabia.

Petrologistics had previously expected the OPEC to pump more than 30 million barrels a day in July.

Despite pledges to increase its output, Saudi Arabia, OPEC's largest producer and exporter, produced about 9.13 million barrels a day of oil in July, down from 9.52 million barrels a day in June, according to Petrologistics.

The figures came as a bit of a surprise to analysts. In recent months, OPEC members had been producing nearly flat out to meet red-hot global oil demand, and officials have pledged to hike their output to keep the market supplied.

The production hike has cut into OPEC's unused capacity, and analysts have expressed concern that OPEC wouldn't be able to fill any supply gap caused by a supply disruption in a major oil producer such as Iraq or Russia.

www.ecommercetimes.com...



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 10:12 AM
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Another thing to take into account when looking at figures on the capacity of an oil field is the fact that the amount stated is not the amount that is extractable. Most oil fields only extract about 50-75% of their oil because after a certain point it becomes more expensive to extract a barrel of oil than it is to sell it.

Therefore the amount of oil that is extractable in this day and age of cost feasibility is MUCH less than the stated numbers. We have reached peak oil, and if something is not done soon, we will be past an energy crisis and into an energy DISASTER



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 11:28 AM
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Well the politicans could care less.... they worry too much about gaining oil profits over finding alternative energy.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 02:51 PM
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This is no secret and we've been talking about it coming since the 70's. Expensive energy is not a disaster, it just means things will cost more. Change is never easy and we will have no choice but to make changes. Stop with the doom & gloom talk & dump your money in to places that will prosper when the oil gets more expensive then the alternatives.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 05:13 PM
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People are always saying this.

If oil was (which it isn't) running out in areas we could drill elsewhere or drill deeper.

With in a decade Hydrogen will me the "Norm" so who gives a damn anyway.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 05:28 PM
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I have heard in the past that America has realised the fact that oil will soon become sparse and has huge underground resovoirs full of the stuff and that they have enough stocked away to last their military 15 years. Dont know if there is any truth in it i read it on a rival site about a year ago.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 05:41 PM
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I have a question. There are going to be large pockets of "nothingness" or "voids" once the oil is drilled out, and I have heard that they fill these pockets with something else to prevent collapse, is this right? Also, if they do fill them, how do they know that the stuff they fill them with has the same strength and consistency as the oil and will prevent these viods from collapsing? These issues have bothered me for awhile, and NOT getting into a discussion of politics or environment, is it possible for massive cave-ins to occur world wide?

Anyone know?



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by thesaint
I have heard in the past that America has realised the fact that oil will soon become sparse and has huge underground resovoirs full of the stuff and that they have enough stocked away to last their military 15 years. Dont know if there is any truth in it i read it on a rival site about a year ago.



I doubt 15 years, but yeah alot is stowed away. and you can look as much on the net as you want, and you will never find the real amount stored here, because its classified.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 06:00 PM
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Originally posted by Jazzerman
I have a question. There are going to be large pockets of "nothingness" or "voids" once the oil is drilled out, and I have heard that they fill these pockets with something else to prevent collapse, is this right?
...
Anyone know?


As far as I know they don't fill them with anything. They just leave large methane pockets, which is bad. I could be wrong though... I know they USED to just leave the pockets and seal them off. Alot of these pockets are so far beneath the ground, and I believe (not sure) that the walls of the chambers have no issues of collapse.

If I remember right, some of the old oil sites are now being pumped for methane (as fuel). I heard this somewhere in conversation, so I'm not sure how viable it is.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 07:56 PM
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Originally posted by MattMarriott
Production in the world's 2 largest oil fields rapidly coming to an end SOON


What makes you say that?


Originally posted by thesaint
America has realised the fact that oil will soon become sparse and has huge underground resovoirs full of the stuff and that they have enough stocked away to last their military 15 years.


You are thinking probably of the strategic oil reserve. From what I understand, its not vast sums of oil stored undground. Its sort of a excess in the amount of oil purchased, or something like that, oil that is bought, but not used (note that this doesn't mean that they buy say, and extra barrel, and lock it in a warehouse. They buy the extrabarrels, and put them into the market at the same rate that they are purchasing new extra barrels. Actually I think that they are buying slightly more 'extra barrels' than they are putting into the market. In this way the 'reserve' is continuously growing. but its not a centralized stockpile or something.).

Now, I had origianly thought that, since its called a 'Strategic' reserve, that it was meant to be used only if, say, there is an embargo, and we are in a war, and we need fuel for the military. Apparently not. Its a resevrve that collected with the intention of releasing it in case of an embargo and the price of gasoline for the consumer gets too high. It was started after that old arab oil embargo from the carter years.


There are going to be large pockets of "nothingness" or "voids" once the oil is drilled out

No. The oil is not sitting in caverns. Its in porespace. Removing oil and draining pore space in rock does affect it, so you are right about that, but its not like a sink hole like they have in florida and elsewhere. Water is also contained underground in pore spaces, not caverns.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
No. The oil is not sitting in caverns. Its in porespace. Removing oil and draining pore space in rock does affect it, so you are right about that, but its not like a sink hole like they have in florida and elsewhere. Water is also contained underground in pore spaces, not caverns.


Thanks for the information. One last question to you...would it be possible for a collapse? I would think that even though it is "pore space" there will still be missing elements where the oil used to be, and that would provide grounds for a collapse of some sort. I really hope that you say I am wrong though, as I'm not to familiar with this sort of vocation.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 08:27 PM
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Alot of the oil is never used in the world as it is too expensive to get it out.The deposits of oil sands (oil shale) in the United States are massive.

Tar sands are impregnated sands that yield mixtures of liquid hydrocarbon and require further processing other than mechanical blending before becoming finished petroleum products.

With the United States domestic decline in oil production, it is important to research possible tar sand production in America (Alaska).

An engineering study was done between the University of Alabama and the Department of Energy. This engineering study provided a preliminary design of a commercial processing facility to beneficiate 39,956 tons per day of run-of -mine eastern oil shale to produce 4.38million tons per year of concentrate. The report included a process plants design recovery of kerogen at 92%, which with `hydroretorting' would produce approximately 20,000 barrels of oil a day.

This could become very important in the future. Ofcourse if they dont release there cheap Hydrogen fuel cells before that ever happens. Big Oil will just change to Big Hydrogen so it wont really matter they will not let their power just slip away from them.

ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu...



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 08:30 PM
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Has anyone else here ever come across the theory that
oil is in fact a selfrenewing resource? I was recently
researching Peak Oil when I came across an article
which stated that the chemical composition of crude
oil does not have its source in living things, but is instead
a product of the interactions between the upper level
of the earth's interior and the earth's crust.
(I have forgotten the source, but if I come across
it again, I will post a link)
I have also heard a theory which states that there were
never enough living things on earth to produce the biomass
necessary to produce the amount of oil that humans
have ALREADY used.






[edit on 8/23/2004 by jdster]



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 09:20 PM
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Originally posted by Jazzerman
I would think that even though it is "pore space" there will still be missing elements where the oil used to be, and that would provide grounds for a collapse of some sort.


I think for the most part you'd be right, tho it would depend on different things of course. In loose sands having liquid drained out of pore space is more destructive than in lithified rock, but as far as I know there isn't any real danger of oil fields significantly collapseing.


jdster:
the chemical composition of crude oil does not have its source in living things, but is instead a product of the interactions between the upper level of the earth's interior and the earth's crust.


As far as I understand it, oil is only contained in the crust. If it were produced by some process other than the currently understood one, then geologists and paleontologists wouldn't be able to use the methods they have to find it in the first place I should think.


I have also heard a theory which states that there were
never enough living things on earth to produce the biomass
necessary to produce the amount of oil that humans
have ALREADY used.


Don't beleive everything you hear. That entire idea is, interesting. Life has been around for lets pretend only 3 and a half billion years. The vast majority of species that have ever existed have gone extinct. Just imagine the entire biomass of the earth right now, repeated hundred of thousands of times in the deep past. All the plants, and ocean going plankton and forams and nanofossils and others that turn into oil. There is defintiely far more then enough biomass to account for, what, not even a hundred years of high oil consumption right?



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 10:15 PM
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Originally posted by Jazzerman
Thanks for the information. One last question to you...would it be possible for a collapse? I would think that even though it is "pore space" there will still be missing elements where the oil used to be, and that would provide grounds for a collapse of some sort. I really hope that you say I am wrong though, as I'm not to familiar with this sort of vocation.


It is true that petroleum is contained in the pore space of rock formations, as is most groundwater. And yes, the land surface does subside when pore fluids are extracted excessively, but first the subsurface formation is damaged, sometimes ruining the porosity of the source rock. Surficial subsidence follows, though the time-frame is variable.

Santa Barbara, CA experienced so much subsidence in the 1960's (directly a result of offshore oil extraction) that a large seawall had to be built to prevent the ocean from flooding huge areas. And subsidence-related surface fracturing is occurring at this time in Arizona over a large area due to excessive groundwater extraction. Additional examples are from all over the world, but I apologize for not posting links (I'm short of time at present). However, I have a high degree of confidence in my assertions as I am a Licensed Professional Geologist with more than a decade of experience beyond college. Certainly though, the proof is literally at your fingertips as you read this.
(search: "land subsidence")

[spelling and clarification edit]

[edit on 23-8-2004 by Aeon10101110]



posted on Sep, 28 2004 @ 01:25 AM
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Originally posted by Nygdan

Originally posted by MattMarriott
Production in the world's 2 largest oil fields rapidly coming to an end SOON

What makes you say that?

Originally posted by thesaint
America has realized the fact that oil will soon become sparse and has huge underground reservoirs full of the stuff and that they have enough stocked away to last their military 15 years.


You are thinking probably of the strategic oil reserve. From what I understand, its not vast sums of oil stored underground. .



What I know is it is vast volumes of oil stored underground. It is purchased by the government and placed in emptied salt mines along the Gulf Coast and sold to producers in times of crisis. Now is a crisis!
So the Government buys cheap and sells high. Capitalism at it's finest.
Last I knew the reserves amounted to enough to operate the country for six months. That was about 20 years ago, by now the amount may have been increased, but certainly not for 15 years.
There are other reserves such as the western side of the North Slope the oil is in the ground and is only to be drilled for in a time of war. It is the U.S. Naval Reserve.

TUT



September 23, 2004
Department of Energy Announces Negotiations for Loan of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve
DOE announced that it intends to enter into negotiations to make available a limited quantity of crude oil from the SPR to help relieve physical shortages of crude oil supplies in the Gulf of Mexico following recent hurricanes

www.fe.doe.gov...


and here is a little about the theory that oil and gas are renewable sources of energy




The debate about cooking up hydrocarbons keeps getting hotter.

Some scientists insist that all petroleum comes from abiogenic processes, with hydrocarbon development occurring in the Earth's mantle.

Most geochemists and petroleum geologists remain convinced that crude oil and natural gas have organic origins.

Look for this dispute to intensify in 2003, with new heat coming from an unexpected venue. In June, AAPG's typically sleepy Hedberg Conference could be the spark that sets off scientific fireworks.

Hedberg conferences address topics proposed by AAPG's Research Committee. They take place in informal settings, with attendance limited to 80-100 persons.

On June 9-12, however, a Hedberg Conference will be held in London with the theme "Origin of Petroleum -- Biogenic and/or Abiogenic and Its Significance in Hydrocarbon Exploration and Production
www.aapg.org...





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