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Scientists claim bacteria fossils are more than 3.4 billion years old (Australia)

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posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 06:03 PM
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Some interesting news from Western Australia.





SCIENTISTS in Western Australia have uncovered fossils which they say are the oldest evidence of life on Earth. A team of researchers from the University of WA and Britain's Oxford University say they have proof that the microscopic fossils, found at Strelley Pool near Port Hedland, are more than 3.4 billion years old. Read more: www.news.com.au... 6081#ixzz1VnluDDXI



news.com.au

I never thought it would have been that long ago, (3.4 billion)
edit on 22-8-2011 by Violence because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by Violence
Some interesting news from Western Australia.





SCIENTISTS in Western Australia have uncovered fossils which they say are the oldest evidence of life on Earth. A team of researchers from the University of WA and Britain's Oxford University say they have proof that the microscopic fossils, found at Strelley Pool near Port Hedland, are more than 3.4 billion years old. Read more: www.news.com.au... 6081#ixzz1VnluDDXI



news.com.au

I never thought it would have been that long ago, (3.4 billion)
edit on 22-8-2011 by Violence because: (no reason given)



Im actually not really surprised. Bacteria and viruses have got to be one of the most dominant, longest living species we have ever seen on this planet. We are here for them I think lol Neat find and a good addition to earths life history.

edit on 22-8-2011 by topherman420 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by Violence
 


Great find S&F!

I'm surprised your post highlighting such a major discovery hasn't attracted more attention!



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 03:03 AM
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Something i always found strange/amazing/puzzling about bacteria is that they reproduce by splitting without another mixing in to make a new. Esstentially the "new" bacteria is the "old" one that is just split into two, so bacteria are immortal in a sense as the following bacteria are still just the original split into a gazillion parts. As the article states "such bacteria are still alive today", would that mean that there is a bacteria that's 3.4 billion years old?



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 02:25 AM
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Originally posted by Insomniac
reply to post by Violence
 


Great find S&F!

I'm surprised your post highlighting such a major discovery hasn't attracted more attention!


Unfortunately most people are interested in conspiracies, than cold hard facts.



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