It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Mile High Mountain In The Netherlands?

page: 2
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 03:04 AM
link   
They have enough bacon, make a mountain out of that!!

My question would be how he hell can something so heavy and high be stable?

I would worry about a mountain slide, I wouldnt be happy living near that thing.




posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 05:55 AM
link   



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 07:55 AM
link   
reply to post by ototheb85
 


I wonder if the ground is strong enough for all that weight, they may make a mile high mountain that ends up as another 200 metres hill.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 08:06 AM
link   

Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by ototheb85
 


I wonder if the ground is strong enough for all that weight, they may make a mile high mountain that ends up as another 200 metres hill.


Well the ride down might be fun for some thrill seekers



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 08:09 AM
link   
I heard this on the news a few days ago, i like the idea.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 12:41 PM
link   
I am interested in how they are going to make "cliffs for climbing" out of dirt, rocks, and rubble without it being a masonary block wall with preset anchorpoints. Nice for little kids I guess.

Even solid granite mountains have nasty erosion problems. With 31+ inches yearly in this area, and no real dry-season, constant heavy machinery maintence and rebuilding of slides will prevent this being profitable if the end result could be anything close to the artists rendition (which is very unrealistic but pretty). At this size and material composition if the slope is >27 degrees catastrophic failure is predictable. Made with solid stone throughout, it doesn't work at the angles shown in the conceptual drawing.

www.guardians.net...

Add in vibrational settling of rainwater groundseep voids from road traffic and machinery and yes, you could end up with a gently sloping mound a mile high but many more miles in cross-section. Hardly a proper mountain. Because the base compressional rate is exponential, not cummulative.

Maybe with reinforced concrete they could accomplish this but this:

en.wikipedia.org...

Cost over 20 billion dollars, and by comparison is just a molehill

edit on 23-8-2011 by twinmommy38 because: spelling as usual ...lol



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 04:24 AM
link   
reply to post by twinmommy38
 


spoil sport
Let them try at least!



new topics

top topics



 
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join