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3000 fish dead in murfreesboro pond

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posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 09:44 AM
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i know there are a thousand mass animal death threads, and i've read my fair share of them, but i don't remember ever seeing anyone speak about the lack of oxygen causing the fish death...

www.newschannel5.com...




"That's a common phenomenon in Middle Tennessee lakes, rivers, streams, and ponds," he said. "The warmer the temperature, the less oxygen the water can hold.


that doesn't sound good, not enough oxygen in the water? i understand the temperature issue, but it has been extremely warm here lately in the south east of this continent... anyways, i just wanted to add yet another dead animal thread, since this one is quite close to home, and the un-funny thing about it, it wasn't even that extremely hot that day, not as hot as it has been other days here lately...




posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 09:49 AM
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reply to post by schitzoandro
 


It is called a dead zone. Most large bodies of water have them. Lake Erie has one and we get fish kills every single year.
I believe the dead zones get bigger when the algea blooms grow from the heat. It doesn't have to be hot for this to occur though.
edit on 22-8-2011 by kimish because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 09:52 AM
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Happens almost every summer many places in Denmark. These pictures is what happens when theres to little oxygene in the water and the population off green algea increase.






edit on 22-8-2011 by Mimir because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by Mimir
 


i understand, it is not just that one day the fish go to school and there isn't enough oxygen for them to breathe, more like algae has steadily been growing and all of sudden the depletion takes effect. that would make sense especially when there are 3000 fish trying to all get the oxygen...



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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Yeah.... all the animal mass deaths are kinda scary, I mean, when is there gonna be a mass human death? Were animals too!!!!



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 10:07 AM
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Poor fishes, there do seem to be lots dying.

The oil spills coating the ocean floor due to an additive seems to be contributing to the dead zones.

Jellyfish are more than thriving though. Pity jellyfish due not seem to benefit the fish much, nor us.

Soon there may be nothing in the oceans but jellyfish. A new phase of evolution could be underway.

The jellyfish are even thriving in fresh water apparently.

What will it mean for the future? The fishing industry is already affected in some areas due to nets being full of jellies. How wide spread it is I don't know.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by schitzoandro
reply to post by Mimir
 


i understand, it is not just that one day the fish go to school and there isn't enough oxygen for them to breathe, more like algae has steadily been growing and all of sudden the depletion takes effect. that would make sense especially when there are 3000 fish trying to all get the oxygen...


Yes.

And it's actually a complex mechanism. Algae produce oxygene with photosynthesis under normal conditions its the main source for oxygen in the water.


Water can hold a limited amount of oxygen. That is determined by atmospheric pressure, temperature and salinity. In a natural setting, oxygen is added to water by atmospheric diffusion at the surface, by wind circulation (augmented surface diffusion) and by photosynthesis (oxygen produced by phytoplankton or algae). Photosynthesis accounts for most of the oxygen in water. The oxygen content of water increases with increasing atmospheric pressure and decreasing temperature and salinity. The amount of oxygen in water is measured as milligrams per liter (mg/l) dissolved oxygen


But when the tempreture increase the algae gets better conditions to increase in numbers. Now "suddenly" the sun is blocked for a few days and a "funny" thing occurs, the algae dies sinks to the bottom and start decaying. The process of decaying algae consume the oxygen in the water, and your fish die.

If the water contains enough algae before the cover of the sun, this can happen in less than a day, but only when the algae had the conditions and the time to grow in numbers.


Sudden death of phytoplankton or algal bloom, "bloom crash", may result from insufficient light (e.g. cloud cover) for photosynthesis, inadequate pond nutrients (a bloom too dense to be supported by available nutrients and oxygen) and/or bloom senescence (the plant cell line becomes too old to continue reproduction). Oxygen is consumed or depleted when dead phytoplankton/algae decay. During the nighttime hours, a dense phytoplankton bloom can remove all oxygen from the water for respiration (to breathe) alone. When a bloom crash occurs, the water appears to have become "black" or clear overnight.

LOW OXYGEN AND POND AERATION
edit on 22-8-2011 by Mimir because: (no reason given)



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