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I've been playing so far many games in a span of around 20 years and wonder if it would be easy to

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posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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build patches that for shooter games would for those past ones that utilise medipaks instead of those more recent ones that have slow rebuild of power that is better than looking for medipaks and that is that where I wonder if a rebuilding patch of that sequence would be possible easily.?
edit on 21-8-2011 by MichelJCardin because: (no reason given)
I mean that is it possible to create patches that tranform older games that use medipaks ; to use the same style as newer games that use the system of getting shot slows you down and eventually kills you and slowly you regain your streinght?
edit on 21-8-2011 by MichelJCardin because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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I'm not quite sure what you're trying to ask, but are you asking if it is possible to create a real life instant healing patch?



posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by MichelJCardin
 


GRAMMMMMAAAR NAZI ARE HEER



posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by MichelJCardin
 


I'd hold off on that. You may need to speak to the writers. There may be issues with the physics engine, there might not be enough pixels.

Failing that, I'd try wording it again so someone can understand what you said, because woop woop woop I sure dont have a clue!




posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 08:45 PM
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I think that he is asking how to rewrite part of a video game. for instance in call of duty when your character is injured instead of your health slowly regaining health you just take a health pack. am I right and if so i have no clue but kinda seems pointless.



posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by theblackirish7
 


Not sure, COD1 had health packs and if you didnt get to them you were a goner. COD2 is where they started to go for the autoheal. I cant see any reason other than executive decision that would cause the change.

As for the OP, I'm still not sure, but if it's related to what we're talking about, the only reason they are made to heal this way in games is simply up to the people making the game. Autoheal or healthpacks. There is no reason why a mod cannot be written for a suitably capable game to give it healthpacks in game... or vice versa.






posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 10:31 PM
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What he's asking is if it is possible to turn the challenging engaging first person shooters of long ago
into the easy, run and gun skilless pieces of crap we have today but replacing the healthpack with a regenerating
health system like Call of duty.

The answer is yes, it is 100% possible.
But you aren't likely to find them because video game modders like to have fun, you need to mod it yourself.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 02:22 AM
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reply to post by Segador
 


That's what I meant and it is because I am just sick of looking for health packs I guess.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 10:42 PM
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reply to post by MichelJCardin
 


It's definitely possible, but it would probably be a lot of work for most games, unless you had the original source code. One example of this would be for Doom; when Doom 3 came out, they released the source code for Doom 1 (and 2 I think) for free, so anybody can go and mess around with it if they want.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 05:32 AM
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The ability to switch from using health kits to having a slowly regenerating health bar would vary from game to game. There are a number of factors including whether or not any mod tools were ever released for the game in question and how the health function is implemented in the game.

Depending on how the code for each game functions, it may be as simple as editing a file in wordpad or as difficult as rewriting source code. It all depends.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 05:43 AM
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reply to post by MichelJCardin
 


it's called a mod.


Mod or modification is a term generally applied to personal computer games (PC games), especially first-person shooters, role-playing games and real-time strategy games. Mods are made by the general public or a developer, and can be entirely new games in themselves, but mods are not standalone software and require the user to have the original release in order to run. They can include new items, weapons, characters, enemies, models, textures, levels, story lines, music, and game modes. They also usually take place in unique locations. They can be single-player or multiplayer. Mods that add new content to the underlying game are often called partial conversions, while mods that create an entirely new game are called total conversions and mods that fix bugs are called unofficial patches.
Games running on a PC are often designed with change in mind, consequently allowing modern computer games to be modified by gamers without much difficulty. These mods can add extra replay value and interest. The Internet provides an inexpensive medium to promote and distribute mods, and they have become an increasingly important factor in the commercial success of some games. Developers such as id Software, Valve Software, Bethesda Softworks, Firaxis, Crytek, The Creative Assembly and Epic Games provide extensive tools and documentation to assist mod makers, leveraging the potential success brought in by a popular mod like Counter-Strike.
Mods can significantly outshine and/or continue the success of the original game, even when it is becoming dated. In those cases, players might have to clarify that they are referring to the unmodified game when talking about playing a game. In some cases the term vanilla is used make this distinction, "vanilla Battlefield 1942", for example, refers to the original, unmodified game. For vanilla games, prefix "v" or "V" is commonly used together with the game title acronym, e.g., VQ3 stands for "vanilla Quake 3".
As early as the 1980s, computer game mods have also been used for the sole purpose of creating art, as opposed to an actual game. This can include recording in-game action as a movie, as well as attempting to reproduce real-life areas inside a game with no regard for game play value. See artistic computer game modification, machinima and demoscene.


en.wikipedia.org...(video_gaming)



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