Maple trees dropping leaves left and right.

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posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 12:39 PM
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Originally posted by DerbyCityLights
I live in Louisville Ky and travel to Grayson County about twice a month. Every Maple tree I have seen has been beautiful and healthy this year. Do you guys have some kind of infestation going on up in Canada?

Good question, I have no idea really what the cause is if it is indeed just one cause.
I live in Ontario right up against the Michigan boarder, we had one poster from Montreal seeing the same thing so its a big area for sure.
Regards, Iwinder




posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by njl51
 

Yes the Emerald Ash borer beetle, they are responsible for the demise of almost all the Ash trees here and in the States as well.
Michigan for sure.
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


My maple trees, as well as all of my other types of trees, still have their green leaves. But, in years past, from time to time, the leaves turned early, and also didn't have their usual bright colors. And, yes, it was due to heat stress. Those times we had a drought. This summer, though, we've had plenty of rain. Of course it's August here, so the grass is brown and dying. Yay!! I don't have to mow as much. And, yes, it's normal, whether wet or not, for my grass to turn brown in August.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 01:02 PM
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Originally posted by kyred
reply to post by Iwinder
 


My maple trees, as well as all of my other types of trees, still have their green leaves. But, in years past, from time to time, the leaves turned early, and also didn't have their usual bright colors. And, yes, it was due to heat stress. Those times we had a drought. This summer, though, we've had plenty of rain. Of course it's August here, so the grass is brown and dying. Yay!! I don't have to mow as much. And, yes, it's normal, whether wet or not, for my grass to turn brown in August.



Thanks for the reply, the thing here is they are not "turning early" they are dropping heaps of brown crispy leaves.
At the rate they are dropping here, we will not have any leaves left to turn colour at all.
This started in late July about three weeks in and has just escalated to the point of ridiculous.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by Heartisblack
 


I too love the winter, but after about 90 days of slush and people who don't know how to drive in that weather...90 days is about all I can take.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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Here in the south-west tip of Ontario we're starting to get cooler nights which is normal for August, but the days are still hot. I noticed the other afternoon that even tho the temp wasn't all that high, the sun felt almost unbearably hot on the skin; to the point that I gave up doing any work outside in the sun. No it wasn't just an excuse,


Excess radiation along with the rays? That might explain the crispy brown leaves. My neighbour and I were talking just yesterday about how dry the ground is even with the rains we've been getting. It seems like something more than just regular sun is burning up and drying out the ground and vegetation.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by wayno
Here in the south-west tip of Ontario we're starting to get cooler nights which is normal for August, but the days are still hot. I noticed the other afternoon that even tho the temp wasn't all that high, the sun felt almost unbearably hot on the skin; to the point that I gave up doing any work outside in the sun. No it wasn't just an excuse,


Excess radiation along with the rays? That might explain the crispy brown leaves. My neighbour and I were talking just yesterday about how dry the ground is even with the rains we've been getting. It seems like something more than just regular sun is burning up and drying out the ground and vegetation.

I am really leaning towards the sun being responsible for this as I have said in earlier posts. But have nothing to back that up with but just my own thinking and observations.
I agree 100% that the sun is very uncomfortable when it hits your skin now.
Drive down the road and take notice at bus stops, you will see people standing under trees and seeking shade as best they can.
20 years ago they would be laying on the grass on the boulevard catching some rays while they wait for the bus.
Good points and thanks for adding to this thread.
Regards, Iwinder
edit on 22-8-2011 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 01:40 PM
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Originally posted by momonmiko
reply to post by Iwinder
 


That's so ironic. I saw the same thing today in the morning while walking to the metro to get to work. In Montreal it's happening too, nothing is falling yet, but i saw the leaves and they look kind of burned... brown color... it's starting to worry me a lot...



Thanks for this information, Montreal is a long way from here so I am stunned by the scope of this thing.
This is not normal and we must try to find out what is causing this.
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 02:01 PM
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Here in central Illinois the trees are looking green, perhaps not quite as green as normal but fairly lush regardless. I too think the sun has something to do with it, which of course that coupled with Fukishima spells no good.

Speaking of the sun, has anyone else seen the film Knowing? They too were dealing with ever increasing heat...just an idea to ponder.


Regards,
W.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 02:03 PM
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We've had a strange drought here in central Texas no rain for like months. Temps averaging 106 steady for weeks. It's like it's being manipulated like this on purpose.
edit on 22-8-2011 by tetsuoatx because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Here in central NY We have many maples - but they look green and summery still...

If I see a change, I will return to report.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 02:15 PM
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Has anyone tried google for an answer....I found this




Leaf Scorch:

Maple leaves often show a browning or drying at the outer margin of the leaf or in the areas between the veins in mid to late summer. The areas near the veins generally remain green; however in extreme cases the entire leaf may dry and fall prematurely. This may lead to scorch caused when leaves lose water more rapidly than moisture can be replaced from the soil. This can be caused by too little water in the soil or a physical restriction of the root.

The symptoms of leaf scorch usually appear during hot, dry, windy weather. Trees growing along streets or in areas where the roots are restricted seem to suffer most. Scorch itself seldom kills a tree, but may weaken it to the point where insects or disease can further injure it. Leaf scorch is best controlled by deep watering during dry periods.

See GreenShare Factsheet on leafscorch for more information.


Please go here for more info:

www.uri.edu...



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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August was a strange month for the southern hemisphere, too. Even though it is still Winter we have reached the mid 20's (Celsius). We have had quite a severe snowstorm few weeks ago and last week Monday, after having a great warm weekend it snowed again. I am not used to the one day sunshine, walking in shorts & having a braai (barbeque) & then 18 hours later it snows. All i know is, it is not normal South African weather.

We had snow back in '81 and then in '07, and this year twice in 4 weeks . Hailstorms & thunderstorms in Winter? That just doesn't or used to happen in South Africa. This Winter gave us South Africans a taste of weather which told us climate change is upon us.
edit on 8/22/2011 by qonone because: spelling



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Dude I live in southern ontario too and our mape trees are losing their leaves like crazy aso. It must be from the heat, those sun rays have been deadly hot this summer. Very strange....



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Trees be dropping leaves here in north Texas as well, dying. I wish it would rain sometime. It's been too long since it dropped last.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Maybe this is related to the shift in Magnetic North? If the sun is in the same spot at this time of the year, but the pole is moving further into Siberia, then the other side of the world would "think" it was "moving north". Since mineralized water allows electricity to travel through it, (salt water = good / distilled = bad) then it would make a decent hypothesis that trees can be affected by the pole shift and that the leaves falling early show the effect.

cheers, long time lurker.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Funny you mention this, I noticed the same thing here in north Texas about a month ago. All the trees are losing their leaves as though it's fall.

I figured it was due to the bad drought we're going through but it seems like we have a drought every summer (though usually not this bad), so who knows.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by relocator
Has anyone tried google for an answer....I found this




Leaf Scorch:

Maple leaves often show a browning or drying at the outer margin of the leaf or in the areas between the veins in mid to late summer. The areas near the veins generally remain green; however in extreme cases the entire leaf may dry and fall prematurely. This may lead to scorch caused when leaves lose water more rapidly than moisture can be replaced from the soil. This can be caused by too little water in the soil or a physical restriction of the root.

The symptoms of leaf scorch usually appear during hot, dry, windy weather. Trees growing along streets or in areas where the roots are restricted seem to suffer most. Scorch itself seldom kills a tree, but may weaken it to the point where insects or disease can further injure it. Leaf scorch is best controlled by deep watering during dry periods.

See GreenShare Factsheet on leafscorch for more information.


Please go here for more info:

www.uri.edu...


Very good information there, It makes a lot of sense in some of these situations.
However it does not explain my situation as my tree roots are not blocked and this is so wide spread I doubt even 5 % of the maples here have blocked roots.
We are talking millions of trees here and I can't see millions suffering from blocked roots all of a sudden.
Thanks very much for the input and it does make some sense,
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 05:20 PM
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Just because the well is working doesn't mean the tree might have water loss, the well could be getting water below the root level.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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Originally posted by qonone
August was a strange month for the southern hemisphere, too. Even though it is still Winter we have reached the mid 20's (Celsius). We have had quite a severe snowstorm few weeks ago and last week Monday, after having a great warm weekend it snowed again. I am not used to the one day sunshine, walking in shorts & having a braai (barbeque) & then 18 hours later it snows. All i know is, it is not normal South African weather.

We had snow back in '81 and then in '07, and this year twice in 4 weeks . Hailstorms & thunderstorms in Winter? That just doesn't or used to happen in South Africa. This Winter gave us South Africans a taste of weather which told us climate change is upon us.
edit on 8/22/2011 by qonone because: spelling

I hear you loud and clear here, same here but it is summer time......two tornadoes in the last month here alone and the last time we had a significant tornado here was about 20 years ago.
Heavy wind every day and coming from every direction imaginable all at once.
Regards, Iwinder





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