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an animals perception of time

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posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 07:32 AM
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its well known that animals adapt to their environments, and we have seen that different species will deal with the same problem in different ways.
is it possible that different animals perceive time differently. for example a small bird would live its life in what we would consider 'fast forward'

time is just an environmental condition so i don’t see why it would be different for different things.
and its something that can be used for evolutional advantage so obviously life would try and manipulate it. for example if an animal had to move quickly it could slow down its processes to emphasis effort or skill in action




posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 07:46 AM
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reply to post by dilapidated
 


I know that dogs have no time perception. If I went to the bathroom, my dog would wait outside the door and greet me as if I had been gone all day.



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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Originally posted by dilapidated
its well known that animals adapt to their environments, and we have seen that different species will deal with the same problem in different ways.
is it possible that different animals perceive time differently. for example a small bird would live its life in what we would consider 'fast forward'

time is just an environmental condition so i don’t see why it would be different for different things.
and its something that can be used for evolutional advantage so obviously life would try and manipulate it. for example if an animal had to move quickly it could slow down its processes to emphasis effort or skill in action




The general rule here is...the smaller the animal, the shorter the life, the faster the heartbeat, the faster the perception of time.
Percieving time faster is something we, as humans, have been adapting to for a while. It used to just be a function of age. The older you get, the faster time passes...sort of thing. But, it seems, time is actually speeding up, or our perception of it is slowing down, so that it seems it is passing quicker. Whichever;, the nature of time is changing.
Animals, it seems, do experience time differently...albeit, the fact that, your pet always knows when its time for dinner...he he...
Akushla



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by TDawgRex
reply to post by dilapidated
 


I know that dogs have no time perception. If I went to the bathroom, my dog would wait outside the door and greet me as if I had been gone all day.


i had a Yorkie that at 9pm every night she wanted to go outside to go pipi before nighty time.

i now have a house rabbit who thinks breakfast is at 5am and diner at 4pm.

so they have some kind of internal clock.

i know what you mean with dogs, the separation anxiety, i thought you would never come back.
5 minutes or 12 hours, seem to be the same for a dog.



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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if releasing something XYZ into our brain would make us perceive time becoming so slow, maybe animals got such ability too.



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 08:29 AM
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Time is relative...

If you're 50 years old, 1 year passes you by in 1/50th of what you know.

If you're 5 years old, 1 year takes 1/5th of your entire life to pass by. It seems much longer.

Who knows if the same holds true for animals.



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 08:48 AM
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I remember watching a documentary about this a few years back.

I remember a specific part of the documentary, "a fly's view of the world". Everything in a fly's world moves extremely slowly - and, as a result, the fly is able to react with what we perceive as lightning speeds. Imagine for example a fly swatter coming towards the fly - seems ridiculously fast to us, but to the fly, it's slow enough for it to react and fly away fast. Darned things!

On the other side of the coin, I remember the alligator's view of the world, which was the exact opposite of the fly's. I remember it lurking below the surface of the water, watching the other animals at the watering hole - their movements were so fast that, to the alligator, everything was a blur.

Tis all very fascinating!



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by dilapidated
 


Time does not differ apon any circumstances what so ever. For instance a bird taken again where it being of house one of one of injury surviving ; I see no conscept difference in such aspect but their lifespan may if I doubt they should even notice the passing of their elder; that may have effect on it nut I doubt that a snail has a different passing of time any more or less than any other creature. One aspect that is relevent is time of incosciousness as sleeping is wasting our time here .



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