It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Logic Flaws in the Star Wars Trilogy (long)

page: 1
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:10 PM
link   
Logic Flaws in the Star Wars Trilogy (long)

You don't notice these things as a kid, but as a critical thinking adult, they become obvious to you. Here is a long thorough list of plotholes and logic flaws in the original Star Wars trilogy that defy basic logic and common sense. Feel free to add any of your own.

Star Wars A New Hope

- When the Falcon was captured by the Death Star tractor beam, and the Imperials found it empty because Han and his party were hiding in the smuggling compartments, why didn't the Imperials use their life form detection devices, like on Star Trek? They should have such capabilities, since at the beginning of the movie, when C3PO and R2D2 were in the escape pod fleeing the captured Rebel cruiser, the Star Destroyer personnel said, "There goes another one. Wait, hold your fire. There's no life forms. It must have short circuited." Then later an Imperial officer told Vader aboard the captured Rebel cruiser, "An escape pod was jettisoned during the fighting. But no life forms were aboard." This indicated that the Imperials did have life form detection capability. So why wasn't it used on the Falcon in the Death Star?

Furthermore, the pilot of the Tie Fighter that the Falcon was chasing to the Death Star should have reported that the Falcon was following it like a manned craft, not like a ship on automatic pilot, which should have told the Imperials that there were pilots on board.

- Before the Falcon was captured by the Death Star, Governor Tarkin ordered his Imperial officers to execute Princess Leia immediately, after she lied to them about the location of the Rebel base. So how could Han, Luke, Ben and Chewie have so much time to sneak into the Death Star and rescue Princess Leia, if she was scheduled to be "executed immediately"? I guess "immediately" must be a long time in the Star Wars universe. lol

- There was no reason why the Death Star personnel would let Han, Luke, Leia, Chewie and the droids escape on the Millenium Falcon. They could have easily deactivated the ship or hauled it away, rather than leaving it intact and operable in the hangar bay with only a few guards around it. That is too contrived and convenient.

- When our heroes went down into the trash compactor room on the Death Star, after the shootout in the prison bay, the Imperials obviously knew they were down there, since they disappeared and blew open the trash chute. So when they set the walls of the trash compactor to close in on them, and R2D2 managed to stop it and open the exit door, there should have been guards outside the door to immediately capture them, since their location was already known. But there weren't. That was never explained.

- When the Falcon escaped the Death Star, even though the tractor beam was deactivated, the Death Star could still have easily shot it out of space, or immediately sent fighters to destroy it. There's no way a gigantic space station could be that easy to escape from. It should have many things in its arsenal besides its tractor beam.

- In a military space station, areas where you can deactivate things should not be so easy to get into. They are usually locked and heavily guarded. So Ben Kenobi should not have been able to get to that control panel to deactivate the tractor beam that easily, by simply walking through a hallway and out onto a balcony.

- During the light saber duel between Ben Kenobi and Darth Vader, Kenobi gives up when a few stormtroopers arrive and point their weapons at him, and lets Vader slay him and vanishes. There was no reason for him to give up like that. In the prequels, Jedis can deflect lasers with their light sabers very easily, like a routine breeze in the wind. If Kenobi could deflect lasers so easily during his youth, there was no reason why he couldn't do it again in that scene and continue to fight Vader, or flee and rejoin Han's party in their escape. His sacrifice seemed senseless. Furthermore, he was in a personal duel with Vader and the stormtroopers were not supposed to interfere.

- Furthermore, during that same duel with Vader, Kenobi's light saber suddenly turns into a glass stick, revealing the prop that it was. That scene should have been cut out, but was left in for some reason.

- The stolen data tapes of the Death Star that the Imperials were after the whole movie made no sense. If the Rebels can analyze it and find a weakness in the Death Star so quickly and easily, why couldn't the Imperials have done the same long ago? I mean, what's to stop them from analyzing the technical blueprint of their own Death Star, finding the same weakness in the exhaust port, and plugging it up or fixing it so that it doesn't cause a chain reaction? A simple realignment or plugging of the pipes could have easily fixed the problem. This was never explained, of course, because obviously, if they had done that, the Rebels would have had no chance. lol

Since there was no logical reason to believe that the Rebels were more technologically advanced than the Imperials were, the Imperials should therefore have been able to discover this weakness in the Death Star long ago and fixed it. Then there would have been no need to chase the Rebel cruiser at the beginning to try to retrieve the stolen data tapes. The Death Star would have been invincible and the Rebels would have had no chance, and the movie would have sucked I guess. lol

- When the Death Star headed for the Rebel base on one of Yavin's moons by tracking the Falcon, there was no reason for it to stay around and risk itself. Once it found the location of the Rebel base, it could have sent out thousands of fighters to destroy the Rebel base, or dispatched ground troops to capture it, or called the Imperial fleet to destroy it, and then fled the scene out of harm's way. There was no need to try to destroy the entire moon that the base was on, to destroy the Rebel base, and incur risk upon itself. Since the Imperials knew that the Rebels were planning to find a weakness in the stolen data tapes that could destroy the Death Star, they knew that the Death Star was at risk, so they should have had it flee and jump into hyperspace, as soon as the location of the Rebel base was discovered.

Furthermore, the Imperial fleet should have followed the Death Star for protection and backup, in case the Rebels succeeded in destroying the Death Star. There was no reason not to have the Imperial fleet tag along in this huge pivotal battle that could end the war and the Rebellion.

- After the Death Star was destroyed, the Imperial fleet should have arrived and finished off the Rebel base. Yet, at the end of the movie, the Rebels have enough time for a relaxing medal of honor ceremony for Han and Luke. In it, they do not look like they are in a rush to leave at all, before the Imperial fleet arrives.

- If Darth Vader was Luke's father, then why did Vader try to shoot Luke down during the Death Star trench run? Couldn't he feel that Luke was his son, using the Force?

- During the trench run, Vader locked onto Luke's fighter and fired his lasers. They should have hit Luke's X-Wing and destroyed it, just as it did to the other fighters. Yet Luke's fighter was not hit and it was never explained why. Instead, Han's Falcon comes and destroys one of Vader's guard Tie Fighters, and knocks out the other, hurling Vader's fighter into space. But no explanation or cause for Vader's miss was given.

Also, the Death Star should have had thousands of Tie Fighters and cannons protecting it during this battle, so Han's ship should not have been able to approach the Death Star and enter its trenches so easily. You can't approach a giant technologically advanced space station the size of a moon that easily. Its cannons and defenses should easily be able to blow targets out of the space around it.

- A space station the size of a moon ought to have thousands of fighters, not just a dozen like was shown in this movie.

- When the X-Wing squadron approached the Death Star, it was very gradual. It took time for them to get to it, and then into the trenches. Yet, after Luke successfully fires into the exhaust port, he, Han, and a few other fighters, suddenly flee and get really far away from the Death Star, in just a few seconds, so that they are safely out of range when it blows up. If they can get that far in a few seconds, why didn't the whole Rebel squadron get into the trenches in just a few seconds when it was arriving too? And again, the Death Star should have had countless laser canons and missiles which should have blown away the escaping fighters anyway.

- On Tatooine, there was no reason for the stormtroopers to have killed Luke's Uncle and Aunt that he lived with and worked for. If they wanted those two droids and the stolen data plans they carried, which was traced to their home, they would have held his Uncle and Aunt hostage until Luke returned and surrendered the droids. That would have been the logical move. But killing them and then moving on was senseless. It accomplished nothing and did not help their objective. I guess Lucas was in a rush to cut off Luke's remaining obligations to his relatives on Tatooine so he could go away with Kenobi and join the Rebellion. And when Lucas is in a rush, any senseless thing will suffice. That seems to be the pattern.

The Empire Strikes Back

- When the Imperial fleet attacked the Rebel base on Hoth, most of the Rebels ended up escaping in transport ships, even though Hoth was surrounded by the Imperial fleet. These transport ships should have been destroyed or captured. Yet they all just slipped past the fleet, after one Rebel ion cannon disabled one Imperial Star Destroyer. WTF?

- If the ion cannon of the Rebel base was powerful enough to take out Star Destroyers all the way out in space, then why didn't the Rebels just point it at the giant Snow Walkers approaching the base on the ground? It should easily have taken out the Snow Walkers and made it difficult or impossible for the Empire to attack the base by ground. Furthermore, if the Rebel base was protected by an impenetrable force field, as the Imperial officer told Vader, then how could the ion canon fire through it? I've never heard of a "one-way force field" before. lol

- In the original Star Wars movie, it was established that fighters cannot go too far out into space on their own, when Han Solo said that the Tie Fighter they were following, headed for the Death Star, could not have gotten so far into space on its own. Furthermore, the X-Wings were shown to be fueling in the Rebel base hangar bay before the Death Star attack. So how then, in Empire Strikes Back, did Luke's X-Wing go from Hoth to Dagobah, and then all the way to Cloud City? Where did it refuel?

- Also, the Falcon's hyperdrive was inoperative until the end of the movie. So how did it travel all the way from Hoth to the asteroid belt and then to Cloud City on its jet engines or sublight speed alone? Wouldn't that have taken thousands or millions of years? lol. Star systems are usually many light years apart, so the Falcon would have had to travel at faster than light to get to other star systems. But if it's only traveling on jet propulsion, wouldn't it have taken forever, beyond a human lifetime?

- As in the first Star Wars movie, when the Imperials captured the Falcon at Cloud City, why did they leave it operable and unguarded? Why didn't they deactivate it or haul it away? Didn't they learn from their mistake in the first movie when they escaped the Death Star so easily? Or did Darth Vader have amnesia? lol. How convenient of the Imperials to always leave the Falcon operable and virtually unguarded so that our heroes can jump into it and escape. They've done it twice now.

When they left Cloud City, Vader asked the Imperial officer if his men deactivated the hyperdrive on the Millenium Falcon, and he says yes. But why would they only deactivate the hyperdrive rather than the whole ship itself? What kind of dumbass strategy was that? Furthermore, why didn't they put a tracking device on the Falcon, like they did in the first Star Wars movie, so that they could track it all the way to the Rebel base or fleet again?

Also, when Lando, Leia, Chewie and the droids were escaping Cloud City and shooting at the stormtroopers, the Imperials should have known that they would head for the Falcon and either guard it, haul it away, or render it inoperable. Then Lando would have had to direct them to another ship for their getaway.

- Chewbacca was huge and moved slowly. So how could any stormtrooper repeatedly fail to hit him? Hitting him should be as easy as hitting a big door.

- After Han and his party in the Falcon left the asteroid belt and the monster inside one of them, why didn't they simply catch up to the Rebel fleet, instead of going to Cloud City for repairs and risking what might happen there? Obviously they must have known where the Rebel fleet was, since Leia and Lando went directly to it after escaping Cloud City. If their inoperable hyperdrive wouldn't allow that, then how did it allow them to go all the way to Cloud City, which must have been light years away? Or why couldn't they have called the Rebel fleet and asked to be picked up?

Return of the Jedi

Oh boy, this movie, which I consider the worst of the trilogy, has so many flaws and blunders that listing them is going to be tedious. Nothing made sense in this movie. So here it goes...

- The beginning part was stupid. Why would Jabba the Hut keep Han Solo frozen? If you want revenge on someone, you don't keep them asleep. You wake them up and punish them and torture them. Or you make them repay their debts and then either release them, kill them, or torture them, depending on the score you want to settle.

- And why would Jabba keep Han, Leia and Luke prisoner so he could take them out into the desert and throw them into that mouth pit? Why not just execute them on the spot or imprison them? Why take such a chance so that they could escape?

- During the battle on the barge, why did Bobba Fett hit the sand dune and then roll into the mouth pit? Sand is not ice. You do not slide down it against your will. Anyone who has walked on a sand dune or tried to roll down one knows that you have to MAKE yourself roll down one. You do not slide down one like ice. When you hit a sand dune, you immediately stop. You do not roll down unless you make the effort to roll down. It looks like Lucas doesn't know anything about sand. Or he just wants the movie to be stupid.

- Why would Bobba Fett not take out Han Solo first, who is right next to him, rather than Luke? A blind Han Solo would be easy to take out in a second. Instead, he ignores Han and concentrates on Luke, while Han accidentally hits Bobba Fett's jet pack with some pole, causing it to ignite and propel him into the sand dune for that unrealistic roll into the mouth pit mentioned above. A great fighter or bounty hunter does not get defeated by an accidental move from a blind man. That's silly and has never happened in history. It's also a cheap insult on the villains too.

- How can Luke stand in the middle of the barge in broad daylight, surrounded by enemies, and not get hit? Anyone can shoot him from behind. A light saber does not provide 360 degree protection.

- How did Leia choke Jabba the Hutt to death with chains so easily? He was huge. How could he be that weak to have a woman choke him so easily? Furthermore, why would Jabba tie chains around himself so that anyone can choke him with it, including his female slave Leia? Also, wouldn't a super gangster like Jabba the Hut have some body guards around him?

- Why would firing the barge's deck gun at the barge's deck destroy the whole barge and explode it? Why would Jabba have a barge that was so easy to blow up with just one shot from its own deck gun? That is way too contrived. It seems that this movie was designed for the brainless.

Next, the whole Death Star/Endor battle scene was ridiculous and senseless. It was like a cartoon. I guess you don't have to have common sense to be a movie director.

- Why would the new Death Star need to have a shield generator outside of it? Ships and space stations usually have shields generated from the INSIDE, not outside. Why would they have a shield generated outside, which could be easily destroyed? Furthermore, why would the Emperor place himself in a Death Star that was so easy to destroy?

- The Rebel strategy for taking out the shield generator was nonexistent. Why send a small assault team to try to take it out, not knowing what would happen or how heavily guarded it was or even how to get into it? There was no real plan or basis for this strategy. I mean, what if they arrived and the shield generator was heavily guarded by an army and had many exterior guns? What would their small assault team do then? Try to take them out in a shootout? Infiltrate them? Recruit wild animals? lol. They simply had no real reliable plan. Yet they banked the survival of the whole Rebel fleet and the outcome of the war, on this one ground mission which technically had no chance of succeeding?! WTF? That was weird.

Yet in spite of this, Lando kept telling Admiral Ackbar to have faith in Han completing his mission and getting that shield down, when there was no logical basis for such faith, as explained above. So, the survival of the whole Rebel fleet was at stake and they were banking on Han's small assault team taking out a heavily guarded shield generator with no strategy or method? WTF? That sounds suicidal to me. No one would rely on such a strategy or bank a whole war on it.

It would have been more quick and efficient to simply fire missiles at the shield generator to take it out, or try to use fighters to secretly attack and destroy it. But oh wait, I guess if they did that, then our heroes wouldn't have had the opportunity to meet those stupid Ewoks, and the film wouldn't have appealed to children. lol

- When Han and the Rebel assault team in the shuttle transmitted the clearance code to the Imperial fleet to get to Endor, Vader sensed that his son Luke was on board the shuttle. He even told the Emperor about it afterward. So he knew right there that there was a Rebel assault force in the shuttle. Yet he let the shuttle land anyway. That was a huge tactical blunder that made no sense, and cost the Empire the whole war. Why would he let them land and put the shield generator at risk? Why not immediately capture the shuttle and take his son to the Emperor to be converted, if that was his plan? Or put the tractor beam on them without warning? Why bank on Luke coming to Vader of his own will on Endor, if he didn't have to, and could have captured them right there? Vader's decision to allow the shuttle to land was completely baseless and reckless. It also cost the Empire the whole war. Antagonists always do the stupidest things.

- The battle on Endor was ridiculous, goofy and impossible. The Ewoks had no chance against the stormtroopers. How could the Ewok arrows pierce the armor of the stormtroopers? If their armor can't stop arrows and stones, then what's the point of them wearing it, which slows down their movement and heats them up (unless there is a cooling system inside)? Arrows are no match for laser blasters and walking machines.

- Swinging logs cannot destroy the metal hull of AT Walkers like paper. Metal does not collapse like paper from colliding with logs. Furthermore, a big Snow Walker, like those used on Hoth in Empire Strikes Back, was shown on Endor at night, but never used during the Ewok battle. I wonder why. Maybe cause the Ewoks would have had no way of destroying it? lol

- When Han and his party were captured by the stormtroopers at the shield generator, there was no need to take them outside to stand around. What was the point of that? To have them look at all the stormtroopers and gloat in their defeat? Why didn't they just execute them, and eliminate the risk that threatened their whole war?

- During the shootout outside the shield generator, Han and Leia stood in the corner of the closed doorway of the shield generator, totally unprotected and exposed in the open. They were no more protected than if one were to stand in the corner of an open room. This means that they were sitting ducks and anyone could have shot them. Yet none of the stormtroopers hiding in the forest could hit them?! WTF? That is unbelievable and implausible. They should have been easily gunned down in seconds. I guess Lucas expects us to subdue reason and believe that two people standing out in the open cannot get hit by trained military soldiers surrounding them. Uh huh.

- When Leia was hit in the shoulder during the shootout outside the shield generator, Han gets distracted and the stormtroopers come up behind them and order them to surrender, which they get out of after Leia just shoots them down. Yeah right. Again, why didn't the stormtroopers just shoot them when they had the chance, since they posed a high risk and threat to the shield generator, on which the whole war hinged on? They should have immediately shot Solo in the back and finished them both. I guess the Empire just wasn't meant to win...

- The way Han Solo and his party finally capture the shield generator defied basic logic. Han poses as an AT Walker driver, using a captured AT Walker, and asks the shield generator personnel to send reinforcements to pursue the fleeing Ewoks and Rebels. When reinforcements are sent out, they are immediately ambushed and captured, and the door is left open for Han and his party to enter into the shield generator and blow it up. Now, there are a number of obvious problems with this:

First, why would an AT Walker driver be giving orders to the personnel of the shield generator? He takes orders. He doesn't give them. And the personnel in the generator should have refused his request anyway, for the next reason.

Second, the shield generator personnel's primary duty was to protect the shield generator and keep it running. It was their highest priority, since the whole war with the Rebels hinged on the shield generator's protection of the Death Star (well according to the logic of this movie that is). Therefore, there was no sense in sending out most of the personnel inside out to chase Ewoks and Rebels deep in the woods, leaving the shield generator unprotected and undermanned, when their primary duty was to protect it. That made zero sense and was a suicidal move.

Logically, the shield generator manager should have replied to Han's request with the following, "That won't be necessary. Just let them go and return to the shield generator to help guard it. The protection of the generator is our highest priority right now."

At that point, Han would have no way to get into the shield generator except by trying to destroy it with the AT Walker, or placing the explosive charges on the outside of the generator. But then again, shouldn't a crucial shield generator have some exterior weapons, armor or defensive capability, or at least a protective force field of its own?

Third, when the squad of Imperial personnel left the shield generator only to be surrounded by Ewoks, there was no reason for them to surrender. They could have immediately fired their laser weapons at the Ewoks and at Han Solo too. Arrows are no match for laser blasters. If arrows were better, why would anyone be using lasers? lol. And plus, if the Imperial squad knew that giving up the shield generator meant that the Empire would lose the war, wouldn't they have gone for broke anyway and started firing at the Ewoks and Solo? Han's strategy made no sense and should not have worked.

Furthermore, when the Imperial personnel inside the generator saw that the squad sent out was immediately captured, with their security cameras, why didn't they immediately close the door? And why didn't the door close by itself after the squad went outside? Surely the Imperials weren't planning on leaving that crucial door open were they? Geez. Also, how did all those Ewoks get on top of the generator for this stupid ambush? Weren't there security cameras outside that let the Imperials see what's going on outside?

As you can see, the capture of the shield generator contained multiple errors of basic logic. Sheesh. George Lucas must suck at any kind of strategy. If he were a military commander, he'd probably be the worst in history. He probably could not even beat the computer at chess on level one. The strategy and actions used in Return of the Jedi were obviously meant for the most brainless of people.

Next, the space battle above Endor also defied basic logic.

- The Imperial fleet obviously outnumbered, outsized and outgunned the Rebel fleet. Admiral Ackbar even admitted this when he said to Lando, "At that range our ships won't last long against those Star Destroyers." Yet it was never explained why the Imperial fleet didn't finish off the Rebel fleet. Even after the Death Star was destroyed and the Emperor was dead, nothing still prevented them from finishing off the Rebel fleet.

We are expected to assume that after the Emperor died, the entire Empire fled and disbanded. Yeah right. Didn't the Emperor have a successor, or did he plan that after he died, his Empire would be no more? Presidents and Kings have always had successors, to continue their nation or empire.

But either way, even without an Emperor, the Imperials should have finished the Rebels off anyway out of pride and vengeance. That way, they could go home and say, "We lost our new Death Star and Emperor, but we destroyed the entire Rebel fleet and won the war. All we need now is a new Emperor to continue the Empire. Since we successfully crushed the Rebellion, our Emperor did not die in vain." Wouldn't that have been far more honorable and glorious than going home and saying in shame, "We lost our new Death Star and Emperor, so we fled and gave up and lost the war. The Empire is no more."

Um Lucas, hello! Have you ever tried putting yourself in the Empire's shoes? I guess when Lucas wants closure in a movie, he rushes it any way he can, even in the most nonsensical way.

- When the Death Star's shield was down, why didn't the Imperials close off the tunnels that the Rebel fighters were flying through to get to the main reactor? Why make it so easy for fighters to fly through the Death Star and blow it up? Haven't the Imperials ever heard of a "door or wall" before?

- The way the Imperial flagship Executor got destroyed by crashing into the Death Star after a Rebel fighter crashed into its bridge, was cheap, cheesy, implausible, and defied the laws of physics, for a number of reasons.

First, you can't destroy a ship the size of the Executor, which looked to be at least ten times the size of a Star Destroyer (based on the scene in Empire Strikes Back when Star Destroyers moved alongside and under it, see here: www.theforce.net...), by simply crashing a fighter into its bridge. Geez. Can you sink an aircraft carrier by simply crashing a fighter plane into its bridge? No, you can't. You have to inflict a lot more damage than that to sink a carrier. So this made no sense.

Second, a huge flagship the size of ten Star Destroyers should have a ton of defensive capabilities, including shields, armor, lasers, backup systems, etc. and should be extremely difficult to destroy or incapacitate. A few outmatched, outnumbered and outgunned Rebel fighters isn't going to take out a thing like that. Come on now. Furthermore, such a ship should have backup navigation systems.

Third, even if you destroy a ship's navigation system (by crashing a fighter into its bridge in this case), it will simply glide onward and eventually get lost in space. It will not fall down like a plane from the sky in Earth's atmosphere. Come on now. Moreover, the Death Star does not produce gravity, and even if it did, it would not be strong enough to pull down a gigantic ship like that. Obviously, Lucas thinks that Earth's sky and space have the same properties and physics, or thinks that we are dumb enough to think that. Either way, he insults the viewer's intelligence.

Again, this scene was made for the stupid and brainless. Lucas obviously has low respect for your intelligence. Either that, or he has low intelligence himself or cheesy taste. I guess when Lucas wants something out of the way, whether it be a Galactic Empire or a flagship the size of ten Star Destroyers, he will do it any way he can, even if it insults your intelligence. That seems to be his pattern all right.

- When the Death Star's shields were down, and the Rebel fighters were flying through the tunnels toward the main reactor, none of the Imperial personnel contacted the Emperor to tell him to evacuate to his escape pod. Gee I guess they didn't really care about him. Wouldn't the Emperor leave his intercom on, in case his forces lost or the Death Star was in danger, so that he would be notified?

- In the Emperor's room on the Death Star, there is a bottomless pit next to it, so that he can be thrown into it at the end by Darth Vader, who has no other way to kill the Emperor. Gee how convenient. Do rulers and kings like to sit near bottomless pits? Does Julius Caesar or King George sit around bottomless pits while giving out orders, so that someone who wants to assassinate them can simply throw them into it? Well, not in our world. But in the Star Wars universe, I guess they do. How bizarre.

- How could Luke endure the Emperor's lightning attack for so long, and then get up with normal strength afterward, yet Darth Vader only got hit with it for a few seconds while carrying the Emperor into the bottomless pit, and as a result, began dying right after?

- When the Death Star is about to be blown up, Luke takes Vader, his father, from the Emperor's room all the way to hangar bay to flee in a shuttle. Now, how did he get someone as big and heavy as Vader all that way? Did he drag him on the ground? If so, that would take a long time and they would not have escaped in time. Or did he carry him in his arms? If so, that would strain his arms and slow him down. Either way, why didn't any Imperials who saw him arrest or capture him?

Whew. I think this list is done for now. Sorry that was so long, but I hope you enjoyed reading this list of logic flaws, which you probably never thought about or realized while watching the Star Wars trilogy. Feel free to add any more if you like.




posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:14 PM
link   
You have far too much time on your hands.

Easy answer: Its in the script.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:19 PM
link   
- When the Falcon was captured by the Death Star tractor beam, and the Imperials found it empty because Han and his party were hiding in the smuggling compartments, why didn't the Imperials use their life form detection devices, like on Star Trek? They should have such capabilities, since at the beginning of the movie, when C3PO and R2D2 were in the escape pod fleeing the captured Rebel cruiser, the Star Destroyer personnel said, "There goes another one. Wait, hold your fire. There's no life forms. It must have short circuited." Then later an Imperial officer told Vader aboard the captured Rebel cruiser, "An escape pod was jettisoned during the fighting. But no life forms were aboard." This indicated that the Imperials did have life form detection capability. So why wasn't it used on the Falcon in the Death Star?
reply to post by WWu777
 


The only one im going to say anything about...they are assembling a probe on the Falcon to do just that when Han and Luke jumped them then called out for the storm troopers to come help them assemble said probe...the big red box ona mag lift the two nazi wannabees are taking aboard in the beginning of the scene...Nozzle...

edit on 12/08/11 by LanternOfDiogenes because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:19 PM
link   
Try doing one of these for the Matrix trilogy. That'll really give you a hard time.

Or The Butterfly Effect(Or most movies including time travel). It was like 2 years ago I saw that, and I still find myself contemplating flaws in it on practically a daily basis. No joke.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:21 PM
link   
I have one answer that explains everything in the films that doesn't make sense. When anything amiss happens it was probably because of the disturbances caused by the dark side.

That is all.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:21 PM
link   

Originally posted by Lono1
You have far too much time on your hands.

Easy answer: Its in the script.


Obviously (for anyone that knows me on the forum) I am prone to dropping a punchline here and there when a thread like this comes up... but, I say kudos to the OP, because writing and producing a movie script is a tough deal, and the person you are trying to please is the audience that is watching it.

George Lucas made a great epic, but the OP is right, there are a lot of holes. I do believe filmmakers will appreciate both sides of the audience, the ones that enjoy what it is, and the ones that pick out the flaws. Both groups are what makes Directors keep directing...



S&F



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:26 PM
link   
Haha do one for the Green Lantern



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:29 PM
link   

Originally posted by LanternOfDiogenes


The only one im going to say anything about...they are assembling a probe on the Falcon to do just that when Han and Luke jumped them then called out for the storm troopers to come help them assemble said probe...the big red box ona mag lift the two nazi wannabees are taking aboard in the beginning of the scene...Nozzle...

edit on 12/08/11 by LanternOfDiogenes because: (no reason given)


Just to add to this - before doing the scan, the initial inspection of the ship, they commented that a couple of the life pods had been jettisoned from the falcon.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:35 PM
link   
Still reading it..just wanted to drop a star and flag for the effort



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 10:37 PM
link   

Originally posted by WWu777
why didn't the Imperials use their life form detection devices, like on Star Trek? They should have such capabilities, since at the beginning of the movie, when C3PO and R2D2 were in the escape pod fleeing the captured Rebel cruiser, the Star Destroyer personnel said, "There goes another one. Wait, hold your fire. There's no life forms.


I think in this case they didn't scan the ship for life-forms when they captured it because they just assumed it had people on it. They were more concerned with capturing it. Once they did and couldn't find the crew, they needed to take a separate scan machine onto the Falcon. Since the ship was surrounded by troopers a broad based scan wouldn't be effective. They needed something more precise.



Originally posted by WWu777
There was no reason why the Death Star personnel would let Han, Luke, Leia, Chewie and the droids escape on the Millenium Falcon.

Vader had a tracking device placed on the ship to find the rebel hideout. He says this in the movie. It was part of Vader's plan.


Originally posted by WWu777
So when they set the walls of the trash compactor to close in on them, and R2D2 managed to stop it and open the exit door, there should have been guards outside the door to immediately capture them, since their location was already known.

I think the compactor was just on auto-pilot. It wasn't compacting them because their location was known. It was just full of trash.



Originally posted by WWu777
- When the Falcon escaped the Death Star, even though the tractor beam was deactivated, the Death Star could still have easily shot it out of space, or immediately sent fighters to destroy it.

Again, Vader let them go. He says this clearly in the movie.



Originally posted by WWu777
So Ben Kenobi should not have been able to get to that control panel to deactivate the tractor beam that easily, by simply walking through a hallway and out onto a balcony.

I was always amused at how well Kenobi knew his way around the Death Star. That never made sense.


Originally posted by WWu777
- During the light saber duel between Ben Kenobi and Darth Vader, Kenobi gives up when a few stormtroopers arrive and point their weapons at him, and lets Vader slay him and vanishes.

Kenobi let Vader kill him so he could join Qui-Gon Gin. We don't get the full scope on this till Episode 2.



Originally posted by WWu777
- The stolen data tapes of the Death Star that the Imperials were after the whole movie made no sense. If the Rebels can analyze it and find a weakness in the Death Star so quickly and easily, why couldn't the Imperials have done the same long ago?

Labor unions. Any organization that large is bound to have huge gaping holes where people just don't care.


Originally posted by WWu777
There was no need to try to destroy the entire moon that the base was on, to destroy the Rebel base, and incur risk upon itself.

They were too sure of themselves. Plus the Death Star was a new toy and they wanted to use it to put fear of the empire into any remaining rebel scum that got away.



Originally posted by WWu777
- During the trench run, Vader locked onto Luke's fighter and fired his lasers. They should have hit Luke's X-Wing and destroyed it, just as it did to the other fighters. Yet Luke's fighter was not hit and it was never explained why.

That's why Vader said "The Force is strong with this one"



edit on 19-8-2011 by dbates because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-8-2011 by dbates because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 11:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by LanternOfDiogenes
- When the Falcon was captured by the Death Star tractor beam, and the Imperials found it empty because Han and his party were hiding in the smuggling compartments, why didn't the Imperials use their life form detection devices, like on Star Trek? They should have such capabilities, since at the beginning of the movie, when C3PO and R2D2 were in the escape pod fleeing the captured Rebel cruiser, the Star Destroyer personnel said, "There goes another one. Wait, hold your fire. There's no life forms. It must have short circuited." Then later an Imperial officer told Vader aboard the captured Rebel cruiser, "An escape pod was jettisoned during the fighting. But no life forms were aboard." This indicated that the Imperials did have life form detection capability. So why wasn't it used on the Falcon in the Death Star?
reply to post by WWu777
 


The only one im going to say anything about...they are assembling a probe on the Falcon to do just that when Han and Luke jumped them then called out for the storm troopers to come help them assemble said probe...the big red box ona mag lift the two nazi wannabees are taking aboard in the beginning of the scene...Nozzle...

edit on 12/08/11 by LanternOfDiogenes because: (no reason given)


They were assembling a scanner. However, at the beginning of the film, the Star Destroyer could detect life forms from far away, using a long range scanner. That's how they knew that the escape pod that C3PO and R2D2 used to escape from the Rebel blockade runner had no life forms on it. Remember? Why couldn't they instantly scan the Falcon like that? Why do you need to bring a scanner on board it? lol. It doesn't make sense.

Maybe the Falcon's smuggling compartments could block life form scanners. lol


edit on 19-8-2011 by WWu777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 11:08 PM
link   


- How could Luke endure the Emperor's lightning attack for so long, and then get up with normal strength afterward, yet Darth Vader only got hit with it for a few seconds while carrying the Emperor into the bottomless pit, and as a result, began dying right after?


Vader's body was composed mostly of electrical components which acted as a kind of life support for him.

"He's more machine now than man"-Kenobi

When he was struck by the lightning it short circuited his systems resulting in failure. Thanks for the interesting read. I've always been a Star Wars junkie.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 11:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by xxsomexpersonxx
Try doing one of these for the Matrix trilogy. That'll really give you a hard time.

Or The Butterfly Effect(Or most movies including time travel). It was like 2 years ago I saw that, and I still find myself contemplating flaws in it on practically a daily basis. No joke.


The Butterfly Effect was an annoying film that gave me a headache. The plot sounded interesting, but the movie wasn't. Debunking that film would be too easy and not worth the effort. lol

I have a logic flaw list of Dark Knight though, if you want to see it. lol

Btw, in my list of logic flaws above, see the ones about the shield generator on Endor. They are very thorough and irrefutable. They make Lucas look like the dumbest strategist in the world. lol

edit on 19-8-2011 by WWu777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 11:24 PM
link   
You summed it up in the first sentence, though. These movies are made for kids, and kids enjoy them. They actually make quite a bit more sense than most modern films made for children.



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 02:07 AM
link   
reply to post by WWu777
 


I'll skip over some since either you make a good point that I agree with or someone else already responded to.

New Hope
As far as why the stormtroopers on Tatooine killed Luke's aunt and uncle, that's explained here.

While a good show of force would have been to deploy a "F"-ton of fighters against the rebel assault, I don't believe there were that many rebel fighters attacking. Tarkin was quite sure that any damage they could inflict would be minimal at best and likely didn't want to waste the resources. Also it wouldn't really have been too effective without some fair micromanagement or you'd have TIE fighters bumping into each other often enough. Only after the attack was well underway did Vader take the initiative to grab some pilots and go ship to ship.

The Force is a powerful thing in Star Wars. In the back story, Kenobi was contacted by his old master and trained in the secrets of coming back from the dead... in a manner of speaking. He probably realized that he could be of more help to Luke in this spirit form than alive since Vader was right, Kenobi was becoming a weak old man. On the way to the tractor beam room, it is implied that he used the force to distract, memory wipe, mind influence, and meld into the shadows whenever possible. He became quite good at it during his self imposed exile at the end of the last prequel.

When Luke shot the torpedoes into the little hole, there's no telling how long it would take the reaction to occur and destroy the Death Star. The animation in the briefing room could have been sped up in the interest of time since the danger was near. For all we know it took a long while for the reaction to get to the main explodey area.

Empire

We only saw one scene where an Imperial Star Destroyer was disabled with the Ion cannon. It is implied that shots went out when each transport was launched. I believe it was also mentioned that they needed to reduce, or "flicker" the shield either as a whole or in certain quadrants that the transports needed to escape from. In all the movies we hear about deflector shield protecting certain parts of the ships, aft, fore and so on. There's no reason to think that the planetary shield couldn't be worked in the same fashion. This is why they needed close timing during the evacuation. The ion cannon itself was pretty massive. If you look at the scene where it fires, and then at when the bolt hits the ISD, you can gather a rough estimate on it's size. As to why it isn't able to be pointed at the slow walkers coming up, well the thing is pretty massive and designed to protect against orbital assaults. There are other ways to defend against the ground assault. It would also be prudent to keep fire on the orbital force to slow the deployment of ground forces.

Luke's X-Wing didn't have to fly directly between it's destinations, there would likely be a network of rebel friendly posts he could stop and refuel. When we saw the fighters being fueled before the Death Star assault over Yavin, we don't know if it was their equivalent of our JP-8, Tibanna gas for the blasters, LOX for the life support or any number of things. I would guess Tibanna gas personally. The X-wing is equipped with a hyperdrive that we don't exactly know how it works. For all we know it's like the warp drive in Star Trek that supplies power to the whole ship. During the entire trip, the hyperdrive would be the engine used most and not the four sublight engines.

Han and Co. going from Hoth to the asteroid belt is believable with the sublight propulsion. However I agree that it's unlikely they could've gotten to Bespin without hyperdrive of some sort.

The reason why Chewy never got shot is because of the stormtrooper helmets themselves. In New Hope, Luke mentions that he can't see a thing in the helmet. That and they could be old reservists that don't train that often. The well trained part of the army would be on better assignments.


Jedi

Jabba said himself that he enjoyed his favorite prize as he was, frozen in carbonite. It was also a show of power to others around him as to what could happen if they don't pay debts.

All I can say about taking everyone to the pit of Sarlacc was it had to be for entertainment value. Jabba could have had his dancer shot on the spot, but instead left her to the rancor for everyone's entertainment.

Boba Fett has a particular hatred towards Jedi as his father was killed by Mace Windu. He has a nice collection of lightsabers to boot. Even Mandalorian bounty hunters can loose their cool.

Leia has inherited her dad's medichlorian count, (seriously Lucas? bacteria?). She was described in the novel to have inadvertently summoned the force to give her the strength to yank Jabba's chain. The chain was attached to his dais and Leia's neck, he just had a hold of it since she was now his slave, not wrapped around him.

The new death star was in it's final stages of assembly. It was also supposed to be bigger than the original, designed to be more powerful, and to compensate for the flaws of the first one. The shield generator not being installed yet could be attributed to many different things... designs not working, late shipments, bad supply system, installation in progress, we simply don't know. Having a temporary, externally generated shield on hand would have been the safe bet. That would have been already built, tested and proven to work. There would have been plenty around the galaxy to import. The Death Star also had a sizable fleet backing it up this time. My main question would be, if it took decades or so to build the first one, why did this one take less time to get as operational as it was?

You're right about the rebel strategy on Endor, having a small squad try and assault the generator was stupid. They had intel about the fleet around the moon, the workings of the death star and the fact that the Emperor was there. Just knowing the fleet was there and the ability for them to deploy a huge landing force would have gotten this mission scrubbed in the first place. They had to know that the moon was also garrisoned with legions of troops...

Vader's plan for Luke wasn't to get him converted to the Emperor's side, it was to bring him to his own side and overthrow the Emperor. As we like to say on ATS, Never let a good crisis go to waste.

The Walker's being destroyed by the logs as they were could happen. The metal didn't have to be durasteel. Just like when we started in Iraq, why give the troops the best equipment? This should be a cake assignment. You can see that the interior was relatively spacious to have Chewy and a couple more ewoks in them. There is a scene where you can see the ewoks looking out of the viewports, that tells me that the armor couldn't have been that thick to begin with. Giant, thick logs have a lot of kinetic energy from the swing, so it is plausible that they could smash the thin walled walker that easily.

As to why the Imperials didn't immediately kill the "good guys," they are fairly afraid of Vader, and he did give orders to bring them back alive when Luke was captured.

Han was requesting reinforcements, not ordering them. The commander thought that the attack was being routed so he sent three squads to help. Where the rest of the Legion was, I'm not sure.

Not all Imperial members were d-bags. A lot of them wouldn't want to die in a fight where the enemy has you surrounded and controls the high ground. The sensible thing would be to surrender, and if you weren't a typical arrogant Imperial d-nozzle, and had a clean record, chances are you wouldn't be executed or imprisoned in the New Republic's judicial system.

With the power vacuum of the Emperor's death, the Empire fractured and split into factions. However the immediate emotion from the Imperial fleet would be shock. Having been shown that the rebels outmatched the Fleet with strategic thinking, they may have taken their assets and left the area.

--- The destruction of the Death Star over Endor was a huge ecological disaster as well. That many large parts, particles, and smaller debris raining into the atmosphere would likely destroy the ecology of the moon.

Good points, good points, good points...... AH!

Vader's body is regulated by a life support system due to his bad sun burn. Kenobi commented that he was more machine than man. It would make sense that all that electricity fried a circuit or two, even if he was grounded or shielded. Luke also had a bit of training to deflect some force attacks, he did some good at it but obviously couldn't block it all, though it still helped a bit.

Dragging Vader like he did, even in his depleted state, should have been more easy than for an average person because he can draw on the force to help. There isn't as much of a pronounced usage in the original trilogy than there was in the prequels, mostly due to budget and technology of the time. It would also make sense that the Emperor would have a private elevator to the hangar deck for evacuation. Even in his state, Vader could have been helping with a little control of the force too. The other Imperials had jobs to do. The station was under attack and blowing up around them. Damage control and evacuation would be in full force here.


Well those are the ones I chose to respond to. Like I said, any I didn't I either agreed with or someone else responded already. Hope some of this helps make sense for the movie.

As with most entertainment coming out of hollywood lately, Leave your brain at the door.



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 08:06 AM
link   

Originally posted by WWu777

I have a logic flaw list of Dark Knight though, if you want to see it. lol


If you already have it, go ahead and post it. The Dark Knight was awesome.



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 09:14 PM
link   
So what your saying is this movie just didn't ever need to be made because all the flaws point to pointless situations that could have been averted had they done something different.

We would have got a very much different film.



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 10:16 PM
link   
Biggest flaw in logic I can think of in the Star Wars movies was making Episode I into a 2 hour session of Congress.

Why the hell Lucas figured he'd take one of the most popular movie series of all time famed for its memorable characters and action and then make the first of his prequels the total opposite is beyond me.



posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 06:43 AM
link   
Here are some new logic flaws I just added.

Star Wars A New Hope

- Before the Falcon was captured by the Death Star, Governor Tarkin ordered his Imperial officers to execute Princess Leia immediately, after she lied to them about the location of the Rebel base. So how could Han, Luke, Ben and Chewie have so much time to sneak into the Death Star and rescue Princess Leia, if she was scheduled to be "executed immediately"? I guess "immediately" must be a long time in the Star Wars universe. lol

The Empire Strikes Back

- At the beginning of the film, Han Solo tells Leia and the General that he has to leave because he's still a wanted man being tracked by bounty hunters. But at the end of the first Star Wars film, Han had collected his reward for rescuing Princess Leia, and said that he was going to use it to pay off his debts to Jabba the Hutt. If he did that, then why is he still a wanted man at the beginning of Empire Strikes Back? That should have been explained, but it wasn't.

- When Luke escapes the Wampa cave on Hoth, he turns on his light saber and cuts off the Wampa creature's arm. Then he runs outside in the snow storm to slowly freeze to death until Han rescues him and digs a shelter. However, wouldn't it have been far safer for Luke to just finish off the Wampa creature with his lightsaber, so that he could use its cave as shelter, rather than go out and risk freezing to death? That Wampa was clearly no match for his light saber.

- During the Hoth battle scene, the Imperial Snow Walkers' armor hull was impenetrable to laser fire from the Rebel Snow Speeders. Luke says after firing at it, "That armor's too strong for blasters. Use harpoons and tow cables. That might be our only chance of stopping them." Yet when one of the Snow Walkers collapses after its legs were tied up by harpoon cables from a Snow Speeder, another Snow Speeder flew over it, shot the top part of it, and blew it up. Now, if you can blow up a Snow Walker just by shooting the top of it, then why didn't they do that earlier, instead of saying that their armor was too strong for their blasters and that they had to use harpoon cables? Huh?

- When Luke's Snow Speeder crashed, he got out and pulled himself up to the underbelly of a Snow Walker to throw a bomb/grenade into it. Then he detached the cable he was dangling from, and fell straight to the ground from a great height. How could he fall straight down from that high up, which we clearly saw, and not get injured or killed? Instead, he gets up and walks back to the Rebel Base to get into his X-Wing as though he were unharmed.

- When the Imperial fleet attacked the Rebel base on Hoth, most of the Rebels ended up escaping in transport ships, even though Hoth was surrounded by the Imperial fleet. These transport ships should have been destroyed or captured. Yet they all just slipped past the fleet, after one Rebel ion cannon disabled one Imperial Star Destroyer? WTF? Or could it be that that one ion cannon disabled the whole Imperial fleet? If it could do that, then why did they need to evacuate Hoth? They could have just kept firing with it to smash up the whole Imperial fleet.

Furthermore, the huge Imperial flagship Executor, which Vader was in, was also above Hoth. Since it looked to be the size of at least ten Star Destroyers, how would the ion cannon disable that? And how could all the Rebel transports get past that and all the Star Destroyers alongside it?

- If Anakin Skywalker created C3PO, as revealed in the first prequel, then why didn't Vader recognize his own creation when he saw him on Cloud City and in the carbon freezing chamber?

- If Vader could sense through the Force that Luke is his son, then why didn't he recognize Leia as his daughter in the first two movies when he encountered her?

Return of the Jedi

- When Luke returns to Dagobah to complete his Jedi training with Yoda, Yoda tells him that he does not need any more training, and that he must face Vader again to become a fully trained Jedi. How can this be? When he left Yoda and Ben's apparition in Empire Strikes Back, they said that he still needed a lot more training. How did Luke suddenly excel so far that he didn't need it anymore? One might think that his experience with Vader on Cloud City accelerated his training. However, that doesn't make sense. He got his ass whipped by Vader, his hand cut off, and suffered an emotional shock from learning that Vader was his father. How does that make up for missing training? Sure he resisted Vader's temptation to join him. But that shouldn't make up for any missed training either. Plus, in his previous training, Luke failed his test in the cave when he slew a phantom image of Darth Vader, which indicated that he still had a lot to learn. It just doesn't add up.

- In fact, what was the point of the stormtroopers wearing all that white armor over their whole body? I mean, it did not protect them against laser blasts, nor did it protect them against the Ewoks' arrows. So what was the point of wearing it? It only slowed them down, impeded their mobility and flexibility, and required cooling units inside. It seemed like a lot of trouble for nothing. The Empire does not seem very efficient. Why not just have the stormtroopers wear the gear and outfits that standard army soldiers wear, or that SWAT teams wear with bullet proof vests? That white armor that covered their whole body did not provide any advantages, only disadvantages.

Plus, didn't Luke say in the first Star Wars movie when he was wearing stormtrooper armor that, "I can't see a thing in this"? If the stormtroopers couldn't see well in that armor, then what's the point of wearing it? What kind of Empire puts helmets on their troops that interferes with their vision? lol. Wouldn't such an Empire that inefficient be unable to have conquered so many star systems? lol.

Also, I gotta wonder how those stormtroopers take a piss or # or even go to sleep. Do they remove all that armor every night? lol

- Swinging logs cannot destroy the metal hull of AT Walkers like paper. Metal does not collapse like paper from colliding with logs. On Hoth, when giant Snow Walkers were deployed, their armor was impenetrable to the lasers of the Rebel Snow Speeders, which means they must be pretty tough. So, if the little AT Walkers had similar armor, then there's no way swinging logs could crush them like paper.

- Speaking of Snow Walkers, one was seen in this film at night on Endor, in the scene where Luke surrenders himself to Vader. However, it was never used during the battle of Endor. I wonder why. Since its armor was impenetrable to lasers, there's no way the Ewoks could have done anything to it (except maybe tie a rope around its legs to topple it like the Snow Speeders did in Empire Strikes Back). It would also have kept the shield generator protected from Solo and his assault team. Now, one might suppose that it wasn't used because it was too big to walk around the forest fighting the Ewoks. But if that's so, then what was it doing there in the first place? At least it could have guarded the shield generator, so clowns like Solo couldn't get to it.

The bottom line is that technically, Return of the Jedi does not bring closure to the saga or end the war with the Empire. Even if the Empire had divided up into factions after the Emperor died, still, with Imperial ships out there that outmatched the Rebel ships, the galaxy was still not safe and neither was the Rebel Alliance. The rest of the Empire still posed a great danger. So the silly war on Endor had not really brought stable peace to the galaxy. Therefore, Lucas goofed in assuming that it did.

- On Endor, when Luke asks Leia, "What do you remember about your mother? Your real mother?" Leia replies that her mother died when she was very young, and that all she remembered was that she was beautiful but sad. Yet in the prequels, Padme dies while giving childbirth to Luke and Leia, so how could Leia remember anything about her? That has been cited as a major plothole. But then again, what's new? Lucas is no master of logic. That's for sure. Rather, he seems to be a master of cheesiness. lol



edit on 21-8-2011 by WWu777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 10:45 AM
link   

Originally posted by xxsomexpersonxx

Originally posted by WWu777

I have a logic flaw list of Dark Knight though, if you want to see it. lol


If you already have it, go ahead and post it. The Dark Knight was awesome.


I agree that Dark Knight was awesome, in a lot of ways, but sound logic and being realistic wasn't one of them. lol

Anyway, here is my list of logic flaws about it.

Implausibilities and logic flaws in Dark Knight

The Batman film Dark Knight is an artfully made masterpiece about psychological chaos. However, there are numerous implausibilities and logic flaws in it. I just saw it again, so here are the ones I noticed.

- At the beginning, during the bank heist scene organized by the Joker, the masked robbers were all ordered to shoot each other so that each of them could keep a bigger share of the fortune. Then the Joker himself joins them, unknown to his own henchmen. Why would he do that, when there was a high probability that one of them would shoot him, since they were told to shoot each other? Yet in spite of this high risk, the Joker walks through it as though he were invincible and super confident that he wouldn't get hurt.

- The abilities and powers of the Joker are completely implausible. He has no super powers and is not bullet proof. Yet he can blow up hospitals, ferries, rip off mob bosses, kill random people, terrorize all of Gotham City, etc. yet not one person can point a gun at him and shoot him. lol. That's crazy. Technically, any average Joe can point a gun at the Joker and shoot him, since he is only human. Yet no one ever does. Instead, everyone fears him as if he were some immortal invincible villain immune to danger. This is totally implausible and makes no sense. Normally, if you rip off the mob, they will kill you and get away with it, since everyone fears them and all the right people are paid off by them. This was established in the first film, Batman Begins, when the mob boss explains the depth of power he wields over the whole city to Bruce Wayne, and why that made him untouchable. But the Joker is able to rip off mob bosses routinely, and get away with it cause no one has the gal to just shoot him. Not the police, not the mob, nor anybody, including Batman, is able to just shoot and kill the Joker. No reason is given for this, other than that he is the Joker and everyone is afraid of him. lol. Go figure. Yet the invincible Joker treats the whole city and everyone in it like they are his toys. He can walk by all his enemies out in the open while remaining unharmed. Yeah right.

- The scene where Batman goes to Hong Kong and kidnaps the Chinese bank thief was very unrealistic. When Batman grabbed him and was surrounded by the Hong Kong police and SWAT team, his shoulder and head were exposed enough for them to take a shot at. They could have easily shot Batman's shoulder or head and freed the Chinese guy, as they do in other movies. But they did nothing and waited. Then Batman takes his captive and swings out the window using a rope or wire attached to a cargo plane overhead, flown by his teammates, and escapes Hong Kong with his prisoner. Yeah right. One cannot dangle from rope or wire from a plane and be simply pulled in. I have never heard of anyone doing that before. And there's probably a reason for that. It is probably too dangerous as the plane would be flying too fast for anyone dangling from it to be safe and survive. All in all, that was a very unrealistic breakout scene in Hong Kong.

- The woman who played Rachel was only average looking. (Katie Holmes, who played Rachel in Batman Begins, was replaced by her for some reason) Yet the handsome billionaire Bruce Wayne expresses an interest in a serious relationship with her, which she rejects?! Yeah right. Bruce Wayne was used to dating super models and Russian ballet dancers, as shown in this film. Yet he's interested in having a serious relationship with this average looking Rachel? Yeah right. No way. She was way under his league and social status. If Rachel had still been played by Katie Holmes, this might have been more plausible. But not with that woman playing her.

Also, why would Rachel reject a handsome billionaire who happens to be her best friend whom she grew up with, and whom she also knew was a brave daring super hero? Right. Does she think she could ever do better than that?

- When the Joker grabbed Rachel at the party, in front of Batman, and dropped her off the skyscraper, Batman immediately dove after her. In midair, he grabs her and falls with her all the way down the height of the skyscraper, hitting some canvas below. Yet how did they survive such a long fall? It was never explained. Batman never opened any parachute, nor his wings. So how was he able to slow down the fall enough not to kill Rachel or himself? I don't see how. Did I miss something? This scene wasn't clear at all.

- Police Chief Gordon was shot down by the Joker's henchmen, who were attempting to assassinate the Mayor, when he dove to save his life. But later in the movie, Gordon suddenly reappears and comes back to life. Yet there is no explanation for how he survived that fatal gunshot. When he appears again, he does not even look injured.

- In the police interrogation room, Batman punches the Joker many times, and bashes his head against the wall many times as well, while he's trying to get him to reveal where Harvey Dent was. Yet the Joker never bleeds or gets injured from all that bashing? WTF? He should have been bleeding badly after all that. Why doesn't the director want to show the Joker bleeding? Because he's invincible and larger than life? lol

- During the chase scene on the road, the big rig truck that the Joker is driving gets trapped by some wires or ropes that Batman set up, causing the whole truck to flip forward and land upside down. There is no way that such a big heavy truck could be flipped forward like that by wires or ropes. That is physically impossible, no matter how fast the truck was going at.

- A top criminal like the Joker should have been placed in maximum security prison, not in a simple cell with a bunch of other thugs, with only a few policemen around. Come on now. After finally catching such a powerful master criminal capable of causing mass destruction, why would they put him in a simple cell with minimal security? And why did the police let one of their men stay in the interrogation room with the Joker, which they should have known the Joker could easily incapacitate and use as a hostage, given his proven incredible abilities? His escape was way too easy. He just blew up one of the other inmates using a phone, whom his henchmen probably placed bombs inside, and then he was free? Huh? If the blast didn't kill the Joker, then why would it have taken out all the other policemen there to let him get away? That was too easy and contrived.

- When Batman pushes the mob guy he grabbed from the disco off the balcony, and then questions him, he tells Batman that no one will ever betray the Joker. But why? The Joker is not honorable or noble. He randomly kills his own men, as he did in the beginning of the film during the bank heist scene, so why would anyone be steadfastly loyal to him, to the point of never betraying him? There is no reason why anyone would be that loyal to such a psychopathic character. The mob guy never gave a valid explanation for that claim.

- There was no plausible reason for Harvey Dent to have fallen from being a White Knight of Gotham and turning into a ruthless killer who revels in chaos. Just because the Joker tells him that everything is determined by chance and chaos, and that making plans was vain, is not enough to turn a good man into an evil man. That simply is not sufficient or plausible.

- When the Joker visits Harvey Dent in the hospital and gives him a gun to shoot him with, Harvey should have immediately shot him. We are not told whether the gun was loaded or not, but if it was, why would the Joker do that, knowing that there was an almost 100 percent chance that Harvey would shoot him? Why does the Joker take the most dangerous reckless risks with 100 percent confidence? For some reason, Harvey flipped a coin and spared the Joker's life. There was no reason for that. The Joker and his henchmen were the cause of Rachel's death and abduction, as well as his. There was no way Harvey would have spared the Joker just cause of his cheap talk. He knew the Joker was a psychopathic liar, so why would he listen to anything he says?

Furthermore, Harvey should have known from Batman that the Joker was the one who knew the location where Harvey and Rachel were being held, so obviously, he and his henchmen must have had something to do with it.

- At the end, Batman tells Gordon to blame the murders that Harvey Dent committed on him, so that the people of Gotham would not lose faith in what Harvey stood for, which may cause the criminals he put away to be released. However, there was no need for Batman to be the fall guy for those murders, which would only make his life more difficult. Gordon could have just blamed those murders on the Joker, his henchmen, or any other criminal in the crime infested city of Gotham. There was no reason why only Batman could be the fall guy to save Harvey Dent's reputation.

Furthermore, why subject Batman to a chase, especially when he just got shot and took a high fall from that building, which probably injured him and put him in no condition to run from a chase by the police?



new topics

top topics



 
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join