An in-depth (re)view of the Cash/ Landrum case

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posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 10:03 AM
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I've always been fascinated with this case. However some of you are jumping to some pretty astounding conclusions. It has been over 30 years since this event happened. Do we presently have technology that levitates water tower sized objects? I have yet to see anyone explain how a device emitting nuclear aerosol wouldn't harm the operator inside of the craft. Betty wasn't that close to the craft, yet suffered significant radiation poisoning. Wouldn't this intense of exposure be even more inside of the craft? What material is capable of shielding from radiation? Lead. Are we dealing with a lead constructed craft the size of a water tower? What Earthly tech could explain this?

Many of you find comfort in explaining this as secret military testing, but this is one of those rare cases where prosaic explanations sound sillier than the ETH, IMO. Even if this was a secret military testing program which they continue to lie about, are we supposed to overlook their obvious deceit when they obfuscate other stories about ET & UFO's? How do we know when they are lying and when they aren't? If you chose to buy the story that the govt is lying about a secret testing program that nearly destroyed three innocent lives, you better not believe a single word any US official has to say about ANY other sighting.




posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 06:24 PM
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Originally posted by TheReligiousHoax
...
Do we presently have technology that levitates water tower sized objects? I have yet to see anyone explain how a device emitting nuclear aerosol wouldn't harm the operator inside of the craft. Betty wasn't that close to the craft, yet suffered significant radiation poisoning. Wouldn't this intense of exposure be even more inside of the craft? What material is capable of shielding from radiation? Lead. Are we dealing with a lead constructed craft the size of a water tower? What Earthly tech could explain this?


Thanks for your input! Exactly the same questions I would love to see answered. sir



posted on Jan, 25 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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Here's an interesting point about the Cash-Landrum case that's often overlooked because the term "UFO" carries so much baggage:

"The Cash-Landrum case... Unfortunately for UFO advocates, the ‘UFO’ never demonstrated extraordinary performance capabilities, like suddenly zooming away.”
MUFON Journal Nov. 1998: Perspectives by Richard Hall

Even if the UFO was of terrestrial military origin, it's still a Unidentified Flying Object to us, and the case is worthy of further study. No matter the final answer, there is much to be learned here about the way the event was handled by the Military, the Government, UFOlogists and the Media.
edit on 25-1-2012 by CardDown because: formatting



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 04:57 AM
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reply to post by CardDown
 


Yes, the quote just underlines the probably most feasible theory of all, the craft being of military origin.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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Here's another odd bit regarding the investigation:


“When Betty and Vickie contacted their congressmen, their frustration was heightened. all they received in return was a from letter telling them about the now defunct Air Force [Project Blue Book] ... and a suggestion they contact a cult group in California.”

John Schuessler, from the 1981 CUFOS Conference,
The Spectrum of UFO Research, 1988

The Blue Book info, although lame, is understandable, but a cult group?
But, maybe that characterization is just hyperbole. Any ideas who this might have been? It sounds like it refers to Borderland Sciences Research.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 11:46 PM
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Originally posted by CardDown
Here's another odd bit regarding the investigation:


“When Betty and Vickie contacted their congressmen, their frustration was heightened. all they received in return was a from letter telling them about the now defunct Air Force [Project Blue Book] ... and a suggestion they contact a cult group in California.”

John Schuessler, from the 1981 CUFOS Conference,
The Spectrum of UFO Research, 1988

The Blue Book info, although lame, is understandable, but a cult group?
But, maybe that characterization is just hyperbole. Any ideas who this might have been? It sounds like it refers to Borderland Sciences Research.


I always wonder how you can come up with some nice pieces of information, so thanks a lot for that!


Yes, a cult group? That really sounds strange... Maybe just a misleading (dis)info... Why does a cult group (okay, we don't know which cult they are about though..) has any ties with a supposed military project....

I will have a research on BSR!



posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 04:08 AM
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Maybe it was the government's way of saying "get lost, weirdos".



posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 04:36 AM
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Originally posted by Mogget
Maybe it was the government's way of saying "get lost, weirdos".


But on the other hand, why should the government care about some unexpected civilians (and furthermore calling them weirdos when the craft "unintentionally" hurt them?)?
edit on 27/1/12 by Dalbeck because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by Mogget
 


Well, yes. The Air Force had wanted to get rid of the UFO problem for a long time. Once they were free of it, they responded to UFO inquiries with a form letter, an example of which can be seen here:
USAF UFO Fact Sheet (circa 1980)


There are a number of universities and professional scientific organizations such as the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which have considered UFO phenomena during periodic meetings and seminars. In addition, a list of private organizations interested in aerial phenomena may be found in Gale's Encyclopedia of Associations (Edition 8, Vol I, pp. 432-3). Such timely review of the situation by provate groups insures that sound evidence will not be overlooked by the scientific community.

This may not be the particular version sent to Mrs. Cash and Landrum. They may have been sent an additional page with contact information for a research group, which Mr. Schuessler characterized as a cult. If so, they probably received a copy of a page of Gale's Encyclopedia of Associations (with information similar to this early 1990s entry):

*6574* BORDERLAND SCIENCES RESEARCH FOUNDATION
(Phenomena) (BSRF)
P.O. Box 429 Phone: (707) 986-7211
Garberville, CA 95440 Thomas Joseph Brown, Dir.
Founded: 1945. Members: 750. Staff: 2. Individuals who take an active interest
in the "borderland between the visible and invisible manifestations of
reality," including the fields of parapsychology, the occult, psychic research,
hypnosis, dowsing, radiesthesia, radionics, flying saucers, telepathy, and other
phenomena. Explores phenomena which orthodox science cannot or will not
investigate. Offers recognition, understanding, and encouragement to individuals
who are having unusual experiences of the borderland type or are
conducting research in the occult. Maintains 1000 volume library on occult
science and related fields. Convention/ Meeting: none.
. Publications: Journal of Borderland Research, bimonthly. Journal containing
feting of researchers and research sources. Price: Included in membership
dues. ISSN: 0897-0394. Circulation: 750. Advertising: not accepted.
• Also publishes catalog.

In the face of their suffering, I'm sure they found such a response to be cold and insulting.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 10:16 AM
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There have been a several new entries on the site following the Cash-Landrum case, including a look into the notebook of Col. George Sarran, the evolving shape of the UFO, the first news coverage of the event, and a transcription of the first written testimony in the case.
Blue Blurry Lines: The Texas Piney Woods UFO Case



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 06:46 PM
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A documentary filmmaker is collecting donations to film "The Huffman UFO Encounter".
He claims to have the cooperation and approval of John Schuessler, as well as the agreement of Colby Landrum to participate in the film.
www.kickstarter.com...



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 07:27 PM
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Reminds me of Project Orion that started in 1957 and ended in the mid to late 60's. It was claimed that the Airforce actually tested small models of this concept. The shape is sort of close to the OP's write up. The video is only a couple of minutes long.

Source: videos.howstuffworks.com...



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 06:20 AM
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Thanks dcmb!

I actually believe more and more that this vehicle indeed was a secret concept and continuation of the NASA project.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 06:35 AM
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I believe Shuessler spoiled the investigation and missed the chance of investigating the heli pilot. They went so far and then quit. It's obvious to anyone that many many chinooks can only come from one place and that place is the military!

Dalbeck your thread was very enjoyable to read when I was lurking a long time.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 06:58 AM
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reply to post by BengalFighter
 


Thanks for your kind words BengalFighter! I'm also wondering, why Schuessler didn't investigate the trace concerning the Chinook pilot(s). I actually contacted Dan Marro (investigator and documentary filmmaker who wants to poduce a DVD about this UFO case) to see where it leads. Maybe he will join ATS/ this thread



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 10:59 AM
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I have heard the following information:

1.) This was a hydrazine powered troop carrier prototype. Due to the nature of the propulsion system the craft was flown via CCTV as there were no windows. When the CCTV subsequently failed, the helicopter fleet was called in for assistance.

2.) The main diamond part of the craft was actually a hot air balloon design. The propulsion system produced heat to keep the balloon aloft.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by finter
 

Interesting, can you at least hint as to your source?

The balloon would explain one puzzling element, the massive size of the UFO. Also, the craft was described as floating or hovering slowly, so the flight of a balloon would be consistent with the witness reports.

Even if you plug in a balloon as apossible answer for the UFO. that leaves a whole slug of unanaswered questions, starting with why were there no other good reports of seeing it, and how did a fleet of helicopters suddenly appear and vanish...



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 03:17 AM
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Thanks finter for the pieces of information you provided. I can only repeat CardDown's request for at least giving a hint as to your source for futher investigation.



Originally posted by CardDown
reply to post by finter
 

Interesting, can you at least hint as to your source?

The balloon would explain one puzzling element, the massive size of the UFO. Also, the craft was described as floating or hovering slowly, so the flight of a balloon would be consistent with the witness reports.


You're right CardDown, the hot air ballon theory would be consistent with the reported traits of the craft.

And I personally was always leaning towards the chemical propulsion theory. I will be researching the effects of Hydrazine (which is also used as a propulsion engine in satellites) for the human body and if it's consistent with the effects Betty and Vicky experienced.


Originally posted by CardDown
reply to post by finter
 

Even if you plug in a balloon as apossible answer for the UFO. that leaves a whole slug of unanaswered questions, starting with why were there no other good reports of seeing it, and how did a fleet of helicopters suddenly appear and vanish...


Just look through my initial post in this thread, there were actually some witnesses for the craft and one person even described some (biological/ physical) effects the craft had on him while flying/ floating over his property!
edit on 8/11/12 by Dalbeck because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 03:31 AM
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After a quick research in a medical data base I came to the conclusion that we might be on to something!


Hydrazine has actually exactly the same effects on a biological entity as the craft's propulsion system had on the witnesses.

I just threw the German text into the google translator for you English speaking guys



The substance can be administered orally, absorbed through inhalation or through the skin. It etches the skin, the eyes and the respiratory tract. At a temperature of already 20 ° C, it leads very fast to a toxic contamination of the air. A contact with the eyes and / or skin can be recognized by a redness, burns and pain. After oral intake, the patient shows vomiting, abdominal cramps, spasms, weakness, confusion, and loss of consciousness to unconsciousness. After an inhalation absorption are nausea, headache, sore throat, a burning sensation, a cough and dyspnea. The symptoms may be delayed. As a result, a worst inhalation toxic pulmonary edema occur. This is with cortisone, in any case, preclinical, medicate. Even after short exposure can the liver, kidneys and the central nervous system could be affected. Exposure above the exposure limit may end fatally. The substance is suspected to cause cancer in humans. To exceed the occupational exposure limit is not detectable by smell.
Also an article suggests Hydrazine is used in most cases by the military (jets, satellites, you name it...).



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by Dalbeck
 


New Blog post with links to 3 radio programs discussing the case:
blueblurrylines.blogspot.com...

Note: in one of them John Schuessler strongly argues against the military craft theory, saying there is no evidence for it. (Sadly, there is not much positive evidence of any kind.





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