It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Britain's first pre-Roman planned town found

page: 2
26
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 04:25 AM
link   
reply to post by thoughtsfull
 


thanks for that info, I'll take a good look at it all tonight




posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 04:40 AM
link   

Originally posted by Versa
reply to post by zerozero00
 


Hiya, funnily enough I did a thread on Chysauster a while ago link to thread, my fave iron age village too


So you did!


I love the rich pre-roman history we have....You just have to understand it was not an empire like the Romans and it was mainly farmers and craftsmen that respected their surroundings living here!

I believe that way before the roman invaison the Briton was worshipping the seasons, the sun, the moon and the Earths Elements!....They understood about nature more than we do today!.....They understood about Vortex Energy and lay lines!....Which they used to built huge stone monuments in these places!

The Romans where no different from what modern America is today IMO



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 04:56 AM
link   
reply to post by Versa
 


Sorry to sound a patronising dick with that statement!...I didn't mean to sound like I did!


Anyway!
Good thread and I see you know your stuff!

I think there is so much to consider when talking about pre-roman briton, the fact the only written work to be found is Roman is an indicator we aren't being told all the story!

The Romans rather destroyed the evidence or it sits in the vault at the Vatican!

I'm going with the Vatican as it has a lot to answer to!...What info is in the Vault at the Vatican??....Another day another thread I suppose!!



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 05:17 AM
link   
reply to post by zerozero00
 




I think there is so much to consider when talking about pre-roman briton, the fact the only written work to be found is Roman is an indicator we aren't being told all the story!

The Romans rather destroyed the evidence or it sits in the vault at the Vatican!


I lean this way especially when you dig down a little and see the clash between Britain and Rome on the topic of religion (been on going a while now)

It is amazing how few people know the founding rules of the Christian Church came about as a direct result of that clash of principles between Britain and Rome.

I honestly find the clash between the 2 cultures (These Isles and Rome) really interesting.. I am guessing that the version of Christianity taught on these isles adopts a lot from previous British cultures and as such gives us an insight into those ancient times.

Sorry Op for the off topic post..



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 05:31 AM
link   
reply to post by Versa
 


After reading Uriel's Machine:The Ancient Origins of Science, i have become even more intrigued about neolithic sites of interest, especially Henge's, within the book it mentions somewhere that some archaeologists opened up a "burial mound" I use burial mound loosely, and within written on the walls in Viking, was a sentence stating that they had opened it and it was empty.

My belief about "burial mounds" is that they were maybe used as a solar calenders etc.

(thanks for the links to your other threads, I am going to have a lot of reading to do tonight)

Jah bless



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 11:59 AM
link   
reply to post by Dubninja
 

I am just about to read that book again, as it happens. I've often wondered what other settlement remains are lying just off our coasts, in what is now the seabed of the North Sea and English Channel.

I am certain that our civilisation here in Britain goes back long before Saxons, Romans, Celts or any people you could actually name. I live in SW England and often love visiting various places in Somerset and Wiltshire. It's like a museum on a grand scale.

edit on 19/8/11 by NocturnalPhantom because: add a few words



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 12:47 PM
link   
Very interesting,thanks OP.

I wonder if Britain was infested with multiculturalism back then,as it is today?



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 01:14 PM
link   
reply to post by BillyBoBBizWorth
 


Don't know, but they may have had quite a lot of knuckle dragging Neanderthals about the place, just like we do today.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 01:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by thoughtsfull

I lean this way especially when you dig down a little and see the clash between Britain and Rome on the topic of religion (been on going a while now)

It is amazing how few people know the founding rules of the Christian Church came about as a direct result of that clash of principles between Britain and Rome.

I honestly find the clash between the 2 cultures (These Isles and Rome) really interesting.. I am guessing that the version of Christianity taught on these isles adopts a lot from previous British cultures and as such gives us an insight into those ancient times.

Sorry Op for the off topic post..


I think its totally on topic to be honest and I agree there is a lot to learn and a lot we have yet to discover about the true nature of the Ancient Britons. I think their culture was more advanced than a lot of us realise.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 01:27 PM
link   
reply to post by Versa
 


I think for a large part of the past 2000 years the real religion of the common British people was really Christopaganism, even if they wouldn't have thought to call it that.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 01:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by NocturnalPhantom
reply to post by Versa
 


I think for a large part of the past 2000 years the real religion of the common British people was really Christopaganism, even if they wouldn't have thought to call it that.


Well I think that Christianity as a whole is more than half pagan, its saints days, festivals, buildings are all based on the original Pagan religion.... I read a book a while ago about Cornish Saints, if you ever go to Cornwall you'll see a huge amount of St's (St Just, St Ives, St Day, St Agnes, St Kevern etc) and this seems to be because Cornwall was such a staunchly Celtic/Pagan place, the Church leaders had to canonise virtually everyone in Cornwall to get them interested in the new religion.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 02:51 PM
link   


Don't know, but they may have had quite a lot of knuckle dragging Neanderthals about the place, just like we do today.


Haha!

Too true NocturnalPhantom,

Great post by the way,made me chuckle.

Cheers



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 04:24 PM
link   
reply to post by Versa
 


If you look across the southwest you often find pagan rites or locations absorbed into the church. You'd be surprised how much the name St. Michael appears right across the Westcountry in association with hilltops and towers. It's as if the name St. Michael was deliberately chosen to replace the name of some pagan sky god. Likewise, you get a lot of springs and wells named after female saints. It all gets rather fascinating once you really start getting into it. I'm still constantly learning more and more of this old stuff just in the southern half of Bristol where I live.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 05:08 PM
link   
reply to post by NocturnalPhantom
 

hiya


yes I agree, I posted earlier in this thread about the absorption of pagan beliefs, gods, and places


I also live just south of Bristol (deepest darkest Zomerzet)



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 06:04 PM
link   
reply to post by Versa
 


I live in Brislington, but I spend a lot of my spare days wandering around the Dundry Hill/ Chew Valley/Stanton Drew/Pensford area. Do you know it?
There's a whole load of fascinating things buried under there I'm sure!
I'm going to actually read the whole thread now. I usually do before posting but today has been a very busy one.
edit on 19/8/11 by NocturnalPhantom because: add a few words



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 06:11 PM
link   
I think the triangle between Minehead, Watchet and Dulverton is nice as well. When you get chatting to the locals, there's a whole load of really interesting folklore and paranormal legends down that way that ties in quite well with a lot of Celto-Saxon legends.



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 03:12 AM
link   
reply to post by NocturnalPhantom
 



Im going to take a trip to our local Museum this week and see what I can dig up about the area



posted on Aug, 20 2011 @ 03:59 AM
link   
reply to post by Versa
 


And if you ever get the chance, nip over to the County Museum in Taunton. It's actually quite amazing. Stuff from all eras, from right across Somerset.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 12:39 PM
link   
reply to post by Versa
 


I just learned of this late yesterday, outside reading Bill Bryson's At Home.

My mouth dropped open....I've studied the ancient archaeology and mythology stuff all my life, and had never heard of it...so just before signing off today I thought I'd see if ATS already had it posted.

Thanks for doing this thread (saves me time to go outside and read some more).

S/F (belated).....


wildtimes



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 12:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by Versa
. Im never quite sure how you pronounce the name either, when I was younger it was pronounced Bow-da-see-ah but i think its more common to pronounce it Boo-dick-ah


You can pronouce the name either way.

She appears to have originally been called "Boudicca", but then "Boadicea" became more used.

From the 19th century, "Boadicea" became the most common version of the name. It appears that the Roman historian Tacitus (who was about 4-years-old during the Bouddican Revolt of 60AD) called her Boudicca, and Boadicea probably derived from a mistranscription when a manuscript of his was copied in the Middle Ages.

In the Proto-Celtic language (the ancestor of all Celtic languages) the feminine adjective *boudīka meant "victorious."

So the name "Boudicca" is actually the Ancient British equivalent of the modern name "Victoria." So she was Queen Victoria to her people, the Iceni!



edit on 28-3-2012 by Sicksicksick because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-3-2012 by Sicksicksick because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-3-2012 by Sicksicksick because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-3-2012 by Sicksicksick because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
26
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join