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What forced all isotopes initially where they concist of two neutrons?

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posted on Aug, 14 2011 @ 12:36 AM
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I may be wrong about the names of these because just now I finally read wikipedia on nuclear reactions.
edit on 14-8-2011 by MichelJCardin because: None
And this may have been perhaps another thread but what would then occure when two were to be fused at the ame time in a space not quite large enough to accomadate both expanded and could these be huvered?
edit on 14-8-2011 by MichelJCardin because: Curious.
I mean to ask that if you split a nucleus; it then takes more space right? And what if there are two in a space and both get split with just short of enough space to acomidate them both all expanded.
edit on 14-8-2011 by MichelJCardin because: To explain a different way I guess.
Oh; and then I was wondering if then as they suspend; if these could be flickered back and forth like quartz by using a charge.
edit on 14-8-2011 by MichelJCardin because: (no reason given)
Sorry about the spelling as I write french and english and sometimes gets confusing.
edit on 14-8-2011 by MichelJCardin because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 14 2011 @ 01:32 AM
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Did you say: "huvered"?


second line....



posted on Aug, 14 2011 @ 01:38 AM
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I have some passing experience with nuclear science but I'm not sure I understand what you are asking.

Please try and phrase your question differently and I'll give answering it, a go.



posted on Aug, 14 2011 @ 02:32 AM
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reply to post by MichelJCardin
 


OK, I think I see what you are asking.

You are seeing the fission of the nucleus of an atom as being the same as splitting the neutron.

Part of the answer is that the neutron is particle with no specific charge that is most often found in the nucleus of an atom.

When you split an atom, neutrons are released from the nucleus but they themselves are not split in the process.

The protons and neutrons are broken apart and the binding energy that held them together is released (the atomic energy) but the particles are essentially intact.

It is these freed particles that can break apart the next atom that is in the right state that forms the concept of a chain-reaction.

Each time a nucleus is broken, the binding energy is released and the freed neutron can impact the nucleus of another atom, breaking that one too & releasing more energy.

It is because the Neutron has no charge that it can penetrate to the nucleus of the next atom, there is no charge to drive it away.

Does that answer your question?
edit on 14/8/2011 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2011 @ 02:55 AM
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reply to post by MichelJCardin
 


Explanation: S&F!

Neutrons are NOT stable outside the nucleus of an atom and have a decay rate of about



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