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Latest SOHO LASCO Image and movie Show a massive object

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posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by Vandalour
 


oh lookie there...




posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by Nobama
 


It wouldn't be the first time I've been wrong the past couple days.
I'd put my money on Venus.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


lol I was directing that at the other guy, when you posted Mercury you actually had me second guessing



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 08:07 PM
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If you have been watching that object with the Lasco C3 images......there's been a loooong black ribbon coming back from that object for weeks.

Go back a week and it's easier to see the black ribbon coming back:

sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov...





Venus is BEHIND the sun, SOHO can't see it:

www.fourmilab.ch/cgi-bin/Solar/action?sys=-Si



Mercury??
edit on 13-8-2011 by Pervius because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by Pervius
 


Oh your right so if it isnt Venus....than there's a large body not only close to our Sun, but almost on the same path as Venus, Should we head to the hills now, even though we cannot see said object?



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by Nobama
 


I'm confuuuused


Here's the current view of the Sun, Mercury, and Venus from Earth (which is also the view from SOHO):

SOHO View

So, it all depends on SOHO's orientation. And I haven't been following SOHO's imagery regularly enough to know that.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 08:17 PM
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Well, if anything, I learned about a lot of cool sites where I can track this stuff now. It's definitely not Mercury as it will transit from left to right.




It looks like it's Venus.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by Enlightenme1111
 


As I said in the post above yours, it all depends on SOHO's current orientation. If it's upside-down relative to us, then it's Mercury.

Has anyone been paying attention to SOHO's orientation?



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 08:55 PM
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reply to post by Enlightenme1111
[mor
Wouldnt Venus be very small. If its behind the Sun. This object looks big.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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Originally posted by aarys
reply to post by Enlightenme1111
[mor
Wouldnt Venus be very small. If its behind the Sun. This object looks big.


Here is a previous shot of Venus in 2000.
They look relatively similar in size.

EDIT: However, you're correct, Venus wasn't directly behind the sun at that point, but still on the far end of it's orbit


edit on 13-8-2011 by Enlightenme1111 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 09:12 PM
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reply to post by Enlightenme1111
 


However, those images aren't to scale. The SOHO C3 (blue) image covers a 16-degree field of view. The SOHO C2 (red) image covers a 3-degree FOV. So, with the images being the same size, the object in the OP image is actually about a fifth the size of Venus in the image you posted.
It's probably actually closer in size to Mercury in the blue image, once the differing FOV is taken into account.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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will this help?

edit on 13-8-2011 by BobAthome because: (no reason given)


edit on 13-8-2011 by BobAthome because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by Enlightenme1111
 


Swamp Gas or some other BS they will tell us.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


Yeah, you're making some good points. It does look pretty big for it to be at the far end of it's orbit. I don't know honestly, I'm just an armchair astronomer.
edit on 13-8-2011 by Enlightenme1111 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 09:32 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by Enlightenme1111
 


Considering the field of view, I'd say it's Venus. Mercury should be outside C2's FOV. C3 should be capturing it, though, in the lower left.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 09:53 PM
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reply to post by Enlightenme1111
 

The size of planets in the SOHO images doesn't have much to do with the physical size but with the brightness of the object. The coronographs are very sensitive, the sensors get saturated by bright sources of light causing a "blooming" effect. Bright objects appear large because a lot of pixels are affected. In reality Venus would be smaller than a single pixel.

Being opposite the Sun, Venus is at Superior Conjunction. It's a "full" Venus, an entire hemisphere of clouds reflecting light toward the spacecraft.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 09:56 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thank you for the knowledge Phage. Much appreciated.




posted on Aug, 14 2011 @ 10:35 AM
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reply to post by Vandalour
 



How lame people just say ... its venus.. or its a banana... well, give us a link or pictures, anything, that can back up all these claims.. just saying And btw. be nice to op, no need to go with that negative tone.


Here is your evidence... its pretty easy to prove to yourself.


SOHO Orbit


SOHO is in orbit between the Earth and the Sun. It is about 150,703,456 kilometers (92 million miles) from the Sun and only about 1,528,483 Kilometers (1 million miles) from the Earth (three times farther than the moon). This orbit is around a mathematical point between the Earth and the Sun known as the Lagrange point or the L1 point. The L1 point is a point of equilibrium between the Earth's and Sun's gravitational field, that is to say that the pull is equal from both the Sun and the Earth. The L1 point is a point of unstable equilibrium (like a bowl round side up with a marble balanced on it). As a result, we have to compensate for perturbations due to the pull of the planets and the Earth's moon. Every few months we use a little fuel to fine tune our orbit and keep it from getting too far off track. This is known as "station keeping manoeuvres"


Therefore, you can tell from the above picture, in conjunction with the fact that the SOHO satellite is always located between Earth and Sun, that this is Venus. SOHO's perspective of the sun is almost exactly that of Earth's (just magnified). On Aug 13, Venus is just to the right of the Sun and is about to pass behind the sun. This is exactly what the SOHO player indicates.



posted on Aug, 14 2011 @ 10:57 AM
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Urantia ? No.

Nibiru ? no no .

It's freakin Soho dude.



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