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How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Times And Live?

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posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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From Blind Alfred Reed all the way back in 1929. Time may pass, but the war on the poor was being waged by the elite back then as it is now. Here's to a time when life and music were simpler...







Any other old (pre-1940) blues/folk music lovers out there?




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 06:15 PM
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Yeah I know, pretty weak thread. But it's my first try so I figured it's better to get something small right than it is to screw up something big.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by HenryTwoTimes
 


how you ask? rock and roll \m/



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 02:21 AM
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Let's see if this link will work... i'm so tired (it might take a second to load)
new.music.yahoo.com...
edit on 16-8-2011 by trika3000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 02:08 PM
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My last comment and post, "I'm so Tired" is actually a new song, but fits in with the early style of blues.

This song, "When the Levee Breaks", by Memphis Minnie and Joe Mccoys (which was redone in the '70s by Led Zepplin), is from 1929.

More in line with your post about "How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Times And Live?", i've seen how fitting old blues could be from the modern era in terms of lyrical content. It seems folks always have had the same troubles.

i lived and owned property in the flood plain, between the Big Muddy and Mississippi Rivers, which eventually flooded me out in 2008 (then in 2011 we seen the highest water rise since 1927). This had made me always kept my eye on the N.O.A.A. web-site for flood warnings.
i also checked back in history for flood records and became very accustomed to the waters rising and how far i could expect them to rise judging on rain fall and projections. As folks talk a lot about weird weather patterns and such, flooding on the Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio rivers is very common and has a long history (obviously because a song was written about it).
Actually, what is rare is that it sometimes it doesn't flood. In the early 2000s it didn't flood as much and quickly drained off when the rivers did get high, leaving many shocked when it started to flood again as if they had forgotten how often the Mississppi floods. Similar to panic about Earthquakes, Hurricanes, Wild fires and what not, the big blue ball keeps on rolling along


edit on 16-8-2011 by trika3000 because: (no reason given)



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