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I Am The State – You Must Beg Me For Permission To Engage In Productive Behavior

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posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 12:33 PM
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Because if you don’t, I'll fine you, raid you and destroy you.

You might think it is ridiculous that you should have to beg me for permission to engage in productive activity, but it’s for your own good. Only I can determine if you are worthy of engaging in productive behavior.

You must understand that if I allowed everyone to simply operate a business without asking me permission first, there might be too much competition. People might have too many choices and prices on consumer goods might fall too far for my crony compatriots to make a sizable profit.

By forcing you to get a license from me, I can ensure that productive behavior doesn’t run wild. I need poor people on my welfare subsidies to help keep me in power. I need farmers on my corn subsidies to help keep me in power. I need banks on my bailout subsidies to help keep me in power. If I allowed everyone to compete without restrictions or subsidies I would lose too much power, and that wouldn’t be good for my millions of government employees.

Poor people might create jobs by opening their own businesses on the cheap, such as selling hot dogs from their front porch or growing vegetables in their yards and selling them on street corners. Such actions would be a tragedy for humanity, which is why I have made it illegal to vend anything without a license in a proper commercial zone.

Let us go through an example to illustrate why competition is a horrible sin that must be regulated and licensed by me. Consider if you were the only hairstylist in the city of Chicago. You would be able to make millions of dollars a year because you would face no competition and could charge any price you wanted for providing a haircut. Isn’t it better that I help you keep making those profits by using force or coercion to prevent too many new hairstylist from opening up shops next to yours? Would’t you want me to make it as difficult as possible for anyone to open up a new hair salon? Of course you would, which is why I am here.

I make sure beauticians have to get licensed, salons have to get business licenses, and I make sure that there aren’t “too many” salons in a given area through zoning laws. Without me to protect your business, you might get run out of business by free market competition.

It is important that I be the one to decide if the services people offer are good enough for you to consume, for you are simply too dumb to figure this out on your own. If I wasn’t here to make sure doctors were forced to obtain a medical license, surely you would be too stupid to only visit doctors who were certified by a private certification agency or who had good consumer reviews. Most likely you would only visit witch doctors and snake oil salesmen.

I am your savior; I am your salvation. Without me you would face a world of hate filled cut throat competition. Thank me for protecting you from yourself.

playlist



edit on 12-8-2011 by mnemeth1 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 01:05 PM
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My husband owns a restaurant in Oregon, we are on the border of Or/Ca. He decided to start a place in Cali when a nice little front road place became available. we worked like dogs fixing it up painting and decorating all new, new tables and chairs the whole bit. The California inspector was a friend to the people who had lost the lease before the place went up for sale. he bullied even yelled at my husband even though we always do things better then needed. He said there was a grandfather law that now no longer applies and he was going to get us for everything he could. We had to put in new tile floors in the kitchen even though the floor was nice already, he made us have more freezers even though we had to much space for the business we was to do already so that crowded the kitchen, the kitchen was small but we had to have 2 sinks in the kitchen (because there was a drive through) and the one we had in the utility room for mops and cleaning and then another for hands in the space we had to build as "a dressing room" private space for our one wait person to put her apron over her cloths. 4 sinks in a tiny area...it went on and on they even made us add a floor length mirror in the restrooms (forcing us to rebuild and reinforce walls not meant to hang weight on)for handicapped to see themselves, not a safe thing IMO.
So we missed the beginning of the first tourist season since he refused to let us open, we opened in the middle of winter and took huge loses, had to close before we even started after spending hundred thousand plus on top of the lease, lic fees etc.
It would have grown like our business in Oregon and we would eventually have hired more then one more cook and waitperson besides ourselves, it would have helped jobs in our poor ex logging ex fishing community, they destroy business in Ca and tax and fee the hell out of you.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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Yeah my son was run out of the city park for trying to sell handmade walking sticks for the trails. Problem was not vending in the park it was vending in the park without the 250$ ´license´. Ironically that is the amount he was trying to make to cover his dorm deposit by the fruit of his own labor and hands( which he did by working his ass off for a sweat shop call center) ,his bad ,eh?
´and no one shall do business without the mark´
things are getting creepier every day.
seed



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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Some elements of licencing and oversight are necessary. So whilst not disagreeing with you the dangers of laizze faire can be deady.

victorian web


The list of poisonous additives reads like the stock list of some mad and malevolent chemist: strychnine, cocculus inculus (both are hallucinogens) and copperas in rum and beer; sulphate of copper in pickles, bottled fruit, wine, and preserves; lead chromate in mustard and snuff; sulphate of iron in tea and beer; ferric ferrocynanide, lime sulphate, and turmeric in chinese tea; copper carbonate, lead sulphate, bisulphate of mercury, and Venetian lead in sugar confectionery and chocolate; lead in wine and cider; all were extensively used and were accumulative in effect, resulting, over a long period, in chronic gastritis, and, indeed, often fatal food poisoning. Red lead gave Gloucester cheese its 'healthy' red hue, flour and arrowroot a rich thickness to cream, and tea leaves were 'dried, dyed, and recycled again.' As late as 1877 the Local Government Board found that approximately a quarter of the milk it examined contained excessive water, or chalk, and ten per cent of all the butter, over eight per cent of the bread, and 50 per cent of the gin had copper in them to heighten the color.



Indeed, as Wohl further points out, even luxury items for the relatively well off were hardly any better. The London County Country Medical Officer discovered, for example, the following in samples of ice cream: cocci, bacilli, torulae, cotton fiber, lice, bed bugs, bug's legs, fleas, straw, human hair, and cat and dog hair. Such contaminated ice cream caused diphtheria, scarlet fever, diarrhoea, and enteric fever. "The Privy Council estimated in 1862 that one-fifth of butcher's meat in England and Wales came from animals which were 'considerably diseased' or had died of pleuro-pneumonia, and anthacid or anthracoid diseases.


So I feel regulation can play a part in ensuring due dilligence which should be insisted upon for any business in the modern era. I understand it goes against the Libertarian sentiments and like all laws are constantly misused or ignored by the politicians and should be open to revision however many regulations are there for a purpose. Here in Britain for instance they can be selective about where one can open fast food establishments because of air and/or noise pollution with special regards to residential areas.
Other restrictions apply for aesthetic or residential reasons so they can't just plonk a factory in the middle of either rural nor residential areas without enquiries and people being allowed redress as to their objections.
Not all Government is bad, unfortunately it would appear to be in the hands of people that are.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by goldentorch
 


The flaw in your reasoning lies with the assumption that only the State is capable of rectifying those problems and that licensing can somehow prevent them from occurring in the first place.

Note that all of those problems occurred even though licensing and regulatory laws were in place.

Who discovered the problems in the first place? Was it government regulators or was it consumers reporting the problems first?

The market is capable of remedying those problems all on its own. I can assure you that if government regulatory agencies did not exist, private regulatory agencies would spring up to take their place. The most notable private regulatory agency today is called Consumer Reports. There would be a lot more Consumer Reports type organizations around if the State did not involve itself in business affairs, and people would pay a lot more attention to them before buying a product.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 


while i appreciate your stance me thinks you over-simplify a tad, perhaps. while i don't want to defend a governing body i'm confident that as a person with life experience you realize some checks and balances really are in place for the good of the people.

there are news stories every week of people who actually do go to unlicensed, unqualified people willing to do all sorts of medical procedures. dental, abortions, liposuction and plastic surgery comes to mind immediately. we read about it afterward, when someone is scarred for life or deceased from their poor choice.

i'd rather consume foods from a establishment that is well versed in proper good housekeeping practices and is scrutinized for their behavior than buy mystery meat on a stick from someone who won't speak to me in english on a city street corner. food handling licenses came about because people became ill so many times in the past. common sense isn't as common as it should be. by holding people responsible for their actions a higher level of safety is set for the good of the patrons.

i'll agree that as a society we are overwhelmed and overburdened by endless red tape and requirements. however we did not arrive where we are overnight. the many safety standards and practices that affect the workplace of america, for example, came about slowly and painfully. there was a time when wage earners could easily lose a body part any day they worked because of the lack of guards, grilles, shut-off devices and other such things. a lot of people suffered and died along the way. it would be stupid and cruel to not make use of protective safety features after witnessing the pains and deaths that took place along the way.

there are no free lunches. everything comes with a cost.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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And it's not just business that suffers.


When the media decide that [color=gold] predatory bureaucrats with a good-enough story to tell are entitled to constitutionally sanctioned protection, regardless of their truthfulness and recklessness, where does that leave us, the citizenry?

Wen Ho Lee: defamed Los Alamos scientist

The U.S. government and five news organizations will pay Lee $1.64 million for sliming him by publishing private information from his personnel files to support espionage allegations that nobody could ever prove and that apparently were unfounded. Lee spent nine months in solitary confinement and had his career destroyed, thanks largely to leaks from prosecutors that were breathlessly published in 1999 by some of the nation's best news organizations.



So the message is clear. Even if you have a lifetime of credentials and outstanding service to the government, it means nothing if it is decided that you must be discredited. Welcome to the church of State & Media in all of it's glorious union.


David Grouchy
edit on 12-8-2011 by davidgrouchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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Originally posted by LargeFries
reply to post by mnemeth1
 


while i appreciate your stance me thinks you over-simplify a tad, perhaps. while i don't want to defend a governing body i'm confident that as a person with life experience you realize some checks and balances really are in place for the good of the people.

there are news stories every week of people who actually do go to unlicensed, unqualified people willing to do all sorts of medical procedures. dental, abortions, liposuction and plastic surgery comes to mind immediately. we read about it afterward, when someone is scarred for life or deceased from their poor choice.

i'd rather consume foods from a establishment that is well versed in proper good housekeeping practices and is scrutinized for their behavior than buy mystery meat on a stick from someone who won't speak to me in english on a city street corner. food handling licenses came about because people became ill so many times in the past. common sense isn't as common as it should be. by holding people responsible for their actions a higher level of safety is set for the good of the patrons.

i'll agree that as a society we are overwhelmed and overburdened by endless red tape and requirements. however we did not arrive where we are overnight. the many safety standards and practices that affect the workplace of america, for example, came about slowly and painfully. there was a time when wage earners could easily lose a body part any day they worked because of the lack of guards, grilles, shut-off devices and other such things. a lot of people suffered and died along the way. it would be stupid and cruel to not make use of protective safety features after witnessing the pains and deaths that took place along the way.

there are no free lunches. everything comes with a cost.


Who's fault is it for someone choosing a bad doctor?

The doctor's fault for not getting a medical license or the consumer's fault for not even bothering to review the guy's history at all?

And further, can't a civil suit bring justice instead of a criminal suit for not being licensed?

Regulations are not necessary for a citizen to bring a civil suit against a fraudulent doctor that performs a bad surgery.



edit on 12-8-2011 by mnemeth1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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OSHA has similar issues of sillyness.

You have to wear a 12 foot safety line on scaffolding....that is only 8 feet in the air.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by LargeFries
reply to post by mnemeth1
 


while i appreciate your stance me thinks you over-simplify a tad, perhaps. while i don't want to defend a governing body i'm confident that as a person with life experience you realize some checks and balances really are in place for the good of the people.

there are news stories every week of people who actually do go to unlicensed, unqualified people willing to do all sorts of medical procedures. dental, abortions, liposuction and plastic surgery comes to mind immediately. we read about it afterward, when someone is scarred for life or deceased from their poor choice.

i'd rather consume foods from a establishment that is well versed in proper good housekeeping practices and is scrutinized for their behavior than buy mystery meat on a stick from someone who won't speak to me in english on a city street corner. food handling licenses came about because people became ill so many times in the past. common sense isn't as common as it should be. by holding people responsible for their actions a higher level of safety is set for the good of the patrons.

i'll agree that as a society we are overwhelmed and overburdened by endless red tape and requirements. however we did not arrive where we are overnight. the many safety standards and practices that affect the workplace of america, for example, came about slowly and painfully. there was a time when wage earners could easily lose a body part any day they worked because of the lack of guards, grilles, shut-off devices and other such things. a lot of people suffered and died along the way. it would be stupid and cruel to not make use of protective safety features after witnessing the pains and deaths that took place along the way.

there are no free lunches. everything comes with a cost.

On the same hand, a local shop where I live got threatened to be closed down because they did not have enough paper towels on their dispenser in the kitchen. They are a credible business who serves food that is taken care of well. Meanwhile this mystery meat you speak of is sold to us through unquestioned mega fast food companies by people who do not speak english.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by xPico
 


It really is disgusting.

The entire purpose of the State is to destroy competition and violate property rights. It is the exact opposite of everything it claims to uphold and protect.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 02:37 PM
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Originally posted by mnemeth1
It is the exact opposite of everything it claims to uphold and protect.


It's this nature of duality that conflicts exist.
The pendulum is always swinging.
Left and Right, liberal and conservative, democratic and republican.

Just sit down, chill... relax and center yourself and your environment will reflect what's inside and balance out. The cycle needs you to exist. If you choose to cease and desist, under what claims can they arrest you?

Think about it.
edit on 12-8-2011 by Nastradamus because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 


Firstly if you are referring to the offences alluded to in my post then the practices existed because there were actually no ordinances in place.
I am really looking forward to meeting this white suited mythical free marketeer you speak of, this man that only wants to make the absolute top quality goods at the very lowest price, no cut corners, no exploitation, no working children of 5 on blueberry farms to quote a recent post. Anyone can pick out points like that to counter your number of paper towels in the restroom.
I also have difficulty in passing regulatory responsibility to a commercial magazine, you complain that congress works for financial gain yet wish to strip them of that responsibility and pass it to an organisation that regulates for financial gain. A magazine of unelected journalists making decisions that could seriously impinge upon your life. What if you can't read? What protects you then?
It has more serious consequences as well. I was present at the Bradford City fire and should regulations have been in place many lives would have been saved.
Just to leave you on the notion of Government agencies and their ability to forward agenda without the need for financial rewards or gains other than the benefits of their citizens I'll leave you with Neil DeGrasse Tyson and his take on NASA and it's benefits for America.




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 


I suppose the simplistic thing to add is that you believe only the free market has the solutions.
2nd



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 04:26 PM
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Originally posted by goldentorch
reply to post by mnemeth1
 


I suppose the simplistic thing to add is that you believe only the free market has the solutions.
2nd


Name a law that has solved a problem.

Name one.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 


Perhaps before you ask him to name a law you might answer some of his questions/insights with something a bit more direct.

For Example:



Firstly if you are referring to the offences alluded to in my post then the practices existed because there were actually no ordinances in place.




I also have difficulty in passing regulatory responsibility to a commercial magazine, you complain that congress works for financial gain yet wish to strip them of that responsibility and pass it to an organisation that regulates for financial gain. A magazine of unelected journalists making decisions that could seriously impinge upon your life.




I was present at the Bradford City fire and should regulations have been in place many lives would have been saved.


In the interests of proper dialogue and etiquette a response to these above points would be expected before you asked a question or raised another point.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by LargeFries
 




while i appreciate your stance me thinks you over-simplify a tad, perhaps. while i don't want to defend a governing body i'm confident that as a person with life experience you realize some checks and balances really are in place for the good of the people....



You are SO naive. I used to believe that too until I started lifting up rocks and saw the corruption underneath.

Read SHIELDING THE GIANT: USDA's “Don't Look, Don't Know” Policy


...The facts demonstrating ConAgra's strong-arm tactics against a small producer perpetuate a longstanding USDA pattern where the messenger is blamed and chosen as the fall guy.

"Due to politically motivated, self-serving and arbitrary practices by the USDA, I have
been forced to list my business for sale," said John Munsell, owner of Montana
Quality Foods and whose experience with ConAgra and USDA is the catalyst for GAP's investigation. "My meat processing plant has been in my family for 57 years.
When I tried to report the truth of this tainted meat tragedy last summer, I learned that
the USDA is against the truth and for shielding the big guy from public embarrassment. The consumer and small producers like me are the losers in this game."

According to food inspection team members who have blown the whistle to GAP, the USDA shielded ConAgra by a policy that is nothing less than a another cover-up harmful to the consumer and public health. By its "Don't Look, Don't Know" policy for beef inspection, the USDA chose ignorance of the facts over the truth that ConAgra was given the seal of approval for meat that was infected with E. coli many months before the 19 million pounds of tainted beef recalled in June, 2002.

"Because of fear of reprisal, inspectors and veterinarians with the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) cannot come forward publicly and report the failures in the food safety system," said William G. Hughes, an official with the National Association of Federal Veterinarians. "A deliberate climate of fear intimidation has been created among those who actually conduct the in-plant inspections and oversight at meat processing plants."

... www.organicconsumers.org...



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 04:43 PM
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Originally posted by mnemeth1
Who's fault is it for someone choosing a bad doctor?

The doctor's fault for not getting a medical license or the consumer's fault for not even bothering to review the guy's history at all?

And further, can't a civil suit bring justice instead of a criminal suit for not being licensed?

Regulations are not necessary for a citizen to bring a civil suit against a fraudulent doctor that performs a bad surgery.


A doctor is simple.

What about a chemical?

Am I suppose to be able to analyze chemicals I ingest and know the long term effects?



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 04:51 PM
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This article illustrates how far off track the government has gone in their stiffling of business.


Small businesses losing out to red tape



.....cities and states stifle new small businesses at every turn, burying them in mounds of paperwork; lengthy, expensive and arbitrary permitting processes; pointless educational requirements for occupations; or even just outright bans.

Today, the Institute for Justice released a series of studies documenting government-imposed barriers to entrepreneurship in eight cities. In every city studied, overwhelming regulations destroyed or crippled would-be businesses at a time when they are most needed.



Time and again, these reports document how local bureaucrats believe they should dictate every aspect of a person's small business... if that means that businesses fail, or never open, or can operate only illegally, or waste all their money trying to get permits so they have nothing left for actual operations, that's just too bad....

Along the way, the dreams of individuals are repeatedly crushed:

•In Chicago, Esmeralda Rodriguez tried to open a children's play center, paying rent month after month while she waited in vain for the government permits she needed to open her business. After a full year of bureaucratic red tape, she finally exhausted her life savings and closed down for good....



•In Washington, D.C., hundreds of people have waited more than a year to take the required class and test to become a taxi driver. Rather than encourage these individuals to create jobs for themselves, the city has simply stopped offering the class and test.

When governments actually get rid of barriers to entrepreneurship, new businesses open almost immediately. Indeed, removing even a single law can unleash entrepreneurial energy and create hundreds of jobs. Mississippi finally got rid of its requirement that African hair braiders get government-issued cosmetology licenses to practice or teach. The result? A single entrepreneur — Melony Armstrong — trained dozens of women to braid hair and open their own businesses....



America was once known as the Land of Opportunity. It could be again, but not until state and local officials get out of the way of entrepreneurs trying to fulfill their dreams of new business and new prosperity for themselves and their families....
www.usatoday.com...



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