Goodbye internet privacy in canada.

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posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 02:57 AM
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This law will make using an alias a crime. It is not likely they will try to prosecute everyone using an alias online


That part makes me wonder if it will be a lot easier for hackers to steel peoples I.D.s., if you have to put your real info all over the web.

Let's get short wave radios, and chat in code like people in WW2.




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 03:09 AM
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Honestly.. I don't see this coming to anything. There is NO WAY anyone would agree to this,
and, i feel strongly that this is just another attempt from the Gov't to scare people into
submission, sort of like steering the Cattle in the direction they want. They couldnt
possibly do anything about this. Just look at all the cyber stalkers online, there are
thousands and thousands if not millions, and Nothing has been done about it. This
will never happen, People are far too intelligent to believe a handful of people who
use taxpayer money for this and tons of other ridiculous things to agree to it. This if
it did come to anything would create more havoc than the Gov't could ever deal with
on a physical level. It just won't happen.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 04:15 AM
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I see that Blackberry have promised the Brit government full cooperation in finding out who got in touch with who over the course of the British riots, using the Blackberry service, so it has already started in the UK.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 04:36 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


The Brits have an 'unwritten' constitution, no idea how that works, they also have the European declaration of human rights, both of which it seems can actually be used against private citizens, if you are not rich, and most Brits are not, there is not much hope of redress of grievance.
Like I typed in a previous thread, this is the chance the government has been waiting for, to further tighten the screw, The rioters have only made it worse for themselves, lack of education, just what the Brit government wanted.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 04:43 AM
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Same here in Germany with our interior minister Friedrich. I believe it's only the beginning


German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich’s call to end anonymity for internet bloggers in the wake of the Norway massacre has been slammed by the opposition and even the conservatives’ coalition partners, the Free Democrats.

Source: Friedrich's call to identify bloggers meets broad resistance - The Local



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 06:29 AM
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reply to post by Invariance
 


Thanks!

Going to send this to everyone I know!

# off with your draconian surveillance laws. Canada needs to stand up.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 07:02 AM
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reply to post by AzureSky
 

Correct me if I am wrong, but... Everyone thinks the internet is a free and public domain (within hindsight its not), so why not enforce local laws that are exercised in public (offline)?

If you want to change your name legally, you need to go through the court system. 'Public' aliases without a court's approval are illegal within the United States. Once anonymous names are banned, publicly online, maybe all these social networking uprisings will end. We all use aliases to protect ourselves from strangers, but it looks like people are now using them to engage in social anarchy.

Good Idea:
Aliases to protect ourselves from strangers.

Bad Idea:
Aliases to protect ourselves from the government, so we can burn down a city or organize a revolt.

People are abusing the core reason why we carry anonymous names. As a result of people abusing their freedoms, the world's governments may not have a choice but to enforce 'public' law.

What would happen if you start to scream at someone at a local store? Some police-officer would arrest you for disorderly conduct. Why not enforce those laws online?
edit on 8/12/2011 by Section31 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 07:21 AM
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FYI Bill C-51 is an act to amend the Food and Drugs Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts that are impacted by the the said proposed changes. A Bill introduced to Parlaiment that would tackle provacy issues would be C-101 to C-200 or a private members bill so C-500 and up. Also it would impact the CRTC, Canadian Radio-Television Communications Comission or the Privacy Act.

Frankly I don't think the Tories want to spend more money on public servents spying on Canadians, they are cutting jobs left right and centre. But thanks for starting a good debate.

www.parl.gc.ca...



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 08:24 AM
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reply to post by Bacontep
 


Actually, the bill your talking about over herbs was shot down because people didn't want it. This is ANOTHER bill recently proposed, just so happens to have the same name.

Globe and Mail article about bill C-51

Download the PDF from Parlament's website "Investigative Powers for the 21st Century Act"

Legislative Summary of Bill C-51
edit on 12-8-2011 by Invariance because: exec. summary link added



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by AzureSky
 


This makes total sense. The western world has been moving in this direction for years. It is just a baby step until you get your national/international id number which you will use for everything from purchases, internet, loans, phone call contracts, you name it.

The problems in England as well as the smaller riots in the US that are being organized on-line will be excellent fodder for the government to implement a national ID as well as shut social networks down on a whim.

After all, they're looking to keep us safe.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 09:01 AM
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What a bloody joke.

Im pretty sure this is illegal isnt it?

The internet is more and more like the outside world as we know it,politically correct...

Well im not going to shut up,im not going to back down,im not going to let them tell me what to think.

We will burn your cities down,shut down your internet,just keep pushing us,go on,youll regret it.

edit on 12-8-2011 by BillyBoBBizWorth because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by AzureSky
 


Maybe my memory's going, but seems to me just a year or two ago authorities were still telling people, kids, teens to NEVER post personal information on the Net - NEVER use your real name, never post pictures, never never never give out your address or phone number and for gawdsake, do NOT tell anyone what your birthday is.

'Course Yahoo always demanded full disclosure - and when that failed, Facebook carried the ball.

Look like a strategy?


S&F&
btw



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Yeah, but producers of malicious software, spyware, viruses, hackers and hacker groups like Anonymous and their affiliates, criminal activity, child predators, exploiters/pornographers etc. have made anonymity online too dangerous... THEY don't want your freedom, they don't want you to expose yourselves to unnecessary risks such as identity theft etc, they want accountability and responsibility.

Laws which make it easier use effective surveillance methods to track down cyber-criminals who hide behind online anonymity.

If you have nothing to hide, why would that be a problem?

This is less like an invasion of privacy, and more like passing through security going into a facility, office etc.

For the vast majority of people online, nothing will change.

But, it could be a slippery slope, so freedom loving people everywhere should monitor these moves and stay as informed as possible, but regardless these changes will come eventually and you can thank the criminals for making it all possible. People should be able to support rational and logical changes to make the internet a safer place for everyone, and a much more dangerous place for cyber-crime and cyber-criminals.

Are they going to catch them all? .... No, but they can make it much more difficult for them to hide, and/or easier to track them down.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade
 


You're kidding, right?

Real criminals have it covered - false identities, false Ip addresses, the works. The rest of us - and our children - have only "anonymity" to protect ourselves and our loved ones from identity theft and getting targeted by crazies.

Those with something to hide know how to hide - this law won't even touch the real bad guys - it's designed for population control, to prevent open democratic discourse.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 09:59 AM
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Wow I am sorry you guys had this. But I have good news which is probably temporary. You can always use Tor

unless they have taken measures against it. But then again, the U.S army uses it aswell to protect the anonymity of the soldiers during their operations.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 10:07 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


You'd be surprised what can be done with detailed, long term IP logs, in depth investigation, surveillance and deep packet inspection methods... If implemented with new laws and powers, anonymity and criminal activity online would be much more difficult.




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by AzureSky
 


At least they are letting you know! Chances are, they have been doing it for years!

The U.S. has been doing it for a long time, it's called the NSA.

Like it or not, this is something we are all gonna have to get used to!



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 10:21 AM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade
 



You'd be surprised what can be done with detailed, long term IP logs, in depth investigation, surveillance and deep packet inspection methods...


Not really - tracking technology is already effective. There's no real reason to outlaw Internet anonymity except for population control.



If implemented with new laws and powers, anonymity and criminal activity online would be much more difficult.


Erm. Anonymity would be illegal - criminal activity online will continue as usual - ordinary people will be more vulnerable to government/corporate controls and criminal targeting.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 10:24 AM
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Originally posted by soficrow

Not really - tracking technology is already effective.


True, but lacking the legal framework to make it much more effective, but THEY are working on that.




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade
 


You keep ignoring my main point:

There's no real reason to outlaw Internet anonymity except for population control.





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