Goodbye internet privacy in canada.

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posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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Goodbye internet privacy in canada.


canadianawareness.org

Where are internet aliases most commonly used by Canadians today? They are almost universally used in internet forums, bloggers’ comments sections, and comment sections of other websites. This law will make using an alias a crime. It is not likely they will try to prosecute everyone using an alias online but it will give the government the means to identify and criminalize anyone who writes anything the government disapproves of. Imagine an internet where Canadians were forbidden by law to speak anonymously.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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Well well, seems like this is happening all over the world now isnt it? Now we as canadians will not be allowed to have an Online alias. According to this bill, they will also have surveillance powers for your internet connect, will be able to attain all of your personal information, and be able to track specific types of data, be able to access it without a warrant. AND THEY DONT HAVE TO TELL YOU.

If you are investigated at your local isp, the isp is not required to call you, and tell you about it. Neither are the cops. Goodbye downloading, Goodbye privacy. Fight this bill canada, We cannot allow this.

canadianawareness.org
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:01 AM
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The control grid is trying to get tighter.... good find OP



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:01 AM
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Welcome to the United States of Canada



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:03 AM
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Originally posted by Ben81
Welcome to the United States of Canada


Lol,
Pretty much right?
I have another story for you as well guys.

Tory crime bill attack on our liberty


The Conservatives plan on introducing an omnibus crime bill when the House resumes that wraps all of their previous legislation into one.

The bill is promoted as allowing police to track and prosecute the perverts passing around child pornography and allows them to update their monitoring techniques to deal with the ever-changing computerized world we live in.

Sounds fine. What could be wrong with that?

In fact, there’s nothing wrong with that part, but there is plenty to worry about in what they propose to do regarding hate crimes.

The bill plans to make it a crime to link to any website that promotes hatred.

Here’s what the Library of Parliament says about the bill on its website: “Clause 5 of the bill provides that the offences of public incitement of hatred and wilful promotion of hatred may be committed by any means of communication and include making hate material available, by creating a hyperlink that directs web surfers to a website where hate material is posted, for example.”

For simply posting a link to a website that has material someone else deems hateful, you could go to jail for two years and be branded a criminal.


Lets compile a list of hate material shall we? Lets so..i see a lot of anti-government stuff here. Hate towards the government. So me linking ATS, could possibly land me in jail for two years. Fun isn't it?
edit on 11/8/11 by AzureSky because: (no reason given)
edit on 11/8/11 by AzureSky because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:08 AM
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Is "free speech" as important to the people who live on this planet as is seems to be a threat to those who want to control them?

When you express your thoughts and opinions, do you force others to agree?

No, only governments do that.

I think all these restrictive measures should be placed on them, not us.

To all my Canadian friends..... sorry for your troubles.... I hope you can make the ivory-tower elites see reason; although I doubt they'll listen; after all; without fear and threats, they have nothing to work with.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:08 AM
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What garbage.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by AzureSky
 


Until they ban proxies, vpns, and encryption, I'm not that worried, might end up costing me an extra 5-10$ a month on top of my phonebill. No one should be surprised by this, if you are caught off guard you must have been sleeping for several years. Harper promised he'd pass this bill, and the instant he "won" a "majority" we knew he'd ram it down our throats.

You've got several years AFTER this goes into effect before the telcos will have the system in place and running. What we can expect though, is some smaller isps to tank and get bought up ( part of the plan ) then traffic shaping technology will be implemented across the board (where it isn't already, I'm looking at YOU Rogers.) so you'll see much slower speeds during peek times, as well as rate increases as the government sure isn't going to foot the multi-billion dollar bill.

See, you have to admit, Harper is a genius with this. He's killing several birds with 1 large dick shaped stone:

Legalize going after dissenters and activists online

Legalize the illegal wiretapping system currently in place in the US, and bring it to Canadian soil to monitor ALL communications of ALL citizens in real time.

Cave to the US MPAA / RIAA lobbyists pushing for extreme limits on what we can do with our content.

Force the smaller, friendlier ISPS, out of business allowing large Corporations to swallow them up and expand their monopoly over telecommunications in Canada.

All of this slowly, but steadily, leading towards Internet 2.0 which, if any of you are old enough to remember, will look a hell of a lot like Compuserv.


BTW this article is from May in case anyone was wondering.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:10 AM
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Canada will prove to be an excellent test-bed for this agenda before the US makes moves to push through similar laws and legislation.

Canada has always been a good test subject for the USA.






posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:12 AM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwaters
reply to post by AzureSky
 


Until they ban proxies, vpns, and encryption, I'm not that worried, might end up costing me an extra 5-10$ a month on top of my phonebill. No one should be surprised by this, if you are caught off guard you must have been sleeping for several years. Harper promised he'd pass this bill, and the instant he "won" a "majority" we knew he'd ram it down our throats.

You've got several years AFTER this goes into effect before the telcos will have the system in place and running. What we can expect though, is some smaller isps to tank and get bought up ( part of the plan ) then traffic shaping technology will be implemented across the board (where it isn't already, I'm looking at YOU Rogers.) so you'll see much slower speeds during peek times, as well as rate increases as the government sure isn't going to foot the multi-billion dollar bill.

See, you have to admit, Harper is a genius with this. He's killing several birds with 1 large dick shaped stone:

Legalize going after dissenters and activists online

Legalize the illegal wiretapping system currently in place in the US, and bring it to Canadian soil to monitor ALL communications of ALL citizens in real time.

Cave to the US MPAA / RIAA lobbyists pushing for extreme limits on what we can do with our content.

Force the smaller, friendlier ISPS, out of business allowing large Corporations to swallow them up and expand their monopoly over telecommunications in Canada.

All of this slowly, but steadily, leading towards Internet 2.0 which, if any of you are old enough to remember, will look a hell of a lot like Compuserv.


BTW this article is from May in case anyone was wondering.


Yeah its an older article on the bill, but i used the search function and it was not here. I was doing research on the banning of natural foods in canada, which is also named C-51. Then came across this.

VPN's proxies and all that are good, but what about the normal person who has no clue? How many innocent people are going to be incarcerated for posting links someone else deems hateful? or downloading? or anything like that?

It kind of ties in with harper expanding the prison system.. Hmm.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by AzureSky
 


In the days of old one could enter a town at a public function, stand on a table and call out for attention and be heard. This was and is very much the same as coming online and speaking your mind. Canadian's should fight this bill tooth and nail before the digitally signed cage is surrounding your person, monitoring and judging you in real time.

Very dangerous stuff indeed.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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Originally posted by TheRemedial
reply to post by AzureSky
 


In the days of old one could enter a town at a public function, stand on a table and call out for attention and be heard. This was and is very much the same as coming online and speaking your mind. Canadian's should fight this bill tooth and nail before the digitally signed cage is surrounding your person, monitoring and judging you in real time.

Very dangerous stuff indeed.


Will try my best. And not to sound like some sort of recruitment officer, or some sort of organizer. But please tell every canadian you know, the more people who spread the story to one person, will then tell at least one other person. And so on.

Fight for your rights.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:53 AM
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Originally posted by AzureSky

Fight for your rights.


Does anyone in a "free" society actually have the 'right' to be anonymous?

This will be the ultimate question in the debates on this agenda moving forward.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by Fractured.Facade

Originally posted by AzureSky

Fight for your rights.


Does anyone in a "free" society actually have the 'right' to be anonymous?

This will be the ultimate question in the debates on this agenda moving forward.


7th and 8th section of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms states

Section 7: right to life, liberty, and security of the person.
Section 8: freedom from unreasonable search and seizure.

link

My internet presence, is the security of my person, a lot of my information is here, and its my right to have the secured by my own means.

Unreasonable search and seizure, is what they plan to do when they take your information/data/monitor your internet, because they do not need a warrant, they can search anyone for anything, even if they've done nothing wrong. Unreasonable.
edit on 11/8/11 by AzureSky because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by AzureSky
 


How do you see that as supporting the right to online anonymity?

Please, elaborate.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by Fractured.Facade

Originally posted by AzureSky

Fight for your rights.


Does anyone in a "free" society actually have the 'right' to be anonymous?

This will be the ultimate question in the debates on this agenda moving forward.


Well, one could argue the opposite;

Does anyone have the "right" to know who spoke a certain phrase, from whence does the authority come to "command" you identify yourself?



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 12:02 PM
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Originally posted by Fractured.Facade
reply to post by AzureSky
 


How do you see that as supporting the right to online anonymity?

Please, elaborate.


I don't need to really elaborate for you, im merely presenting the information and my opinion of it.

I like having an alias, I like the entire internet not knowing my name and address and every other tidbit of information. Are you canadian?



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 12:02 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


I hear you Max, just trying to see how arguments will play out over this issue as these agendas are pushed forward.

There seems to be a movement in many governments now seeking to eliminate online anonymity, not limit freedom online (not yet) but to eliminate anonymity.

Behind the cloak of anonymity online, anything is possible... What if there were no such thing, and everyone had to carry with them their true identity in everything they do online?



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 12:07 PM
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Originally posted by Fractured.Facade
reply to post by Maxmars
 


I hear you Max, just trying to see how arguments will play out over this issue as these agendas are pushed forward.

There seems to be a movement in many governments now seeking to eliminate online anonymity, not limit freedom online (not yet) but to eliminate anonymity.

Behind the cloak of anonymity online, anything is possible... What if there were no such thing, and everyone had to carry with them their true identity in everything they do online?


Then it would be twice as easy for big corps to get your information. Much easier for malicious hackers to get your information. Identity theft will soar because all the information will be available right there. Being Anonymous on the web is very important when it comes to that. I'm not going to come on ATS with my full name right there for everyone to see.

Nor any website for that matter, its putting myself at risk. I know people who's lives have been ruined because of their name, with their name and you can get almost any amount of information on someone. Its just expediting it.

Not to mention that planning a peaceful protest, or anything of that sort, will land you in jail as well most likely. Freedom of speech and expression issues right there.
edit on 11/8/11 by AzureSky because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 12:38 PM
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My whole law firm is fighting against this travesty. Partners are reviewing it and deciding if they are going to send a information package to the PM's office.

I can tell you that right now this bill is just spinning its wheels over in Ottawa. I'll do anything I can to keep it that way.

Private people also need to send a notice to their MPs and the PM himself. Put them on notice that you do not support it and even if it passes you deny them permission to enforce it on you. Legal protection now granted.

-Lightrule





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