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Iditarod

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posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 10:24 PM
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Realistically, can you imagine the challenge of this test.The biting winds are are at your face nonstop.The only real comfort are your dogs,it must be the toughest challenge imaginaginable.




posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 10:38 PM
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What are we even talking about ? Or am I lost ?



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 10:38 PM
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edit on 10-8-2011 by Heartisblack because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 10:40 PM
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Originally posted by Heartisblack
What are we even talking about ? Or am I lost ?



Perhaps you just lost the 'challenge' !




posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 10:40 PM
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posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 10:50 PM
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Originally posted by LadyS
reply to post by Heartisblack
 


Be lost, no more...



Thank you, but yes the poor dogs are suffering.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by Heartisblack

Thank you, but yes the poor dogs are suffering.


Given you were not aware of the Iditarod in the first place, I suspect you are passing judgement prematurely...




posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 11:00 PM
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Originally posted by LadyS

Originally posted by Heartisblack

Thank you, but yes the poor dogs are suffering.


Given you were not aware of the Iditarod in the first place, I suspect you are passing judgement prematurely...



I read the article, those poor animals being pushed to run in the cold ? Ice on their paws and whatnot ? If you were a dog would you want to be out there ? I knew about the sled racing but not what it was called.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by brindle
 


Most of what I know of it is from this movie...Iron Will
From the point of view of my couch it looks like something I might want to do,
if I was born and raised by wolves or something. lol Maybe in my next life.
I am enthralled with and respect the people who do this, but I respect the animals a little bit more.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by Heartisblack

Originally posted by LadyS
reply to post by Heartisblack
 


Be lost, no more...



Thank you, but yes the poor dogs are suffering.


They don't suffer. They're looked after well, and they only run the dogs that love it. They love to run, and they love to pull things.

They're raised in the cold, and tested before they race, even little things like to see how well they sleep on the snow. If the snow is wet under the dog after they wake, they'll lose too much body heat, they become a pet, not a racer.

If a dog has to leave the race for whatever reason (vets check them at every stop), they make sure they get home in good care.

In places it gets really cold in the winter, many dogs will grow fur under their feet too. My dogs get very furry feet in the winter, even though they're in the house mostly, except for the lab that loves loves loves the snow and the cold.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 07:58 AM
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These dogs are not suffering, it's what they're bred for. In their blood.... they are most happy in a harsh winter environment. My 60 lb female (below) is able to pull 1,000 lbs for more than five miles and after that she wants to play. The male (Bandit) is more of a lap dog at this point


Bandit


Alaska




posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:00 AM
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Originally posted by Heartisblack

Originally posted by LadyS

Originally posted by Heartisblack

Thank you, but yes the poor dogs are suffering.


Given you were not aware of the Iditarod in the first place, I suspect you are passing judgement prematurely...



I read the article, those poor animals being pushed to run in the cold ? Ice on their paws and whatnot ? If you were a dog would you want to be out there ? I knew about the sled racing but not what it was called.


If anything, you have to hold these dogs back, not push them to run. Siberian Huskies run... it's in their blood. Also, they make special booties for their paws
If I was a lab I'd wanna be on a couch somewhere... if I was a Husky I'd wanna be out running. It's just what they do.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:05 AM
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The Siberian Husky's coat is thicker than that of of most breeds of dogs, comprising two layers: a dense undercoat and a longer topcoat of short, straight guard hairs. It protects the dogs effectively against harsh Arctic winters, but the coat also reflects heat in the summer. It is able to withstand temperatures as low as −50 °C to −60 °C.[7] The undercoat is often absent during shedding.

Originally bred by nomadic peoples of the Chukchi Tribe, of Siberia. The Siberian Husky was developed to provide transportation over the vast frozen land. The dog is tough and strong. They are able to quickly cover long distances on very little food. They are also bred to have a gentle nature and are an intrigal part of everyday family life.

They have an extreme desire to run. They are beautiful, captivating, eager, outgoing, animated canine companions. They certainly require special effort to obtain successful ownership!



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:41 AM
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reply to post by Skorpiogurl
 


Your dogs are absolutely beautiful.
Huskies are one of those dogs that stay playful and puppylike most of their lives.


They have an extreme desire to run. They are beautiful, captivating, eager, outgoing, animated canine companions. They certainly require special effort to obtain successful ownership!



If anything, you have to hold these dogs back, not push them to run. Siberian Huskies run... it's in their blood. Also, they make special booties for their paws If I was a lab I'd wanna be on a couch somewhere... if I was a Husky I'd wanna be out running. It's just what they do.

I rescued a Siberian Husky once, at the end of his life. He had cancer. He lasted about a year after I got him. At 11 years old, and cancerous, you still couldn't hold him back. He was like a great big puppy, and didn't slow down until the very end when he had a stroke. It was a good thing we had acreage.

My silly lab, a golden one, has the thickest fur, and he loves the cold, and snow. I watch him from the window, and instead of wanting in when he gets cold, he starts to run around the yard, scooping up the snow as he runs

He's 4, and thinks he's still a puppy. I keep a good eye on him, it's often -30 celcius where we live. He barely wants out in the summer, in the winter, he barely wants in. Only for water, and then he wants right back out. He does sleep indoors. Crazy dog......
My shepherd cross, also has husky and coyote genes, is 10 now, and just wants to be inside all the time. She's on the bed 80% of the time.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 


Thanks so much, as you can see by the photo's they are my babies!

My friends and family who have other breeds always give me crap because I never let them off the leash when we are out and about. I simply can't! My dogs are very well trained but all it takes is one small distraction and he or she would be gone forever! People who don't have Sibes don't understand the amazing differences between their breed and other breeds of dogs. Very, very manipulative and yes, so playful always!

My male sibe wants nothing to do with the summer months. He is happy in the house laying near the a/c. My female will stay outside for ever. In the winter they simply thrive! Make tunnels, run around for hours digging in the snow, tracking with their "snow noses", rolling around
it's awesome watching their natural instinct come out in the winter months.




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