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Expanding Earth Theory

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posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 07:52 PM
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If the Earth is expanding, growing larger...like a balloon or pumping up a ball. What happens to the density and gravity? Will there be less gravity?





posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 07:54 PM
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There's at least two or three threads on this exact same topic already. Search is your friend.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by blazenresearcher
 


It is already posted man. I'm sorry.

Here : www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by blazenresearcher
 


Gravity depends only on mass. If the Earth were expanding, its gravity would stay the same, if it wasn't gaining mass in the process.
The only difference would be how fast the force of gravity goes to zero within the Earth. The force of gravity is strongest at the surface and decreases linearly to the center. If the radius of the Earth was increasing, that linear decrease would happen at a slower rate - as the surface gravity would stay the same (about 9.81 m/s^2), while it still tends to zero at the center, over a larger radius.
edit on 10-8-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


Thank you for your response to my question and just not direct me somewhere else. So, are you saying by your calculation that gravity would be less than it is now?



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by blazenresearcher
 


Surface gravity would be exactly the same as it is now.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 

Are you sure?
Surface gravity depends on the mass and radius of the body (and thus indirectly the density) . Presumably both would be affected by the expansion, unless somehow they happen stay in perfect balance with the mass increasing with the square of the increase in radius.

g = G * M / r^2
edit on 8/10/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Sorry, I was laughing too hard at According to Jim to think straight for a minute. The force of gravity stays the same, so, yes, surface gravity decreases with increasing radius.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I'm not a scientist nor understand the calculations, however somehow if the mass was compacted and dense...there would be more gravity. If the mass was expanded and "less dense" there would be less gravity...in my opinion.


edit on 10-8-2011 by blazenresearcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by blazenresearcher
 

You're correct.
That's what the equation says.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by blazenresearcher
 


The force of gravity, itself, only depends on how much mass there is, it doesn't depend on how compact/dense that mass is. The surface gravity only decreases because, as the force of gravity at any given point stays the same, the surface is moving further out, which means it's located at a point where the gravitational force is lower (the force of gravity decreases with the square of distance). This means the surface gravity is lower.

But, again, the force of gravity, itself, doesn't change, since it depends only on how much mass there is.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:26 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


It only says that if you define "gravity" to mean "surface gravity".



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by Phage
 


It only says that if you define "gravity" to mean "surface gravity".
eh im sleptical of this is earth expanded wouldnt there be more water and earth wouldnt places be sinking from more water? and wouldnt more islands or earth be here?



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks Phage...wow I was right! Just learn the equations and I could rule the world....mwaahahhaaa! LOL!



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:30 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 

Yeah. Well.
For most of us surface gravity is what counts.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:30 PM
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reply to post by shadowreborn89
 


It depends on how the Earth is expanding. If it's increasing in size without gaining any mass, then the force of gravity stays the same and surface gravity decreases. If it's increasing in size because it's gaining mass, then the force of gravity increases and surface gravity could be decreasing, staying the same, or increasing...it depends on how much the Earth is expanding for how much mass is being added.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


But, then, I'd expect someone like you to pay attention to terminology... especially when mistaking the two could lead to confusion. In this instance, it's important to note that the force of gravity in no way depends on density. Just because mass is crammed into a smaller volume, that doesn't mean gravity gets stronger.

Hmm...or maybe it's just me
Regardless, I'm just tickled to be talking to Phage, himself. If I had a picture of you, I'd ask for an autograph. Though, I suppose, if I had a picture of you, I'd probably try to keep that to myself. Who needs a restraining order.
edit on 10-8-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:45 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 

It sure does, if you're on the surface or at a given altitude above it. Consider a neutron star. The force of gravity on its surface is substantially greater than that on the "surface" of a star of equal mass. Now, if you're inside the body it gets a little trickier because you have the mass above you to consider (as you pointed out).

Unless you're talking about big G. You're right, that doesn't change. But I really don't think that's what's being discussed.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Technically, I'm talking about F-sub-g ("big G" is merely the constant of proportionality for F-sub-g). And, of course, you're right, density has a huge affect on surface gravity. But surface gravity (g) isn't the force of gravity (F-sub-g), and the force of gravity depends only on mass.

It wasn't clear to me, from the OP, that surface gravity was the thing being discussed, as it was just referred to as "gravity". If it is, then we would be fully justified in saying that gravity decreases as the Earth expands (if it is, in fact, expanding...which is another issue entirely). So long as we understand that density has no effect on the force of gravity, itself.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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Gentlemen, thank you both (Phage and CLPrime). I actually followed all this and learned something today....




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