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Loch Ness monster might actually exist

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posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


Excellent, excellent, excellent!!



Rainbows
Jane




posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 

Thank you & OP for for your post. It's been a while since I have seen any new news in quite a while.
I'm Scottish an Urquhart, so thank you for the wonderful photos of my Castle. I had planned on visiting in Sept
as the International Sheep Dog Competitions are in Northern Scotland this year followed by the
World Trials in Cumbria, England for the 1st time. The World Trials are held every 3 yrs. But due to the
economy I won't be able to attend...bummer cause I have friends going over to compete, but MOST of all wanted to visit Urquhart Castle & the Loch Ness...

Cheers
Ektar



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 03:41 AM
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Originally posted by pause4thought

'Course they haven't. Have you ever tried holding a camera in one hand while feeding a hungry animal with the other?

star for that!


Originally posted by pause4thought
Some have suggested caves may well link one loch to the next, thereby eventually giving access to the sea..


What does having access to other lochs and the sea have to do with it?

edit on 12/8/11 by Versa because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 04:09 AM
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same with megalodon.

supposed to have died out 1-2 mill yo.

why the collective conscience of sharks and not sea monsters?

my ancestors must have been eaten on a regular basis coz i am really scared of sharks.

but sea monsters like nessie, not so much.




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 06:10 AM
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reply to post by angelchemuel
 


You made my day.




reply to post by Ektar
 


I commiserate you on not being able to get there. Is there anywhere else so idyllic?



reply to post by Versa
 


Thank you.


Another reason why photographic evidence is hard to come by is the sheer remoteness of the location. (It is one of only two places in Britain I have ever seen wild deer.) Yes, there are plenty of tourists in summer, but they generally just drive past & maybe stop at one of the two visitor centres. And the stretch of water is so enormous that even the small number of local people (farmers, shepherds) very rarely see anything that they consider worth reporting.


What does having access to other lochs and the sea have to do with it?

It has to do with the availability of food. While there are shoals of salmon, trout and sea trout, you might expect any self-respecting hungry monster to be on the look out for more substantial delicacies. There might even be the possibility of a migration pattern.

Have I got your interest?

OK, let's get serious.

Let's jump straight in at the deep end and have a look at a list of land-based sightings. *I apologise that you might have to change your signature*

Mind your step

It's worth letting this sink in. The phenomenon goes way beyond a few dark movements way out across the waves.

But let's also look at some of the reported water-based sightings.

In its natural element

Food for thought?

Now let's turn to sonar-based evidence. Nessie does appear to be an elusive target — yet not entirely able to frustrate the efforts of the more determined researcher.

Peering into the depths

Also take a good look at the separate report on Operation Deepscan, which confirms what I said previously about significant contacts. Quote: "...three strong sonar contacts, larger than would be expected from a freshwater loch... all the contacts were larger than a shark but smaller than a whale..."

Also check out the Drawings and Opinions, 1 & 2 and the copious other analyses of film-based evidence, etc.

Living in such serene surroundings is it any wonder the creature keeps a low profile? Maybe we should be content to allow the loch to retain its element of mystery. After all, how many magical places are there left on earth?



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 06:56 AM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


Yet another excellent, excellent, excellent!

Can you explain the S&F thing to me please? One of the 'mysteries' of ATS to me I am afraid!

I love the Highlands of Scotland especially the Trossacks in Autumn. Tranquility, tranquility, tranquility!

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by angelchemuel
 


You are very kind. (You seem to have a gift for making people happy.)

I do find this issue inspiring. Perhaps we can whet a few more people's appetites with a live webcam:


Take a look


(Remember to have your screen capture device at the ready.
)

PS Sent a message to explain stars & flags.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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Originally posted by pause4thoughtPerhaps we can whet a few more people's appetites with a live webcam:


Take a look


(Remember to have your screen capture device at the ready.
)


thanks now I'll be staring at the loch all night now



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Versa
 


Well I've just glanced at it for only the second time & there was something out there. (It's not going to making the headlines, though.)









It was moving slowly across the screen from right to left. TBH if a photo enhancement expert drifts in here I expect they'll blow it up to show a little boat. Then again maybe the beast sensed those who were watching meant no harm, and...



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 12:40 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


does look like its probably a yacht...




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by Versa
 


Nice work.



Incidentally the Project Urquhart section of the site referred to above also has some interesting information on further instances of (sonar-based) tracking of large targets below the surface (towards the bottom of the page).

I dare say Ektar, the project's namesake, might find this of particular interest.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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Firstly a big thank you to pause4thought for the PM alerting me to this thread.


As I stated in another thread, I watched the recent BBC documentary where they mapped the Loch via sonar and found nothing. They spoke of the geological structure of the Loch and stated that caves do not form in this rock type. It appears they weren't quite correct there with the information posted about warm water pockets and vents. Also, the local who found the deeper area helps to sway their theory away a tad.

I left that documentary feeling sad, quite frankly. Ever since I was a small child I have been fascinated by the possibility of such creatures living amongst us. My hopes have been lifted again! I still like to think that one day we will get that clear photo, piece of video footage or positive sonar hit.

Also – I love this quote by pause4thought –“Maybe we should be content to allow the loch to retain its element of mystery. After all, how many magical places are there left on earth?”

I’m now typing ‘Loch Ness’ into Google with renewed enthusiasm



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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If you study zoology you'll discover that many species considered myth, legend, or extinct were photographed as real creatures and accepted by science to exist or have existed in time with enough research. The Tasmanian Tiger is a good example of an animal being thought of as cryptology that made the cross into legitimate zoology. Not even talking about underwater creatures here, something that lived on land that was considered myth or legend that was found to be real. Take into account that we know so little about our worlds oceans and it's not hard to believe that there may be much more going on down there than we believe.



posted on Aug, 14 2011 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by Thestargateisreal
 


The Tasmanian Tiger (Thylacine), was an animal that existed up until not all that long ago. They were in Zoo's around up until around 1933. They aren't a creature that was thought to have been extinct for millions of years.

They were hunted mercilessly by settlers wanting to protect sheep flocks.

Personally I don't believe them to be extinct now. I live in Australia and can vouch for the ruggedness of the Tasmanian wilderness they inhabit. To say to me that hunters and farmers (chasing the Tasmanian Tiger bounty that was on offer), wiped every single one of them from this area is bordering on the impossible. I truly believe they are alive in pockets throughout the area. Sightings are still made. Again, some sightings may be hoaxes but I'm sure not all of them are.

I think of it in a similar way to attempting to wipe out every Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes, an introduced species), from an area in South Australia the size of Tasmania. It would be nigh on impossible. Even without the same harsh wilderness present in Tassie.

The way Tasmanian Tigers were treated makes me sad. Uneducated fools attempting to destroy something they don't understand or that they fear.



posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 09:32 AM
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I have visited Loch Ness many times and I feel sorry for Ektar for his delayed
union with Urquhart Castle. The loch is vast and I know from personal experiences,
that the waves, wind and sun can make an observer see strange sights upon it's
surface.
The road on the North-West side is very busy in Summer time and chances of any
land sightings seems remote and with the amount of traffic, I'll wager that if a creature
attempted a land-crossing, this site would be inundated with images of a large humped
roadkill!

I am a sceptic on most of the phenomena on this site and knowing of the expeditions
throughout the recent times of Loch Ness, the idea of a large 'beastie' staying hidden
in the peaty-waters seems doubtful.

But... standing on the shore below the ruins of the castle and looking into the sudden
darkness of the chilly waters... it seems my very core whispers that something big is
waiting... and maybe watching.




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