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Loch Ness monster might actually exist

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posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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Experts in marine life have claimed that monsters, such as the Loch Ness monster and the Abominable Snowman, which have been sighted in records, might actually exist in reality.

Because scientists are still finding new species of underwater life, the discovery of ‘marine monsters’ is not impossible, the experts said.

“The huge number of ‘sea monster’ sightings now on record can’t all be explained away as mistakes, sightings of known animals or hoaxes,” the Daily Mail quoted palaeontologist Dr Darren Naish of the University of Portsmouth, as saying.

Some experts are convinced of the existence of the Abominable Snowman called Yeti, a hairy ape-like creature who lives in the Himalayas.

Loch Ness Monster or Nessie (affectionately known by locals) reportedly dwells in the cold, murky depths of Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands.


This article is from last month but it is still a good article.

Good to see such subjects being taken seriously in main stream science though.

The more and more credible scientists we have on the team trying to find proof or even evidence of such creatures the better.

Any thoughts?

Pred...




posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 05:10 PM
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Watch out, debunkers who haven't even left their home city let alone explored the deep jungles/forests/waters of the world will soon arrive and arrogantly declare as fact that none of these creatures exist.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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reply to post by predator0187
 


That's pretty cool. I fear if we did find Nessy or Yetis to be real we would make sure we drove them to extinction before long!

Peace



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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Loch Ness is part of the Great Glenn supervolcano. Scientists from Plymouth university are currently studying the Lochs 'floor' with remote cameras, and have found that indeed there is some 'venting' going on down there producing warm water which in turn have allowed some tiny species of marine life to grow to the size of your fist. They have said that this could be 'food' for Nessie.

www.lochness.co.uk...

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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Originally posted by Tachalka
reply to post by predator0187
 


That's pretty cool. I fear if we did find Nessy or Yetis to be real we would make sure we drove them to extinction before long!

Peace


See, I think the opposite. I think if either were proven to exist there would be laws preserving them. In B.C. They already have a law that your not allowed to shoot a Bigfoot if you have an encounter.

I think the wilderness would be preserved more as there would be a large primate living in there. I think the same would be for nessy. There would be so many scientists exploring and finding out more and new information that these creatures would be so protected.

Pred...



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 05:24 PM
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Originally posted by predator0187

Originally posted by Tachalka
reply to post by predator0187
 


That's pretty cool. I fear if we did find Nessy or Yetis to be real we would make sure we drove them to extinction before long!

Peace


See, I think the opposite. I think if either were proven to exist there would be laws preserving them. In B.C. They already have a law that your not allowed to shoot a Bigfoot if you have an encounter.

I think the wilderness would be preserved more as there would be a large primate living in there. I think the same would be for nessy. There would be so many scientists exploring and finding out more and new information that these creatures would be so protected.

Pred...


I think if someone tried to shoot one, they'd quickly find themselves without arms... and I'm not talking missing guns.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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reply to post by predator0187
 




Why is it always Nessie.
Can't Champie exist too?



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by VforVendettea
reply to post by predator0187
 




Why is it always Nessie.
Can't Champie exist too?


Sure, also the ogopogo. All would be a similar species, if not the same.

I'll take proof from anywhere.

Pred...



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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Loch ness or nessie is in reality called a plesiosaur. A known creature.



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 09:37 PM
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Originally posted by gossipnancy
Loch ness or nessie is in reality called a plesiosaur. A known creature.


Sure, but is it still roaming around on the planet today? That's the true question.

Same with Bigfoot and Gigantopithicus, the ape lived before but is it living now.

Pred...



posted on Aug, 10 2011 @ 09:44 PM
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I would love to try a little Nessie filet. I'd save the head and the important parts for the crypto crowd, but not before I cut off some decent filets first!

And the squatch? Well, I have a gorilla hand ash tray that sits on my desk, it would go great with a bigfoot rug. Heck, might even match my elephant's foot wastebasket......



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 06:03 AM
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Originally posted by angelchemuel
Loch Ness is part of the Great Glenn supervolcano. Scientists from Plymouth university are currently studying the Lochs 'floor' with remote cameras, and have found that indeed there is some 'venting' going on down there producing warm water which in turn have allowed some tiny species of marine life to grow to the size of your fist. They have said that this could be 'food' for Nessie.

www.lochness.co.uk...


Trouble is that if they are able to find animals the size of my fist in Loch Ness then Im pretty sure Nessy would have a hard time hiding
I know people claim Nessy could hide in a cave or something but the lake has been very very well searched....



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 06:06 AM
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Originally posted by predator0187

Sure, also the ogopogo. All would be a similar species, if not the same.

I'll take proof from anywhere.


Mokele-mbembe is another one that I think is fairly credible...



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 09:13 AM
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My thoughts, entirely.

Sightings such as Bigfoot, Yeti, Nessie... I'm not saying they do exist but I'm certainly not ignoring the possibility of them existing.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by Versa
 



I know people claim Nessy could hide in a cave or something but the lake has been very very well searched....


That sounds like a reasonable statement, but in fact it is incorrect. Due to the sheer enormity of the expanse of water the 'lake', as you call it, has not, in fact, been 'very very well searched'.


Loch Ness Facts & Figures

Length: 23 miles (37km)
Width: 1 mile (1.6km ) at widest point.
Depth: 600 ft (182.8m) on average, 786 ft (239.5m) at deepest point
Surface area: 21.8 square miles (56.4 km²)
Volume: ca 1.8 cubic miles (7.4km³) of freshwater


Source


In any case, while the rest of the world debates the 'fors and againsts' in this age-long debate, the Scots themselves know full-well what the score is:


Feeding Nessie

Swimming and playing in Loch Ness makes Nessie very hungry. Sometimes tourists bring her tasty things to eat. Some of Nessie's favourite things are apples and other kinds of fruit and, of course, chocolate biscuits.





Link






edit on 11/8/11 by pause4thought because: fixed code



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by gossipnancy
Loch ness or nessie is in reality called a plesiosaur. A known creature.

I believe you're RIGHT and Look What They have Just Released The Plesiosaur.
I found this to be interesting, Of-Course I was taught these creatures Laid Eggs,,
I guess not.
Pregnant Fossil Confirms Live Birth in Ancient 'Sea Monster'
Read more: www.foxnews.com...


The unique 78-million-year-old fossils of an adult plesiosaur and its unborn baby may provide the first evidence that these ancient animals gave live births, according to scientists.


The 15.4-foot-long adult specimen is one of the giant, carnivorous, four-flippered reptiles that lived during the Mesozoic Era. Dr. F. Robin O’Keefe of Marshal University in Huntington, W. Va., and Dr. Luis Chiappe, director of the Natural History Museum’s Dinosaur Institute, have determined that the skeleton contained within the creature is an embryo -- including ribs, 20 vertebrae, shoulders, hips, and paddle bones.


Here it is!!!!!

Text"Scientists have long known that the bodies of plesiosaurs were not well suited to climbing onto land and laying eggs in a nest," O'Keefe said. "So the lack of evidence of live birth in plesiosaurs has been puzzling. This fossil documents live birth in plesiosaurs for the first time, and so finally resolves this mystery.


Here is another interesting little tid-bit.

Text“Many of the animals alive today that give birth to large, single young are social and have maternal care,” O’Keef continued. “We speculate that plesiosaurs may have exhibited similar behaviors, making their social lives more similar to those of modern dolphins than other reptiles."



So the way I see it,,, Nessie is Hiding Guarding her Young and being a good parent, Mr. Nessie is out hunting food and coming back to the cave or den with supper and telling jokes about the Two Legged Things.

I don't know, But I would like to believe.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by pause4thought
reply to post by Versa
 



I know people claim Nessy could hide in a cave or something but the lake has been very very well searched....


That sounds like a reasonable statement, but in fact it is incorrect. Due to the sheer enormity of the expanse of water the 'lake', as you call it, has not, in fact, been 'very very well searched'.


Loch Ness Facts & Figures

Length: 23 miles (37km)
Width: 1 mile (1.6km ) at widest point.
Depth: 600 ft (182.8m) on average, 786 ft (239.5m) at deepest point
Surface area: 21.8 square miles (56.4 km²)
Volume: ca 1.8 cubic miles (7.4km³) of freshwater


Source


In any case, while the rest of the world debates the 'fors and againsts' in this age-long debate, the Scots themselves know full-well what the score is:


Feeding Nessie

Swimming and playing in Loch Ness makes Nessie very hungry. Sometimes tourists bring her tasty things to eat. Some of Nessie's favourite things are apples and other kinds of fruit and, of course, chocolate biscuits.





Link




Really? The locals are feeding nessie apples???? Im surprised they havent got a decent photograph yet then if shes so tame.

Posting the dimensions of the Loch really doenst mean anything. Teams have scoured the loch with radar and found nothing.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 04:38 PM
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Originally posted by pause4thought
reply to post by Versa
 



I know people claim Nessy could hide in a cave or something but the lake has been very very well searched....


Posting the dimensions of the Loch really doenst mean anything. Teams have scoured the loch with radar and found nothing.


then them hiding in underwater caves makes even more sense now
edit on 11-8-2011 by Enter Ruin because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by Enter Ruin

then them hiding in underwater caves makes even more sense now
edit on 11-8-2011 by Enter Ruin because: (no reason given)


yes IF nessy knows exactly when to hide in caves


We arent actually talking about the ocean here, its a lake, a BIG lake but common sense says theres nothing that big hiding there......



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by Versa
 


Now just hooooold on a minute! You really ought not to assume you can so easily dismiss literally centuries of reports of anomalous sightings.



Really? The locals are feeding nessie apples???? Im surprised they havent got a decent photograph yet then if shes so tame.

'Course they haven't. Have you ever tried holding a camera in one hand while feeding a hungry animal with the other?


Posting the dimensions of the Loch really doenst mean anything.

On the contrary. An appreciation of the vastness of the loch is of enormous relevance: it is extremely difficult to survey. Again, a degree of caution is advisable, despite what you may have heard:





The case is not closed. There really is room for open-minded investigation.

And incidentally I saw a documentary many years ago relating to a sonar sweep of the loch attempted by numerous boats spread out across the lake. a) They never claimed to have achieved a perfect sweep of every nook and cranny and b) there were some mysterious readings at very great depth suggestive of something large that was changing position. However the quality of the images was insufficient to constitute any real breakthrough. (You could see shoals of fish as specks, and this 'something else' as a large mass, nothing else.)



We arent actually talking about the ocean here, its a lake, a BIG lake but common sense says theres nothing that big hiding there......

a) This is no ordinary lake, and saying it is not the ocean again fails to take into account the geography of Loch Ness. It lies on a fault line in the earth, illustrated below:





Loch Ness is in fact only one of a series of lochs that lie along the Great Glen Fault, shown in pink. If you look at a map it actually looks like the land above has been split off from that below, and this stretches from one side of the country to the other. We are not simply talking about some lake in the conventional sense of the word. Some have suggested caves may well link one loch to the next, thereby eventually giving access to the sea.

There is more to this issue than meets the eye.



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