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One major question about "comet" Elenin

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posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 09:26 AM
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I am on the fence about Elenin, I'd like to believe all of the experts that say it is going to be close but not have any effects on us, and of course coming to this website and other conspiracy websites saying that it is a brown dwarf and it is going to have substantial gravitational effects on our planet I can't dismiss as BS. The big question I have in either instance is why haven't I seen a single mention of it in the news whatsoever? Haley's comet comes by once in a lifetime for most of us and I remember it being all over the news and I actually got to see it, Elenin is more than just once in a lifetime. This "comet" only comes through here once every 3600 years which would seem a little more important to us considering nobody in recorded history has ever seen this. If it is not going to harm us then why not spread the word through MSM that we are going to have a major event in the sky that isn't going to occur for another 3600 years. If these so called experts from NASA and other areas of science are saying that it's no big deal then why not let the general public in on it, this one thought in my opinion sways me to believe that something bad is going to happen, I am not a fear monger I just looking at the big picture and it doesn't make sense...any thoughts?




posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by Wheelindiehl
 


Because it wont be that spectacular?


"We're talking about how a comet looks as it safely flies past us," said Yeomans. "Some cometary visitors arriving from beyond the planetary region – like Hale-Bopp in 1997 -- have really lit up the night sky where you can see them easily with the naked eye as they safely transit the inner-solar system. But Elenin is trending toward the other end of the spectrum. You'll probably need a good pair of binoculars, clear skies, and a dark, secluded location to see it even on its brightest night."
source

I can remember Hale-Bopp and it was something you never forget but most people wont even see Elenin.
edit on 9/8/11 by Versa because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by Versa
 


I understand that, but it only comes throug here every 3600 years, at least tell the public to watch if they can see it! why not?



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 09:44 AM
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Originally posted by Wheelindiehl
reply to post by Versa
 


I understand that, but it only comes throug here every 3600 years, at least tell the public to watch if they can see it! why not?


because there are so many comets maybe? they'd be very busy if they reported each one...


As of January 2011 there are a reported 4,185 known comets
source

Im just guessing.
edit on 9/8/11 by Versa because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by Wheelindiehl
 


Oh, I'm glad you asked this question.

I've questioned the same thing myself. Although I try to stay away from the Elenin posts because they're all the same, two groups of people on each side of the fence being rude to each other. But anyway, I don't believe much that I read but I like to believe in the possibility of the impossible
I hope you get some educated and well thought out responses here. Good luck!



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by Versa
 


that's what I was going to say next, how many are there that pass through that we / I don't even know about?



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 09:49 AM
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I have had a question for a while concerning this comet, and that's why it's not being shown on spaceweather.com as an incoming object, or does that site only track near earth asteroids, not comets as well. From watching the JPL tracking of ELEnin it is assumed larger than some of the objects tracked, and upon closest approach, will be closer than some of the objects listed. Can someone throw me some insight???



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 09:49 AM
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reply to post by Wheelindiehl
 


Because anyone who is able to view Elenin as it passes will already know of its approach, they don't need the media to tell them its coming. Who does the media speak to? People like us - average people. Remember, the media is all about ratings. The average person couldn't care less about a random insignificant dot in the sky...so neither does the media.



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by SaneThinking
 


Spaceweather.com tracks near-Earth asteroids. The list does not include near-Earth comets, of which there are 90 currently known (source - at the bottom of the page).
To find Elenin, the list must be of near-Earth objects, not specifically of near-Earth asteroids.
Though, I'm sure Spaceweather.com will feature Elenin as it passes.
edit on 9-8-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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Everyone seen the news about Elenin's tail?

spaceobs.org...

...It's poison and HUGE.

And the NASA link says it's "kinda wimpy", but the other one, and other sites, keep changing and updating its stats. Didn't we just DOUBLE the size of the "tail"?

...I guess I just really want to see it.
edit on 9-8-2011 by Paote because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 10:19 AM
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Originally posted by Wheelindiehl
This "comet" only comes through here once every 3600 years which would seem a little more important to us considering nobody in recorded history has ever seen this.

That is not the comet's orbital period, though it is quite long. There are many other long period comets in the sky at any given time. At the moment, comet C/2009 P1 Garrad is a far better target than Elenin, yet it too has received no news because, like Elenin, it requires a telescope to view.

If these so called experts from NASA and other areas of science are saying that it's no big deal then why not let the general public in on it,

They did.
www.nasa.gov...
In return, many conspiracy theorists claimed that the above just proves they're "covering it up." Just look at the first comment down at the bottom. They can't win, NASA will always be accused of "covering something up" no matter what they do. If the address the issue to put it to bed, it's evidence of a cover-up. If they ignore the conspiracy theorists, it's evidence of a cover-up.


this one thought in my opinion sways me to believe that something bad is going to happen

Nothing bad is going to happen. Asteroid 1999 RQ176 wouldn't still be "with us" if Elenin were a brown dwarf. Instead, Elenin failed to detectably perturb it. That's only possible if Elenin is a low mass object.
edit on 9-8-2011 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 10:24 AM
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Thank you, but puting it on NASA.ov isn't what I was referring to...MSM, local news, CNN ???



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by Wheelindiehl
 


Prime already answered that. Nobody cares about an object that they won't even be able to see, and many of those that do, have some highly ill-conceived notions about it and those are the only reasons why they care. The ones that care for actual legitimate reasons, are already well aware and need no informing from the media. (nor would they watch it anyway)

So for the media to cover one of thousands of objects, and such a highly insignificant one at that, just because some scaremongerers won't give up on it, would just lend credence to their claims and cause more of the ignorant masses to flock into doing stupid things.

You can't stop people from being stupid, but you don't have to encourage or humor them.
edit on 9-8-2011 by Dashdragon because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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Originally posted by Wheelindiehl
Thank you, but puting it on NASA.ov isn't what I was referring to...MSM, local news, CNN ???

No offense, but I thought you just asked for NASA's experts to let the public in on it if it's no big deal? NASA doesn't control what the press decides to publish, though I have seen stories in the media about Elenin.
www.foxnews.com...



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 01:19 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Aug. 1. 2011

Comet Garradd on Aug. 1. 2011 as seen from Australia.
Comet Garradd on Aug. 1. 2011 as seen from Australia. Credit: Peter Lake.

C/2009 P1
M3 & Comet Garradd
This image from the WISE mission was taken on January 2nd, 2010, during the check-out phase, before the start of the WISE survey. It is a mosaic of 3 individual WISE frames spanning an area on the sky about 7 times the size of the full Moon in portions of the constellations Bootes and Canes Venatici.
In the lower right portion of the image there is a streak of orange light. This is most likely a human-made satellite, orbiting Earth at a higher altitude than the WISE telescope, which is at 523 km above the surface. WISE sees many of these as it scans the sky.
Just above the satellite in the image is Comet C/2008 Q3 (Garradd). Comets are balls of dust and ice left over from the formation of the Solar System. As a comet approaches the Sun it is heated and releases gas and dust from its surface that is blown back by the solar wind into a long, spectacular tail. This comet was discovered in August 2008 by Gordon Garradd of the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia. This comet probably comes from the Oort Cloud, a vast collection of remnants from the formation of the Solar System thought to surround it. At the time the comet was observed by WISE, in the constellation Bootes, it was a distance of 419 million kilometers (2.789 Astronomical Units, AU) from Earth. But we are just catching it while it is near the Sun. The orbit calculated for Comet C/2008 Q3 (Garradd) is inclined to the plane of the Solar System by nearly 140 degrees and takes it very far from the Sun (trillions of kilometers). It made its closest approach to the Sun in June of 2009 at a distance of 1.8 AU (270 million km), just outside the orbit of Mars. If it comes back near the Sun at all, it won't be for hundreds of thousands of years.
In the upper left of the image is the impressive globular cluster Messier 3 (M3). M3 was discovered in the constellation Canes Venatici by famous French Astronomer, Charles Messier in 1764, and first seen to be made of stars around 1784 by the British astronomer who discovered infrared light, William Herschel. Globular clusters are huge globs of stars (hence the name) that are found orbiting in the outer reaches of most galaxies. They are thought to form around the same time that a galaxy forms. The Milky Way has over 200 known globular clusters. M3 is one of the largest and brightest globular clusters around the Milky Way. It is just barely visible to the naked eye from a dark location. M3 is made of about half a million stars, thought to be about 8 billion years old. It is about 150 light-years across (1 light-year is equal to 9.46 trillion km) and located some 34,000 light-years from Earth.
WISE sees invisible infrared light, and the colors here are mapped to 3 of the 4 wavelength bands observed by WISE. Blue represents light with a wavelength of 3.4 microns, cyan maps to 4.6 microns and red is lightat 12 microns (a micron is 1 millionth of a meter, and visible light runs from 0.4-0.7 microns). The light from relatively hot objects, like stars in M3, is seen in blue and cyan. Red color represents cooler things, like dust from the comet and its tail. When this image was taken the WISE team was still calibrating the rate of the scan mirror with the motion of the WISE telescope. The rate was not yet perfected and careful examination of this image reveals some stars that are a little smeared and not exactly aligned in the blue/cyan with the red.
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The mission's principal investigator, Edward Wright, is at UCLA. The mission was competitively selected under NASA's Explorers Program managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The science instrument was built by the Space Dynamics Laboratory, Logan, Utah, and the spacecraft was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. Science operations and data processing take place at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Caltech manages JPL for NASA.
More information is online at www.nasa.gov... and wise.astro.ucla.edu....
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posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 01:21 PM
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Comet Elenin doesn't return to the inner Solar System every 3600 years. In fact, it has NEVER been to the planetary region of the Solar System prior to 2011. The original orbital elements indicate that it is a new arrival from the Oort Cloud (where it was presumably perturbed by a passing star or cloud of gas hundreds of thousands of years ago). Perturbations by Saturn (in December 2008) and Jupiter (in December 2012) will reduce the orbital period to approximately 11900 years.

C/2010 X1 Elenin is a normal comet. It is not Nibiru, it is not Planet X, and it most certainly is not a brown dwarf.



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 


A google news search reveals 13 results for "comet elenin" and 2 results for "comet garradd." You get similar numbers when you search without quotes for those two. I hope you see the point I'm making here.



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by Paote
 

fine summation from nasa eh? looks kind of wimpy. i'm glad they get lots of money to present these ..studies.



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