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Baboons Make Pets Of Feral Dogs

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posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by Titen-Sxull
 


Best Dr Zaius voice *Apes did not evolve from men...sacrilege*

It makes you wonder though just what is in that small % difference in DNA that gives us the edge over our relative species?




posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:17 PM
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Originally posted by goldentorch
reply to post by Aeons
 


Hard to tell on the domestication if they hadn't been from doesticated stock. I've known hunting dogs kept away from any contact with domestication per se. Although I accept in being trained for hunting they are to an extent domesticated but they are still just on the edge of civilized. I also knew a farm where feral cats were kept and I don't think the Baboons would have had much success with them I know I for one gave them a wide berth.



Domestic dogs gone feral have become a different species than their original wild counterparts. They can be feral, but they are still a domesticated dog.

Domesticated animals are different than their original wild counterparts due to thousands of years of selection. Being feral doesn't negate that they've undergone intense selection pressure to select for useful traits and a tendency to be pliable.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by Aeons
 


Of course, I was looking at it a little more shortsighted than that. Yes of course it doesn't I feel what's thrown me is the difference I noted with personal experiences, not looking at the larger picture. Good point.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by goldentorch
reply to post by Aeons
 


Of course, I was looking at it a little more shortsighted than that. Yes of course it doesn't I feel what's thrown me is the difference I noted with personal experiences, not looking at the larger picture. Good point.



Domestic pigs gone feral are damn nasty. So I understand.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by NowanKenubi
 


A higher level of control over their environment. That seems somehow a little unnerving



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 08:30 PM
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reply to post by Aeons
 


But so damn tasty. If they don't get you first.




posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:29 PM
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reply to post by goldentorch
 


Maybe it is the beginning of "The Planet of the Baboons."


But actually, we are not the only specie controlling its environment. In fact, many specie do like us; build with cement, farming, war ( even chemical ), take slaves, use tools, etc.

So all in all, I find it more unnerving when WE try to control the environment because we don't know where to draw the line in our actions. We always seem to go for "it all"...



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 07:38 AM
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Originally posted by lonewolf19792000
reply to post by CaptainInstaban
 


Yes we are primates. Were at the top of the primate chain. Our DNA is so closely related to chimpanzees that we can cross transfuse chimpanzee and human blood with both subjects surviving and thriving. Theres only a 1.3% genetic difference between us and them. You can even teach chimpanzees sign language and they know what theyre asking for and they can understand us. I used to "talk" to a chimp i worked with while i was studying anthropology in college and he knew how to ask for bananas and his toys, and he would sign hello to me i would show up for the afternoon. You stare into a chimps eyes you can see intelligence there, they ARE sentient.


Wow, I´m not totally retarded you know, I made a mistalke based on a semantics error, and I rectified it, and apologised for it a few posts later on the first page.

You don´t have to talk to me like I´m a child.


edit on 12-8-2011 by CaptainInstaban because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 08:50 AM
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reply to post by NowanKenubi
 


They also build cities, this I think is amazing.




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 09:21 AM
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I also found the wasp species I hinted at in an earlier reply.


Spiders spend a lot of time crafting their webs in hopes of making a meal out of all manner of winged insect--but a recently discovered species of wasp is found to use the spider's engineering prowess to its own advantage. Through a not yet understood chemical process, the wasps are able to, quite literally, enslave the unsuspecting spiders to build a nest for their larva, and after all that hard work, become their first meal. Sure, it seems pretty dastardly, but researchers say it's evolution. According to a study published by a Brazilian team in the Journal of Natural History, and reported by Correio Braziliense, the newly discovered wasp species, a member of the Hymenoptera family, is able to control some spiders through a chemical process that remains a mystery.



How the Wasp Enslaves the Spider A female wasp will target a spider and immobilize it with an unknown venom injected into its mouth--at which point the wasp lays its eggs on the spider's abdomen. When the spider revives, it seems to carry on unaffected as the wasp larvae develop. Over the course of several days, as the larvae grow riding on the spider's body, they releases a chemical that changes the behavior of its host. Instead of its normally orderly web-pattern construction, the spider begins to build a special cocoon for the larvae--controlled by the mysterious substance they emit


article

Also the ultimate microcosm of our own political system. This perhaps demonstrably links these behaviour patterns we are looking at as evolution as the enslaving ants Polyergus have become so specialised at war they are unable to take on the tasks necassary to tend to their needs so enslave the species Formica. They have not control of their environment enough to breed them so go on slaving raids for the larvea of the Formica.




posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 09:29 AM
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This one is artificial but quite amusing and amazing in it's own way. What we don't need is Lions with bloodhounds to help track us down





posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by goldentorch
 


Your last posts were incredible!


I didn't know about the wasp. And the dog with the lions made me think of a video that was posted here, I think, about a leopard killing a monkey and then noticing it had a baby. It left the corpse and did its best to protect the little monkey, even against hyenas, if I remember well.

I tend to think that we are wrong in thinking that humans are real inventors. I think the ancients saw what some species did, and applied it to human society. As proof; we still look at nature's way to solve a problem and try to mimic it in our own technologies. To some extent of course.

Are humans the best imitators of the planet? I wonder...



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by NowanKenubi
 


Think the title of best imitator goes to this chap. This truly blew my socks off.



Perhaps one thing these interspecies imitations would indicate is that at an even higher level we are an interdependent Earth a complete ecosystem and should be aware of it's fragilities as well as it's strengths.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


these are some wild creatures... i just saw this on bbc... www.bbc.co.uk...

does anyone know if there is a way to embed a video from bbc?

so they are symbiotic to beavers, but obviously not with each other...


edit on 7-9-2011 by schitzoandro because: add



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