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Alaskan Orange Goo is Unidentified Eggs!

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posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 01:46 AM
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I just sent this up to my friend who lives up there, hes a biologist, so maybe he has heard of it first hand and can shed some light on this. Its defiantly interesting.




posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 06:14 AM
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When I first read about the mysterious orange goo, I was thinking of nuclear bacteria... but microscopic nuclear eggs is close...

..I wonder what will hatch outta them...



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 06:33 AM
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Originally posted by kdog1982
Back in the day,I use to catch blue crabs on the east coast.
That is what made me think of crustacean eggs cause if we caught a female,we would have to release her.


heh... I'm from the gulf coast, and used to catch crabs as well. And like you, I thought those big blobs were eggs the crabs were carrying around.

They're not. Crab's eggs are a blackish grey, and don't bulge out - they're safely tucked under the "apron"

No... those big orange balls of mush? That... was a parasitic barnacle. Sacculina is the genus name. Basically this little critter finds a crab, bores a little hole into one of the soft joints, and injects itself. From there, the barnacle takes over - in the case of a male crab being infected, it is castrated and hormonal changes cause it to start developing female traits - a wider abdomen and even female mating cues. All infested crabs lose the ability to molt or grow new limbs; all those energy resources are hijacked by the parasite, wheich then uses hte crab's own reproductive structures to harbor and release its own offspring int othe open water, where htye will mate, and create more little crab invaders.




posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by Open2Truth
 


What eggs ARE poisonous????

More likely salmon eggs then. They are also an orange goo and more plentiful I imagine than lobsters. What I would like to know first...of course curious as to what these are but see no need to panic. If this were an episode of Star Trek and this happened it might raise some red flags but this is still Earth and subject to Earthy explanations and laws for the most part....what I would like to know however is what eggs have proved in the past ot be poisonous. I think this is a reserve possibility scientists use to justify destroying what they plan to destroy. It was dangerous to humans or the environment. Right. Since when do they really care?



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 08:23 AM
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reply to post by TheWalkingFox
 





No... those big orange balls of mush? That... was a parasitic barnacle. Sacculina is the genus name. Basically this little critter finds a crab, bores a little hole into one of the soft joints, and injects itself. From there, the barnacle takes over - in the case of a male crab being infected, it is castrated and hormonal changes cause it to start developing female traits - a wider abdomen and even female mating cues. All infested crabs lose the ability to molt or grow new limbs; all those energy resources are hijacked by the parasite, wheich then uses hte crab's own reproductive structures to harbor and release its own offspring int othe open water, where htye will mate, and create more little crab invaders



Holy Crap!

You are kidding right?

As above...so below comes to mind and if this is true....I don't have to tell you the possibilities this raises...I am getting a helmet. That's all I'm saying.



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by TheWalkingFox
 


not that I agree with the egg of a (?) theory... I would merely like to compliment you on that COOL INFO...

KUDOS to you sir... That is my 'learned something new today' science moment...
man this website has the smartest and most educated people Ive come across








posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by TheWalkingFox
 


it would suck to get castrated by a parasitic barnacle, I hope they havent found a new host in humans.

now who wants to go check Alaskan testicles, somebody has to keep this in hand and under observation




posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by Open2Truth
 


EGGS
Im going with aviation distributed or Gulf or Mexico oil eating microbes offspring. But if they were found in buckets or any other location outside of water I will stick with aviation distribution????



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 10:29 AM
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I think I'm more scared now with the absolutetly Z-Movie orange eggs from unidentified species than before with the regular orange substance.



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 11:18 AM
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Great info and ideas in many of the posts.

Just to update, NOAA has stated the goo is comprised of microscopic eggs of an unidentified species (probably an invertebrate). They have sent samples out for further testing. The goo turned powdery when dried. The goo was primarily on the surface of a lagoon and river, cut was also found in rain buckets and on a roof. The only volume estimate I could find was from a village resident who said that she could see "at least a thousand gallons" of the orange goop.

This occurred primarily in a Inupiat Eskimo village called Kivalina, although "orangey water" was reported as far as 150 miles away. The residents said they had never seen anything like it.

I agree that it might have been transported by the wind after drying, but I got the impression from the reports that the samples in the rain buckets were not dried out yet, but still gooey. Fascinating stuff.

I look forward to hearing more theories and ideas from ATS!



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 11:28 AM
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Clearly if these were a known egg of any sea creature they could immediately id them at first look under a scope.
The red rain in Indonesia was thought to have come from a comet, the cell were not like any on earth, I had e-mailed the scientist who was studying them at the time.



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by Open2Truth
 


I remember this stuff.

Red Weed!

Beware.

1:40




posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 11:58 AM
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I used to work for the local health department in environmental health. Which means that any question that no one can answer landed with us. I had a woman call who found clops of clear goo in her lawn. Yes it is as gross as it sounds. We believed in getting people answers if we could. So yes, your tax dollars are hard at work sometimes.
I did research, and I ended up calling cooperative extention. Apparently eggs showing up in weird places isn't all that uncommon, especially from amphibians and reptiles. But if your not a biologist with a specialty in reproduction, yes it is strange goop on the ground.

If it comes from a salamander or newt, not being a biologist myself, I believe that they might be able to climb. Or maybe some fascinated kids picked it up and flung it.

I never did find out what that woman had, she was also near an airport and strange things can fall from planes, including sewage. One word.......ew.

after looking at the vid, that looks like a mold or fungus to me. And they come in all sorts of pretty colors.


edit on 9-8-2011 by nixie_nox because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 12:00 PM
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Originally posted by DieBravely
I've read that in both Chernobyl and Fukushima's nuclear disasters, a yellow or orange fallout material was detected by residents. In both incidents, they were initially told it was nothing but harmless pollen from plantlife, but it was later verified to be radioactive material.

When I clicked that image, the orange material seems to be powder, not intact eggs.

I am not saying it COULDN'T be microscopic eggs as they say, however, I lean towards the idea that these so called "eggs" are just another "pollen" excuse.

If not from Fukushima and if not radioactive, I still believe this is some sort of chemical pollution created by a factory or industrial complex.
I believe you are incorrect. They would have looked at this stuff under a microscope and seen that it had an organic center like that of an egg, it would be hard to mistake. Eggs are just as worrying. This stuff has clearly entered the drinking water of certain households. What if it wasn't just washed in from sea but was deposited from the air to begin with, most of it went into the water but some may have blown with the wind in land. This has the potential to be some type of discrete biological attack.



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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Originally posted by defuntion
Many of the reports described the material (when dried) like a fine poweder or dust


This made me think of Brine Shrimp (Artemia Salina) eggs.

Their dried eggs are sold as fish food, which you have to hatch first.
The eggs look like fine golden to orange powder when dry. I would imagine you could make a goo, if you added a little water.

The dried eggs remain viable for up to two years, and hatch rapidly in proper environment (in less than 24h), but need salt water to do so. If you only mix the eggs with rain water, you probably wouldn't get much more than goo.


Interestingly, brine shrimp have been taken into space for experiments many times, so maybe someone on the space station flushed them down the toilet...

edit on 9/8/11 by deezee because: Correcting



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 12:31 PM
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It's official. I've been here too long. After reading the OP, the first word that popped into my head was "terraforming".

Somebody take me to the funny farm, where life is beautiful all the time, and I'll be happy to see those nice young men in their clean white coats...gotta be better than wondering if your planet is being terraformed.



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 12:48 PM
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are we going to allow them to hatch?
cant wait to see what comes out of them?
cant wait to eat it



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 01:27 PM
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Originally posted by deezee

Originally posted by defuntion
Many of the reports described the material (when dried) like a fine poweder or dust


This made me think of Brine Shrimp (Artemia Salina) eggs.

Their dried eggs are sold as fish food, which you have to hatch first.
The eggs look like fine golden to orange powder when dry. I would imagine you could make a goo, if you added a little water.

The dried eggs remain viable for up to two years, and hatch rapidly in proper environment (in less than 24h), but need salt water to do so. If you only mix the eggs with rain water, you probably wouldn't get much more than goo.


Interestingly, brine shrimp have been taken into space for experiments many times, so maybe someone on the space station flushed them down the toilet...

edit on 9/8/11 by deezee because: Correcting


Radioactive sea monkeys



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 02:00 PM
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There was a typhoon headed directly for China with another typhoon right behind it.

I think the Chinese Air Force released something in the upper atmosphere to block Alaska's HAARP.

Then China used it's own HAARP...the Typhoon headed towards them stopped off their coast..started spinning backwards...fell apart...reformed and then went due North towards Korea.

The typhoon behind it, turned around..and headed North-East...back out to the big Pacific where there's no possible hot water to feed it. No typhoon in the Pacific in recorded history ever did that.


I think the orange powder is from China. HAARP Blocker.



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 03:45 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


I am actually doing some research for an upcoming thread on the scientific theory of comets as biological carriers - fascinating stuff.




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