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Japan’s March 11 Earthquake Almost Shook Space

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posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 04:20 PM
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I personally thought this was an interesting article with pertinent information in it. I also didn't know this was even possible. So maybe some of our resident experts can expound some of the hows and whys of this phenomenon.


According to the atmosphere-vibrations study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, the vibrations from Japan quake and tsunami waves traveled towards upper atmosphere, the ionosphere, where they were amplified to thousands of times their original sizes, the National Geographic News reported.



The velocity and the magnitude of the atmospheric disturbance have not yet been revealed but March 11 earthquake and the following tsunami caused the biggest such phenomenon ever, researchers said.

Japan's March 11 Earthquake...

The article also mentions Sumatra. And insinuates this is a common occurrence after quakes. Especially large ones. But it doesn't really go into what effect this phenomena has on earth, or our atmosphere.

If these vibrations are amplified "thousands of times", then what effect does that have on weather patterns, volcanoes, other faults, and for that matter, life itself?

It seems to me this could be a piece of the puzzle that may help us understand the after effects of earthquakes that don't seem to always be connected directly.

Anyone else have some thoughts on this phenomenon?
edit on 8/8/2011 by Klassified because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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uhhhhhh clearly HAARP?



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 04:23 PM
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Umm, does this mean the ionosphere got warped, or more appropriately, haarped? Lol, wow, that's odd.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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ohhhhhhhh i seeeeee,

so haarp had nothing to do with what happened to the ionisphere.... hmmmm ok.......


i supose national geographic is always right on the money......



thanks tho op for bringing this artical it up



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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Although HAARP crossed my mind. If the article, or the researchers behind it are being truthful, then they're saying this is an after the fact phenomenon. Feedback? Or maybe reverberation?

ETA: I don't think we're looking at a haarp phenomenon on this one. This is vibration. Or as I said above, reverberation.
edit on 8/8/2011 by Klassified because: eta



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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Or they are just throwing an explanation of all those strange noises in the sky that come from nowhere. So, in the future they will just say, it was an earthquake that caused those noises. After all, most vibrations are an acoustic phenomena, are they not?

Does it say how they came to these concoctions, er, I mean conclusions?



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 

So what would it do besides interfere with some radio transmissions?

Ionospheric Physics of Radio Wave Propagation

While people are getting pummeled with a wall of water from the tsunami I doubt they're worried about the clarity of their radio signal.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


But this doesn't say radio wave propagation. This says "vibration". Any vibration amplified enough times is going to have an effect. And possibly a detrimental one.

If one sticks their head inside a bell and strikes the metal with a hammer, the effect is going to be quite noticeable.

So I think we're beyond radio interference on this one.

Thanks for the input Arbitrageur. Always good to see your posts.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by Klassified
But this doesn't say radio wave propagation. This says "vibration". Any vibration amplified enough times is going to have an effect. And possibly a detrimental one.
I understand that the article didn't mention radio waves. I brought them up because of my familiarity with the effect the ionosphere can have on the propagation of radio waves.

I was just trying to speculate on the significance of the vibrations. If you think it will have some effect other than interfering with radio transmissions, what effect do you think it will have, and what is your source? Obviously it can affect scientific instruments which measure the ionosphere but would there be any other effects anyone might notice? The article doesn't really say, in fact it's not very specific at all.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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Resonance.

Nikola Tesla talked a lot about that.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


It sounds to me like what they are saying, is the physical vibration caused from the earthquake sends sound waves up, and they become "amplified" many times over. And that the effect is like putting your hand in front of a large subwoofer multiplied exponentially.

So that energy must either bounce back to earth, or dissipate, or punch a hole and exit. If it bounces back, what effect does it have? If it dissipates in the atmosphere, what relevance does the research have? If it punches a hole, what does that mean to us?

Problem is, as you pointed out. They don't really tell us the significance of the scenario's. Which leaves me to question the overrall point of the research, and to figure out for myself what the effects of a large enough physical sound wave might be on the atmosphere, or on the earth.

And the answer may be that it's neglible unless you have several high magnitude quakes, or one super quake.


edit on 8/8/2011 by Klassified because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 08:19 PM
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Originally posted by Klassified
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


It sounds to me like what they are saying, is the physical vibration caused from the earthquake sends sound waves up, and they become "amplified" many times over. And that the effect is like putting your hand in front of a large subwoofer multiplied exponentially.

So that energy must either bounce back to earth, or dissipate, or punch a hole and exit. If it bounces back, what effect does it have? If it dissipates in the atmosphere, what relevance does the research have? If it punches a hole, what does that mean to us?

Problem is, as you pointed out. They don't really tell us the significance of the scenario's. Which leaves me to question the overrall point of the research, and to figure out for myself what the effects of a large enough physical sound wave might be on the atmosphere, or on the earth.

And the answer may be that it's neglible unless you have several high magnitude quakes, or one super quake.


edit on 8/8/2011 by Klassified because: (no reason given)


Na bro, its HAARP, its going from the ionosphere to the ground not the other way around.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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When you asked the question of "What effect could it have on life its self?" It made me wonder if these reverberation could be strong enough to interfere with some species inertial navigation system, or worse?

Im no expert on anything like this though, thats just the question I asked my self when I read those words from your post. Great post btw.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 

The word "amplified" is a bit misleading. The low frequency vibrations did not gain any energy as they reached the ionosphere. As the atmosphere gets thinner with altitude, the amplitude of the vibrations increases. The waves get "bigger" but they don't carry more power because of the lower density of the medium through which they travel.

As Arbitrageur said, there was a measurable effect on the ionosphere. It wiggled it. When the ionosphere wiggles it affects radio transmissions. These changes were detected by monitoring the signals from GPS satellites. The idea is that this might prove to be useful in tsunami warnings.

www.nature.com...



edit on 8/8/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks Phage. Hats off to you and Arbitrageur. That's closer to what I was looking for. And I agree, the word "amplified" is a bit misleading, and was throwing me off the more I thought about it.

My analogy using the subwoofer was part of my point there. Pressure from a subwoofer resonates, but doesn't amplify per se as it gets further away from its source. Which is why "Sound Pressure Level" is measured at one meter. So I couldn't figure out why vibratory pressure heading up would be "amplified". But what you're saying makes a hell of a lot more sense.

Maybe you should have written the article, and it would have made sense the first go round.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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Originally posted by ThePeopleParty
When you asked the question of "What effect could it have on life its self?" It made me wonder if these reverberation could be strong enough to interfere with some species inertial navigation system, or worse?

Im no expert on anything like this though, thats just the question I asked my self when I read those words from your post. Great post btw.


Interesting thought. And one I hadn't considered.



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