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Japan Tsunami Broke Huge Icebergs Off Antarctica!

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posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:41 PM
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Well this is very interesting!

The article says that the force from the tsunami was so powerful it broke off chucks that, together, are twice the size of the surface area of Manhattan! On top of that these icebergs have not budged in over 46 years!

They have found evidence of this before, recently with the earthquake in New Zealand but this was the first time they were actually able to connect the two....


To sum up the dynamics of the event: An earthquake off the coast of Japan caused massive waves to explode out from its epicenter. Swells of water swarmed toward an ice shelf in Antarctica, 8,000 miles (13,600 kilometers) away, and about 18 hours after the earthquake occurred, those waves broke off several chunks of ice that together equaled about two times the surface area of Manhattan. According to historical records, this particular piece of ice hadn't budged in at least 46 years before the tsunami came along.


Yahoo News

Makes me wonder, maybe someone can answer....what effect does this have on land? If huge icebergs miles and miles away can break apart from the sheer force of the waves so far away, can the same happen for land on a smaller scale? As an example, using japan, can the force effect Australia's land mass? What would happen in the future if this becomes more common, we have enough ice breaking off and melting as it is...




posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:42 PM
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wow thanks for posting.

Looking forward to finding additional web info soon!



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:43 PM
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as far as icebergs go, thats not so big...



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:44 PM
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Yes a land mass can crack and sink from a big quake.
As far as icebergs, the same effect happens as when ice melts in your glass, the levels do not change.


edit on 8-8-2011 by JibbyJedi because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by JibbyJedi
As far as icebergs, the same effect happens as when ice melts in your glass, the levels do not change.


edit on 8-8-2011 by JibbyJedi because: (no reason given)


doesn´t the ice that is ABOVE water level, make the water rise once it melts?

or am i that stupid?


ETA:

after watching the vid i'm still not convinced, the amount of ice that was above water was unsubstantial.

haha, time for a home experiment

edit on 8-8-2011 by kn0wh0w because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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Well it can make enourmous devastation on land



But i doubt it can cause earthquakes or make the earth tremble as such.
My guess is that the tsunamiwave got traped under the ice between ice and some "sunken island" or similar higher ground compared to surroundings.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:50 PM
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Originally posted by kn0wh0w


doesn´t the ice that is ABOVE water level, make the water rise once it melts?

or am i that stupid?


no the total weight is included in the displacement is Mr Wizard forgetting the ice caps on Greenland and Antarctica in this video?



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by JibbyJedi
 





As far as icebergs, the same effect happens as when ice melts in your glass, the levels do not change.


Why do I feel like I shouldve known that already
Video reminded me of a 3rd grade experiment..
Thank you for that though



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by iforget

Originally posted by kn0wh0w


doesn´t the ice that is ABOVE water level, make the water rise once it melts?

or am i that stupid?


no the total weight is included in the displacement is Mr Wizard forgetting the ice caps on Greenland and Antarctica in this video?


so it won't rise?

still don't quite get it.

sorry for my slowness today



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by Biigs
 


Looking for more info myself, I never thought a tsunami or earthquake can have that much effect on something thats so far away



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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Originally posted by WeBrooklyn
reply to post by JibbyJedi
 





As far as icebergs, the same effect happens as when ice melts in your glass, the levels do not change.


Why do I feel like I shouldve known that already
Video reminded me of a 3rd grade experiment..
Thank you for that though


but what if he stacked one more icecube on top?
imo it would overflow or am i really missing the point here ?



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by kn0wh0w
 





doesn´t the ice that is ABOVE water level, make the water rise once it melts? or am i that stupid? ETA: after watching the vid i'm still not convinced, the amount of ice that was above water was unsubstantial. haha, time for a home experiment


Great I'm confused again!!!


I think i'll ask my 10 year old but I'm sure thats a "well DUHHHH you didnt know that mom" moment.

Um, let us know the results of your home experiment



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by Mimir
 





Well it can make enourmous devastation on land YouTube Link But i doubt it can cause earthquakes or make the earth tremble as such. My guess is that the tsunamiwave got traped under the ice between ice and some "sunken island" or similar higher ground compared to surroundings.


That sounds plausible but the same as the wave getting "trapped", wouldnt that also be possible under an island, like a crack under land mass some distance away from where the waves originated from??



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by WeBrooklyn
reply to post by Mimir
 





Well it can make enourmous devastation on land YouTube Link But i doubt it can cause earthquakes or make the earth tremble as such. My guess is that the tsunamiwave got traped under the ice between ice and some "sunken island" or similar higher ground compared to surroundings.


That sounds plausible but the same as the wave getting "trapped", wouldnt that also be possible under an island, like a crack under land mass some distance away from where the waves originated from??


If the cavesystems was big enough yes. But its unlikely a island could stay above water on thin pillars of land/rock/stone.....Then again it might be able to brake of a big chunk of land if its a huge cavesystem.
Offcause this landmass wouldent float away like some new island but would crumble into the smashed cavesystem...maybe create a mudflood.
edit on 8-8-2011 by Mimir because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 02:05 PM
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Originally posted by WeBrooklyn
I never thought a tsunami or earthquake can have that much effect on something thats so far away


...thats a REALLY cute pup on your avatar...


...on topic - so, uh, the tsunami traveled 8000 miles at 444+mph?... can they sustain that speed for 18hours?... did i do the math right?...
...seems like, if this report is true, there wouldve been a lot of losses in shipping lanes that we wouldve heard about long before now...



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by kn0wh0w
 


as long as the ice is floating freely in the water and is not grounded it does not matter if some of it is above the sea level it will have displaced all the water it is going to. think about it like this does the water support the entire weight of a ship or just the portion below the water line

much of the ice on Greenland and Antarctica is not in the water and will indeed raise the sea level significantly if it should happen to make it into the ocean



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 02:11 PM
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Originally posted by iforget
reply to post by kn0wh0w
 


as long as the ice is floating freely in the water and is not grounded it does not matter if some of it is above the sea level it will have displaced all the water it is going to. think about it like this does the water support the entire weight of a ship or just the portion below the water line

much of the ice on Greenland and Antarctica is not in the water and will indeed raise the sea level significantly if it should happen to make it into the ocean


ok i'm starting to grasp it


but then the experiment of the glass and icecubes was flawed imho.
because the ice above water was unsubstantial and if he added one more cube it would've overflowed, don't you agree?



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by kn0wh0w
 


Yes you hit the nails head!

Thats the real problem about the poles + other places melting. Alot of this ice aint freeflowing but supported above current waterlevel, in some spots more than a kilometer high.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by kn0wh0w
 


the experiment was very flawed and misleading It is not the Sea Ice (depicted in the experiment) we have to worry about at this point

We have to worry that Glaciers especially those on Greenland may reach a tipping point and recede rapidly into the ocean that would be a major problem



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 02:24 PM
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reply to post by WeBrooklyn
 


Ice caps in antartica experience bigger waves on a dailly bases, waves bigger, and stronger than the tsunami from Japan could and would have ever caused . So therefore i beleive the story to be false in its assumptions.

Edit to add;
And for you that want to do a home experiment about water and ice and displacement , well,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, go get a plastic bottle, fill it to the very top with water, place the lid on and place it in the F$%#@^& freezer and freeze it...
See what happens then.
So when you see what happens.
So if anything , if the iceburgs that are in the water melt, the water level SHOULD stay constant or if anything DROP.
So please tell me im wrong in my thoughts.


edit on 8-8-2011 by meathed because: (no reason given)




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