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Want to Sue the FBI for Spying on Your Mosque? Sorry, That's Secret.

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posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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Want to Sue the FBI for Spying on Your Mosque? Sorry, That's Secret.


motherjones.com

The state secrets privilege—perhaps the most powerful weapon in the government's legal arsenal—has a complicated history. For years, Democrats, including then-Sen. Barack Obama, accused the Bush administration of overusing of the privilege, which allows the government to quash cases that involve national security before a court even hears evidence. Then, after Obama took office, his Justice Department used this get-out-of-court-free card repeatedly.

Last week, the DOJ invoked the state secrets privilege yet again. But this case, civil liberties groups say, is different.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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Honestly this is no surprise to me at all. I would feel save to say the United States government is spying on everyone, no matter what race, sex, religion they are, i feel that is a no brainer.

The reason i bring this to attention though is this spinet -
"Monteilh also claims that during his time as an informant, the FBI also involved him in an elaborate plan to present himself as a single, Muslim man seeking introductions to potential wives in Orange County and record his meetings with the women. Monteilh claims that before the relationships turned sexual, he approached the FBI agents on the case: "I said look guys, as you hear the recordings, if it goes to a level where there's a potential sexual encounter what do you want me to do?" According to Monteilh, the agents said to go ahead with the sexual interactions in cases where good information existed. After learning more about the women's potential "terrorist" connections abroad through Monteilh, the FBI would confront the women with recordings of their sexual encounters with Monteilh, intending to frighten them into giving the bureau actionable intelligence. "They told me that we're going to use the [Islamic] culture against the Muslim community," Monteilh says."

This quote just shows how the GE (global Elite) will use manipulation to shut people's mouth.

Thoughts?

motherjones.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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If the FBI wasn't spying on Mosques, I'd be outraged.

Let them do their job.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by Carseller4
 


It's FBI's job to spy on you too. If you have nothing to hide then why wont you allow them to put their cameras into your house?



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 10:09 AM
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If they're spying on people that belong to a mosque, they should be spying on everyone else in America.
I dont know why all of the attention are on Terrorist for the FBI....Just Saying, it dont make sense to me



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 10:34 AM
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reply to post by Carseller4
 


I don't think it's the spying of the mosque that's the real issue here but the violation of women's rights. This seems borderline to rape mixed in with blackmailing and spying on individuals during sexual encounters.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by Lostmymarbles
 


Yep that's the point i was trying to make.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by doom27
 


Forget the FBI, Channel4 already spied on your mosques. It's Channel4 you should be worried about, what they find will go on the television. What the F.B.I find often will remain secret.

LOL.
edit on 8-8-2011 by ExistentialNightmare because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by doom27
 


Useful analogy?:

I had a wife with paranoid schizophrenia. She was constantly worried that our house was bugged with listening devices. I tried to reason with her (should have known better). I gave up with reasoning and conceded that perhaps the listening devices really existed, and asked, "So what? I have nothing to hide... how about you?"

She had plenty to hide, and we both knew it.



posted on Aug, 8 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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I have a few issues with this, and I would like to offer discussion on them.

1) Why is using a religious weakness a crime? Though I disagree with the tactics, a legitimately sanctioned investigation should use all avenues available to them. If a women offers herself up sexually and an agent takes advantage of the situation to gian intel on a criminal operation that could save lives, it ultimately falls on the woman for making herself available. The bible, and the koran address temptation, and if someone is tested and fails, that is something they should take up with their god, not a court.

2) Why bother being secretive about their practices. Informing the population that this investigation is taking place, and the methods used, does not compromise it. In fact, telling the 'terrorists' if they really exist that you're keeping an eye on them is only beneficial as the reality of having to watch your every move, and look over your shoulder indefinately only increases your margin for error. Why can't we tell the 'terrorists' to be scared, because we are coming for them. To never sleep soundly or falter.

3) Why aren't we supporting a real investigation of the supposed enemies, when we are screaming for an investigation of our own letter agencies and government in general in it's complicity, or complacency. The fastest way to exposing the real men behind the curtain is to let them reveal themselves. Let these maniacs have what they desire to do their jobs, because when they come up empty handed there will be nowhere left to point the finger but at the mirror.

In the end, we are all responsible for the state of the union, and instead of pointing fingers at someone else, let us point it right back at ourselves.



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