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Police raid Mansfield, Ohio store, seizes diabolical bath salts

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posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 02:45 AM
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This is a ploy at the local level to make some money. Springfield Il recently passed city ordinances like a $300 fine for up to 2.6 grams of pot(no criminal charges.Like fishing without a license), a $500 city impound fee if your car if towed from an arrest to be payed to the city before your car is released by tow company. This doesn't include the usual $150+ tow and storage fee that adds $65 a day until you pick it up.
The list goes on.
www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com...
edi t on 7-8-2011 by Hillbilly123069 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 02:55 AM
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reply to post by Hillbilly123069
 


I just read the article to the link you posted. I must say Im stunned. The only bath salts Ive ever heard of are the lavender scented ones in my bathroom. Now they have artificial pot? I will never understand the drug culture.



posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 03:02 AM
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Originally posted by Hillbilly123069
Police raid Mansfield, Ohio store, seizes diabolical bath salts



To be clear to casual readers, we're not talking about anything you put in a bath.

We're talking here about
Mephedrone, also known as 4-methylmethcathinone (4-MMC), or 4-methylephedrone, is a synthetic stimulant and entactogen drug of the amphetamine and cathinone classes. Slang names include M4, meph,[5] drone,[6] and MCAT.[7] It is reportedly manufactured in China and is chemically similar to the cathinone compounds found in the khat plant of eastern Africa. It comes in the form of tablets or a powder, which users can swallow, snort or inject, producing similar effects to MDMA, amphetamines, and coc aine.

wiki

Because it is usually illegal, some dodgy traders such as the guy arrested in the linked article, call it "bath salts" in a stupid attempt to pretend it is not for human consumption.
Kinda like selling coc aine, but advertising it as "paint thickener".

edit on 7-8-2011 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 03:29 AM
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I read the article here and realized that the city of Mansfield has a problem. Their law isn't constitutional. Here's why. Those bath salts are still legal at the federal level. And the issue is this.

Article 1 sec. 8

To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and
with the Indian Tribes;

10th Amendment.

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor
prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to
the people.

The Power to regulate Interstate Commerce is a federally delegated power by Article 1 sec. 8. Until the Federal Government outlaws the bath salts in question the state of Ohio and the city of Mansfield would be in violation of the shopkeeper's Constitutional right to free interstate commerce.

Thought I would make a note of it.



posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 03:34 AM
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reply to post by Hillbilly123069
 


Yeah, but sadly this is the the world we grew into. There is no reason to treat drugs the way they do. I traded my parents/school for my big parents (government/employers).

It is "grown-up" time out of a sorts. It is a way to make us feel horrible and shamed just like are parents did when we were 3. Of course, the USA eats it all up and dramatizes everything, so it works. We are children nowadays.



posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 04:19 AM
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I've seen what these "bath salts" do to people. Stuff's almost killed a few of my friends. Seizures, heart problems, breathing problems, unstoppable hallucinations. I'm against prohibition personally, but these new designer drugs are just too much. They are dangerous, untested, and you never really know what your getting/smoking/snorting. I think the biggest problem I have is the way they're marketed to uninformed people. I don't know what the solution to this problem is. On one hand I don't want the govt telling anyone what they can and cannot put in their bodies. But the bath salt issue is just plain bad business. I don't think head shops ought to be selling the stuff, purposely mislabeling it as incense or bath salts.

On the other hand, if Home Depot sold booze they'd have to label it as a solvent. So, like I said, I don't know what the solution to this one is. Get it out of head shops and on the street where it belongs, call it what it is, and let it be sold like any other drug. Let people make an informed decision about their personal choice of poison I guess.



posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 04:36 AM
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Bath salts are not artificial pot, its artificial coc aine, north Carolina illegalize them earlier this year. The artificial pot was illegalize sometime in December 2010.

What's to understand about the drug culture other than opinion shouldn't be manipulated as fact. There are safe drugs out there, many of the non pharmaceutical illegal drugs are far more beneficial to several medical symptoms than anything a pharma corp sells you. Not only that but realistically speaking, the primary downside of many street drugs is legality, illegality which is pushed based on opinion. I'll name a few nontoxic, safe (if not abused) substances right now

THC
Psilosybin
Psilocin
'___'
The four above are all non addictive and physically cannot kill you, several effects mentally could cause depression and suicidal tendencies though these individuals tend to have these predispositions anyway.

here's a few toxic and potentially fatal sold by pharma corps

Zannex
Oxicontin
Morphine
Hydrocodon
Codein
The 5 above pharma drugs are commonly used and prescribed.
Alcohol
Nicotine
Both toxic and potentially fatal, oh, and addictive



posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 04:41 AM
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Originally posted by ZeroReady
I've seen what these "bath salts" do to people. Stuff's almost killed a few of my friends. Seizures, heart problems, breathing problems, unstoppable hallucinations. I'm against prohibition personally, but these new designer drugs are just too much. They are dangerous, untested, and you never really know what your getting/smoking/snorting. I think the biggest problem I have is the way they're marketed to uninformed people. I don't know what the solution to this problem is. On one hand I don't want the govt telling anyone what they can and cannot put in their bodies. But the bath salt issue is just plain bad business. I don't think head shops ought to be selling the stuff, purposely mislabeling it as incense or bath salts.

On the other hand, if Home Depot sold booze they'd have to label it as a solvent. So, like I said, I don't know what the solution to this one is. Get it out of head shops and on the street where it belongs, call it what it is, and let it be sold like any other drug. Let people make an informed decision about their personal choice of poison I guess.


Your friends don't research what they put in their bodies then, moderation is a word they may want to look up. Alcohol is a much more effective killer than these bath salts or the fake weed as is nicotine. If you don't know what your doing, don't do it, not everyone is a moron, and those that are, well, that's called evolution and survival of the fittest.



posted on Aug, 7 2011 @ 04:56 AM
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reply to post by DarkSarcasm
 


You're right. They didn't do the research. But I think it's because they felt that they didn't have to since the stuff was bought legally in a head shop and came wrapped up in a pretty package. If it was sold as what is really is, a drug, they may have thought twice before railing the stuff.



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