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Weidner: "At any time, the banks can kick down your door."

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posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 11:23 AM
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I love Matt Weidner's passion and his desire to fight the banksters.


His article (posted today) discusses his outrage about how American homeowners have lost their 4th Amendment Rights and can be robbed by the banks' "Jack Booted Thugs" after they kick down your door. When they're done, they'll kindly change your locks.


You see, Americans do not have the right to be safe and secure in their homes…AMERICANS DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO BE SECURE IN THEIR PERSONS, HOUSES, PAPERS AND EFFECTS….because at any moment, the banks can come and kick down your door. If they like, they can change your locks. And if you’ve got papers and valuables lying around, they may just help themselves to them.

And don’t think you can convince law enforcement to protect you….law enforcement will leave you alone. Helpless. Defenseless. While the Jack Booted Thugs Come Back Again and Again and Again.


When are Americans going to stand up and say enough is enough? Do we have to be living with all of our extended relatives before we realize that we're being stripped of all our property rights?

He goes on to explain:


[M]y client William Coyle claims happened to him:

Bill Coyle is on the verge of losing his home of 17 years to foreclosure, and that’s not the worst part.

The Lutz man claims between $200-300 hundred thousand dollars worth of automotive parts, tools, and equipment stored in his garage from his defunct Corvair restoration business have been removed from the now-vacant Vandervort Road home by an unidentified company working for his lender.


I know many won't agree with me, but it just seems as though this is just one piece of the design to destroy America from the ground up. There has been a quickening since 9/11. All of our rights to property and privacy are quickly fading. I wish I could see a way to reverse it, but I'm at a loss for ideas and the American people seem too complacent to engage in Revolution as Greece was brave enough to do and continues to do so.




posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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Pay your mortgage, and no problems. If this guy had $200,000 worth of stuff in his garage, he might have considered selling it to cover his debts. Sure, it sucks that the economy is down in many areas right now, but the economy does go through peaks and valleys. Bottom line - he should have sold the equipment to cover his mortgage.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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wish I had 200k of stuff laying around. But Seriously...was this guy living i a 500k - 1mil home? he should of been able to pay it off with his junk, unless he is a hoarder.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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Need a link to read the article, or it is just hear-say.

Side note, can the bank *prove* that they have the mortgage, or is it chopped and packed and sent to wall street?



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


Yes they can. The reason they can is that home ownership is a civil issue.
The government is not responsible to keep you in a home.

However that being said there are some squatter rights, adverse possession laws on the books.

I don't understand this guy.
If you borrow 100K and put the home up as collateral for the loan. Then it's your responsibility to pay that back.
Now I will agree that you should be able to negotiate things down the road and the bank should be flexible. Especially if you become upside down in the loan.

You always have the option of walking away.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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So, is anyone ready for the Plan yet?

If not, you will be...

With Love,

Your Brother



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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Sorry folks, I forgot to add the link and couldn't get online since they were repairing a transformer outside my house.

Here's the link:
mattweidnerlaw.com...



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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To those of you who are still blaming the homeowners, I encourage you to read this article:
www.huffingtonpost.com...
From the article:


"A receiver would have fired Countrywide's fraudulent senior leaders. Bank of America, by contrast, put them in leadership roles in major operations, including foreclosures, where they could commit continuing frauds." And Bank of America bragged at the time of having had more than 60 people doing "due diligence" on Countrywide before the acquisition. So they knew what they were getting into; or at least they should have known.


The dollar is falling. Houses are not valued at what the homeowner owes. The banks have lost/misplaced pertinent documents. They have not kept the wet ink documents they are required by law to have on hand in the event of a foreclosure or they appear in court. The banks have done way more wrong than people want to believe.

In my opinion, all home values need to be modified across the board whether or not the homeowner is behind. If you are one of those people who can still pay your mortgage, you are still being raped by the bank. You're just in a state of denial.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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Originally posted by Afterthought
To those of you who are still blaming the homeowners, I encourage you to read this article:
The dollar is falling. Houses are not valued at what the homeowner owes. The banks have lost/misplaced pertinent documents. They have not kept the wet ink documents they are required by law to have on hand in the event of a foreclosure or they appear in court. The banks have done way more wrong than people want to believe.

In my opinion, all home values need to be modified across the board whether or not the homeowner is behind. If you are one of those people who can still pay your mortgage, you are still being raped by the bank. You're just in a state of denial.


Look, I agree that some underhanded crap went down with predatory lending, but it is the responsibility of the homeowner to make a home purchase they can afford. Many people bought more than they could afford and accepted interest rates they should not have accepted. I certainly didn't purchase a giant, fancy home just because we qualified for it. I bought what we could reasonably afford to buy.

And I'm not being raped by any bank regarding my mortgage. It's a fixed rate, well within our budget to afford, and at a fair interest rate. Accepting my responsibilities to pay my debts and take care of my family to the best of my ability is not denial.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:09 PM
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reply to post by usernameconspiracy
 


I'm one of the victims who is getting screwed by the banks. I bought a house I could afford. I lost my job. I did the responsible thing by calling CONtrywide and asked for a three month deferment. They agreed. The stipulation was that I'd have to pay the two months I missed after three months and the third month I missed would be tacked onto the end of my loan. After the three months passed, I sent payment as agreed. It was electronically put back into my account a week later. When I called the bank to find out why they returned my money, they said that they don't do deferments. The catch here is that in that three months time, BOA took over my account from CONtrywide. They decided not to honor the agreement that had been set forth. They cannot legally do this. When a company purchases another company, they also purchase all debts and agreements. They are complete criminals. It makes me so angry that people actually believe that the majority of people getting kicked out of their homes because they bought more than they could afford. It's not always the way it is.

You say that you're not getting screwed by the bank. The only way you're not is if your home's value has remained the same since you purchased it or it has gained in value. If you fall into this category, I applaud your smart purchase. Many people who can still pay their mortgages do not fall into this category. They are stuck paying on a home that is 10-30% lower than they owe on their mortgage. If I'd have known in 2004 that I would be in this predicament, I'd have bought a $70,000 diamond instead. At least I'd have come out on top. My house is now valued at $56,800. My property is about a 1/3 of an acre and my house is concrete block. I'm 5 minutes from shopping and 5 minutes from the deep country and woods. It's an ideal location. It's just that the housing market is manipulated the same way the gas prices and stock market are. It's one huge shell game.
edit on 3-8-2011 by Afterthought because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:14 PM
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It's a risk to buy a house if your living that close to the edge. Losing your job, even for a long period, shouldn't put you in jeopardy. If you are then you weren't prepared for that investment.

Times turned and you got hit so really no one to blame but yourself unless there is criminal intents somewhere.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by kro32
 


I've always been employed and had no fear of not having an income. I guess you missed the part where I stated that I made good on my agreement to pay two months worth after the deferment period. How many people can't even do that?

It really sucks when the homeowner fulfills their end of the bargain, but the bank can't or refuses to hold up their end.
So, really - Who is the irresponsible party in this type of situation?
edit on 3-8-2011 by Afterthought because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:31 PM
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Originally posted by Afterthought
reply to post by kro32
 


I've always been employed and had no fear of not having an income. I guess you missed the part where I stated that I made good on my agreement to pay two months worth after the deferment period. How many people can't even do that?

It really sucks when the homeowner fulfills their end of the bargain, but the bank can't or refuses to hold up their end.
So, really - Who is the irresponsible party in this type of situation?
edit on 3-8-2011 by Afterthought because: (no reason given)


I wasn't addressing situations like that or your post directly so apoligies if it sounded that way. But for those people out of work for long periods I really don't think have prepared as well as they could have. I worked my butt off for a long time and sacrificed a lot so I could achieve financial responsiblity and I can easily take 6 months off with no income and still meet all my obligations because I prepared for it.

I've also never had a job that paid more than 30k a year either so my sympathy is hard to get except for situations where people were legitimately mistreated like you situation.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:42 PM
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The homeowner should take some responsibility in this. There is one fact that people seem to be missing anymore.... if you can not pay for it, you can not afford it.

With the amazing invention of "credit" people seem to think they can afford all kinds of things, when in reality they can not. If you have to take out a loan to buy something, you can not afford it. Homes are no different. Back in the 1920's, 1930's there was no such thing as a mortgage. People did not take loans out from banks to buy a home. They rented and saved, or they stayed with family and saved. Eventually, you save enough to buy a home and you pay it in full.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by kro32
 


Thanks, kro. I'm sorry I came across angry, but it's hard being on the defensive all the time. I hate the fact that some people view me as a deadbeat homeowner without knowing my story. I'm been fighting the bank though and they haven't won yet. I'm sure if they were doing everything by the book, they would've had me out by now. The fact is, I'd roast them in court and I believe they know this. I also believe that since my house was built in 1958 that they don't want it anyways. They have bigger fish to fry.

All one can do is do the best they can, live within their means, and prepare for the worst. I'm glad to hear that you have budgeted well and can maintain if you are without income. I'm just glad that I don't have any kids. I think this is where several people ended up where they are now and were unable to save. One of the biggest problems in America isn't that people have bought homes they couldn't afford, but that they've had children they couldn't afford. I know this may sound really mean, but it's the truth. It's always boggled my mind why people have kids when they're having trouble paying their bills.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by MrWendal
If you have to take out a loan to buy something, you can not afford it. Homes are no different. Back in the 1920's, 1930's there was no such thing as a mortgage. People did not take loans out from banks to buy a home. They rented and saved, or they stayed with family and saved. Eventually, you save enough to buy a home and you pay it in full.


First, allow me to address the fact that in the time period you specified up into the 1950s, one person worked in a household with 2.5 kids, were able to take family vacations each year, and still pay their mortgages off in the time alotted. Now, that's a thing of the past. Now, one or both spouses have to hold down two jobs, skip the vacations, and they still have trouble making ends meet.

When I moved to the state I now live in, I knew I wanted to purchase a house. I lived with my family for three years saving up and making sure my income was steady prior to even searching for a home. So, in your methodolgy, even though I've done everything properly and responsibly, I'm still not immune to economic hardships and being a victim of the banks.

What else can one do but never purchase anything again? That's my plan. Once I get this whole mess taken care of, I'd rather pay cash for a piece of land and build a yurt or similar design. Granted, I couldn't purchase one out right, but I'd rather put 50% down on one and be making payments to the yurt manufacturer than to the bank. At least the money is going to an actual business who is supplying a product instead of the banking entity who gives you nothing but monopoly money and fake dreams.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 08:36 PM
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Yes, there were some homeowners who bought more house than they could afford - some knowingly, some naively. In every one of those situations the banks had underwriting departments that should have been doing their job and making sure bad loans weren't being made. Let's not forget that they were simultaneously being allowed to write new bankruptcy legislation that would nail people with true hardship to the wall.

The big banks in this country own our government and judicial system. They've been caught dead to rights forging documents to foreclose on houses they had supposedly transferred to investors...houses they no longer had the right to foreclose on. I've SEEN the documents. The 50 states attorney generals were going after them quite aggressively with 2 women in Florida at the forefront. About a month ago, they were forced to resign and the government is now talking about negotiating a deal with the 5 largest lenders for a fine of 250 billion and it's business as usual.

These banks have foreclosed on homes that didn't even have mortgages on the or, the wrong house. The "modifications" they make with homeowners in a bad situation are a joke. I've known people personally who had lost a job and called to work out a modification. One in particular who was having to undergo chemotherapy tried.

First, trying to get through to someone takes forever... then they tell you that they can't work with you until your payments are behind. If, when you ARE delinquent, you first hope they don't tell you that they can't do anything for you because you're delinquent. IF you can finally persuade them to try and work with you, you have to hope that the left hand knows what the right hand is doing or the foreclosure may be in process while your making your modified payments. Then you have to hope that you're actually approved. It can take months while you continue making your modified payments and then they decide you don't qualify. What happens then is you get a letter telling you that the difference between what you've been paying and your original payment for however many months is now due; obviously this is not something a homeowner who is already in trouble can take care of.

The real kicker is that every modification a bank enters with a homeowner generates for them a fee from the government if it's done under HAMP... whether the modification works out, or not.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 08:50 PM
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Originally posted by usernameconspiracy
Pay your mortgage, and no problems. If this guy had $200,000 worth of stuff in his garage, he might have considered selling it to cover his debts. Sure, it sucks that the economy is down in many areas right now, but the economy does go through peaks and valleys. Bottom line - he should have sold the equipment to cover his mortgage.


The money the bank gave you to pay the mortgage was not theirs to begin with it was created through your promise to repay and by taking the value of that money from everyone elses money through inflation.
I'm so sick of people saying - just follow the rules, when you don't even understand the game.

Understand where the money comes from - then tell people they should just follow the rules these gangsters make up as they go along.


edit on 3-8-2011 by byteshertz because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 09:31 PM
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Originally posted by usernameconspiracy
Pay your mortgage, and no problems. If this guy had $200,000 worth of stuff in his garage, he might have considered selling it to cover his debts. Sure, it sucks that the economy is down in many areas right now, but the economy does go through peaks and valleys. Bottom line - he should have sold the equipment to cover his mortgage.


Peaks and valleys really? Come on.

Housing prices dropping 50% is more than a valley. That is a freakin' cliff, and very unprecedented.



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