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How the new 'Protecting Children' bill puts you at risk

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posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 11:40 PM
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How the new 'Protecting Children' bill puts you at risk


ct.zdnet.com

Last Thursday the U.S. House of Representatives’ judiciary committee passed a bill that makes the online activity of every American available to police and attorneys upon request under the guise of protecting children from pornography.

The Republican-majority sponsored bill is called the Protecting Children From Internet Pornographers Act of 2011.

It has nothing to do with pornography, and was opposed by over 30 civil liberties and consumer advocacy organizations, as well as one brave indie ISP that is urging its customers to do everything they can to protest the invasion of privacy.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
lifehacker.com




posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 11:40 PM
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well looks like when we were all worrying about the debt crisis the government found time to snoop on its own citizens more! like the article says has nothing to really do with porn it's most likely to monitor,harass and arrest people who stand up against this oppressive regime we call the united states government! i have a feeling i have been "looked into" im a president of my local labor union and have posted on here several times not to mention my constant searches online on anything that could be considered non-patriotic i just was audited by the irs and i always file short form! no extra deductions it took them two years to find out i owed them a whole 164 dollars! bet it cost them way more than that to find it lol

ct.zdnet.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 11:45 PM
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But if they use any evidence to convict or build a case against a person that is not porn related by seeing what they are doing, cant that be thrown out. Or would they be able to charge people using this for things other than child porn.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by thegoods724
 


well id say if you were involved in other "criminal" activities they may just know they needed to catch you in other ways id would be like you tipped the police off on yourself the fact they found out through your web logs would never come up in court



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 12:02 AM
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This seems very alarming at first. But when you think about it, ISPs are definitely keeping a record of our internet activities anyway. They make money selling that type of information to data mining companies who keep track of trends in people's browsing habits. If you don't think they are already doing this stuff, I've got bad news for ya.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by dave0davidson
 

just wait till the riaa and mpaa file class action lawsuits with the data legally available against all INTERNET users in the u.s and we all get our "bills" for all the "illegal" things we have listened to or viewed on line



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 12:34 AM
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reply to post by buddybaney
 


Destroying privacy on the Net makes us MORE vulnerable to predators, harassment and identity theft, NOT safer.

The basic rules for Internet Safety are being neutralized and destroyed by these laws and sites like Facebook - which demand that people post their personal information. Check out the Internet Safety rules on sites like the Michigan Department Of the Attorney General, internetsafetyrules.net and ivillage.com/10-rules-internet-safety-kids.




Never input your personal information online like real names, address, phone nos or anything that you can be identified with.

1. Never give out personal information on the Internet, such as their address, telephone number, the name or location of their school, or their parents' names.
2. ...never to post a home address, telephone number, or personal photograph
7.Choose a gender-neutral online name in a chat room to avoid harassment.




S&F&
btw.



edit on 3/8/11 by soficrow because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/8/11 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:11 AM
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ok maybe there is alot going on today in interweb "spying " privacy this up too !news.cnet.com...



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:13 AM
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Originally posted by buddybaney
reply to post by dave0davidson
 

just wait till the riaa and mpaa file class action lawsuits with the data legally available against all INTERNET users in the u.s and we all get our "bills" for all the "illegal" things we have listened to or viewed on line


They both should be the first target of child porn, given the music industry these days, and the glorification of children in movies.

They're pulling the strings however..



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:22 AM
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Another thing I took from this is the notion that "Of the people, for the people" has been completely lost here:




Because of the way the bill requires information to be collected and stored, the EFF called the bill “ripe for abuse by law enforcement officials” and said that because the laws designed to protect the private data of consumers from government access are insufficient and out-of-date, it creates “a perfect storm for government abuse.”



So they can't find the time or money to replace the old outdated laws protectinng your freedom, but there was plenty of both to put these new invasions of your privicy into place. That's handy.

It is this sort of behaviour which shows a government up as being out of touch and out of controll, as if we haven't had enough evidence of that recently!



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:26 AM
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Originally posted by dave0davidson
This seems very alarming at first. But when you think about it, ISPs are definitely keeping a record of our internet activities anyway.


No we're not.


They make money selling that type of information to data mining companies who keep track of trends in people's browsing habits.


No we don't.


If you don't think they are already doing this stuff, I've got bad news for ya.


As a person that works for a large ISP, and am in a position to be one of the first to know (meaning I would be the person instructed to put into place the data mining techniques) if we were "keeping a record" of our customers' activity, or collecting their data to sell, I have some disappointing news for you.


That doesn't mean some unscrupulous ISPs like Comcast aren't doing it, but most aren't.

/TOA



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:47 AM
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Currently its not isps that are recording your usage its the large corporate websites like wally world and Wachovia, maybe even ats. This information is used to cater advertising more specifically to you so ad revenue is not wasted trying to get a middle aged man who visits lowes.com to buy makeup.




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