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Frequent blood donor? Prepare to be tapped dry during emergencies!

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posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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WIth all the earthquakes, volcanos, tornados, and the ramping up of hurricane season, the FDA is proposing that frequent blood donors can be tapped within 48 hours of their last donation. I think this is a bit over zealous, but here's the article so you can read it and come to your own decision:
www.msnbc.msn.com...
From article:


Under proposals being considered by the Blood Products Advisory Committee, donors would be allowed to reduce the interval from the normal eight weeks down to four weeks without a doctor’s approval, and down to as little as 48 hours with a medical release.

And this...


Interestingly, the super donors might not be called upon in the most obvious disasters, which always attract hordes of well-meaning people willing to give blood. After the 9/11 terror attacks in New York, for instance, or the Hurricane Katrina aftermath in New Orleans, the response taxed the blood donation community’s capability to use and store it all.

Thank goodness that 9/11 and Katrina has brought this problem to our attention! (Sarcasm)
The last part of the second quote has me wondering though because it mentions storing the blood. If it's needed that urgently, why would storing it even be an issue?

Another concern of mine, aside from the donor's health, is the quality of the blood being produced. If only 48 hours has passed since the last donation, is the white blood cell count high enough to properly help the blood receiver?

I don't know that much about donating blood. I myself have never weighed enough to donate. Are there that few donors and healthy people out there that they need to tap 'super donors' so frequently in the event of an emergency? How can this effect the donor and how many 48 intervals can a donor handle without getting ill?

Are there any medical professionals or super donors who can elaborate on this?




posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:20 PM
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I donate blood, if reserves are low and someones life depends on a rapid donation I will happily give it.

Blood reserves can run low very quickly in a major disaster, a person with a major injury can lose far more than you donate very quickly and need it replacing quick sharp, it really can make the difference between life and death! It is true that rarer blood types do get more frequent reminders than most as these run out sooner.

I am not aware of the specifics of the minimum timescale between donations, but:

Share the wealth!



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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My mom/mum donates plasma, I know that's some part of the blood.
People are injured and some of us will be happy to share.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


Don't do it people.

They're gonna impair your circulation, lower the flow of blood to your brain, give you a heart arythmia and memory loss, or RBBB and then tell you you were born with it.

And when you try to tell them that you think it was because they took too much blood out, their gonna counter that your bone marrow grows it back and replaces it.

I'm a tell any medical professional who actually believes that your blood is gonna replace that full vial of blood that they just took out in a month or two is a fool.

I along with other people have been a victim of this insidious medical coupe to find away to get as many people's blood in blood banks.

Please look at these various articles by Health Ranger that make good points about the dangers of this stuff.

These are a few good articles.


Plasma donation holds a degree of misplaced benevolence

Learn more: www.naturalnews.com...

Plasma donation impairs blood circulation

www.naturalnews.com...

Plasma donation may result in premature natural death

www.naturalnews.com...



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:29 PM
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Just think what they have planned for poor organ donors.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by Pocky
 


Thanks for posting that information. I'll be sure to check it out so I can learn more about how donating blood affects the donor. Not to mention the frequency between donations.

I realize that people suffering from injuries and surgery mishaps need blood donations to survive and I tip my hat to those who can donate, but the whole 48 hour thing seems really bad to me. It just doesn't seem as though the body would have time to manufacture/replace the donor's body with quality blood before it's taken from their system again, then has to try to replace it again. This just seems very risky and dangerous.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:34 PM
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I have donated whole blood and many times,Plasma.What these do have in common is the employee could miss a vein.I've happen.Also people have different size veins making proper insertion more difficult.Does leave bruising and soreness.In answer I was donating(being paid)3 times per week with appoints every 2 days(48hrs)



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:38 PM
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reply to post by AgentX09
 


Where you donating in America or another country? How did you feel at the end of the week after donating three times?

edit on 2-8-2011 by Afterthought because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:45 PM
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The thing is, donating blood is voluntary. They can lower the time between donations, but that doesnt mean that anyone HAS to give.

You wont be 'tapped dry', unless you choose to.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:47 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
The thing is, donating blood is voluntary. They can lower the time between donations, but that doesnt mean that anyone HAS to give.

You wont be 'tapped dry', unless you choose to.
Excuse me, but have you been paying attention to the world lately?



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:48 PM
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Originally posted by sonofliberty1776

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
The thing is, donating blood is voluntary. They can lower the time between donations, but that doesnt mean that anyone HAS to give.

You wont be 'tapped dry', unless you choose to.
Excuse me, but have you been paying attention to the world lately?


Sure have. Can you show me where I missed americans being forced to donate blood?



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by Pocky
 


One woman -- no other information given -- died of "natural causes" at about half her "natural' lifespan.

Man -- stop the presses. That's some quality journalism there!



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


I've heard other people comment that after a couple of weeks they start noticing that they feel sick.

I know people who have air embolisms in their lungs and brain from this and memory loss, RBBB, heart arythmias, heart palpitations, no ear wax ever since they made hefty donations, brain atrophy, and chest pain.

Other people have died on the very same day that they gave their donations- the nurses didn't do thorough background medical checks on them beforehand and the donees went home pale and ended up dying.

I just hope that when people start experience the side-effects of too much blood loss, that they'll know that they are not alone. It's gonna cost them more to get better or even close to what they felt like before they ever donated their blood. -I say this from experience and from talking to other people who've experienced the same.


Death of Plasma Donor is Under Investigation.

www.deseretnews.com...



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:52 PM
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Im in US Midwest.And I was only mad when they missed a vein Then you would comeback in 2 days so that they can try the other arm!Do I think2 days to replace white cell count?No.I had lost job and did it to survive.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by Pocky
 


That's shady posting.

It's a 2003 article, so I googled her name. Guess what? Her autopsy showed that donating plasma didn't kill her.

findarticles.com...

Actual scientific studies of long term donors, contrasted with non-donor controls, and whole blood donors:

www.sciencedirect.com...

edit on 2-8-2011 by 0zzymand0s because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by AgentX09
 


Agent, you are one of the lucky ones. It's very interesting to me when I hear of cases where these adverse reactions aren't experienced. It makes me think maybe there are those whose blood does reproduce quickly, or maybe the ones who are experiencing the adverse reactions are experiencing an air embolism blockage or allergic reation.

I've had conversations with elderly people who are asked to donate a lot and they refuse.

My friend's grandmother died within like 3 months from when she started going in for regular blood withdrawals.

I've heard that they profit more than they pay the donees but this is a ton much more, if this snippet is correct.

www.naturalnews.com...


A donor gets paid about $100 for the amount for which the medical field profits $5,000.00. At the very least, donors should receive better compensation in return for this sacrifice. Regular donors should be given something more in return for donating their plasma then just a few dollars.


Learn more: www.naturalnews.com...






edit on 2-8-2011 by Pocky because: editing.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by sonofliberty1776

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
The thing is, donating blood is voluntary. They can lower the time between donations, but that doesnt mean that anyone HAS to give.

You wont be 'tapped dry', unless you choose to.
Excuse me, but have you been paying attention to the world lately?


Sure have. Can you show me where I missed americans being forced to donate blood?
Years ago I could fly on a plane and carry my tools as carry on luggage. Now I have to get felt up by some fat smelly SS agent or submit to a naked body scan. Years ago I could drive without the street nazis checking to see if I wore a seat belt. Years ago I could drive without being required to buy insurance. Years ago I could walk into a store and buy a gun by just showing my license to prove I was old enough. I could also buy ammunition with no id required. Years ago the very thought of a "national id card" would have brought riots in the streets and the idea of an implanted tracking device would have brought blood in the streets with politicians hanging from lampposts. Don't you realize that this is just a trial balloon and soon it will be expected and required for your blood type and donation history to be "on file" in case there is an emergency requiring your immediate participation.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by 0zzymand0s
 


That case stinks to me. I'm gonna say that it's possible that what they gave that girl was a venous air embolism caused by the air bubbles they inserted with the needle which creates the same kind of blockage that a blood clot does, except an air embolism is no hard mass, but the air bubbles that they've injected into the stream that are blocking the blood flow. I'm gonna say that to cover the medical establishments error they went with blood clot, but not iatrogenic air embolism. Of course, I'm speculating here on this, but future victims will pick it up from here. After all, it's very expensive to accurately diagnose an air embolism and you can't do it with a cardiogram.

So if anybody ever stumbles upon this thread and thinks about wasting their money on an EKG, I'm gonna tell you that that device is notorious for being unable to detect them most of the time. The most accurate machine is the SPECT, but that thing costs a ton and they have to inject that yucky substance to trace the blockage areas in the body.

It's cheaper to not get yourself into this trouble in the first place. But when worse comes to worst, get HBOT, and try to get a prescription for 100% HBOT, because that prescription dosage is capable of dismantling the air embolism, but not lower levels.


I wonder if air embolisms emulate blood clots so much that they don't even go into the specific of whether it was an air embolism over a tiny hard mass, how are they even capable of knowing that when they are dealing with small venous blockages?

Anyway, If anybody stumbles upon this article from donating blood or plasma, and is experiencing a drowning feeling, palpitations in the chest, brain, or cerebellum, and severe memory loss and pain then look into air embolism.

www.cirignani.com...











emedicine.medscape.com...



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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Well, coming back here and seeing the responses is quite eye opening. I never realized that donating blood was so controversial and possibly dangerous. I know that just from having tubes taken for testing has always left me tired and shaky, but I also don't weigh that much and suffer from anemia.

Given the frequency of donation, I still cannot believe that it is healthy even if people who have donated several times prior and are willing to donate again before the recommended six week time frame. If four weeks is considered pushing it, then 48 hours is dangerous in my opinion. At least it is still up to the donor's discretion and not mandatory. Yet.

Another part of the article that grabbed my attention was that the super donors would not be asked to donate during highly publicized tragedies since they usually get enough donors stepping up during these instances.

What kind of emergency could occur where the media wouldn't be all over it and super donors would be called in?

The only circumstances I can think of is in a martial law scenario and the people who normally line up to donate are told to stay home. Anyone else have any other ideas?



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:45 PM
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reply to post by Pocky
 


I suppose anything is possible.

I've sold plasma 30+ times in my life, and never experienced anything more then tiredness. I did develop an ear ache a few days after the last time I donated, but I chalked that up to the 2 hour swimming pool trip the night before.

Like I said -- anything is possible, but assuming blood or plasma donation is the culprit in a random illness or death is a little like assuming ATS posting is the cause of a plane crash.



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