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Are there 2 objects seen on NASA’s STEREO photo of Elenin?

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posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by Violater1
 


You post a sarcastic condescending attack and yet you didn't notice that only one object is in motion.

Or using a still is a purposeful attempt to deceive?
edit on 2-8-2011 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by Violater1
 


Did you check out that picture of Holmes? There's no trail in that one and it's a really close up shot compared to Elenin.

Here it is again.17P/Holmes



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:56 PM
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Yuh, with the 2 bugged out eyes, looks a little similar to this one star or bright white object in the sky that I have been taking pictures all week. Same place every night and it changes shape. check it out. Most recent one.




posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by Clisen33
 


I mentioned weeks ago that people shouldn't expect spectacular images from STEREO spacecrafts. The closest Elenin will be to STEREO B was July 31st, the day before they started imaging it so don't expect much better than this.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:57 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by Violater1
 


You post a sarcastic condescending attack and yet you didn't notice that only one object is in motion.

Or using a still is a purposeful attempt to deceive?
edit on 2-8-2011 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)


I'm not sure what you mean?
Next thing you'll be calling me a Govmt shill or CoIntel Pro

As I said at first, and later in my thread, it's more likely that Elenin is passing in front of something. But there is only a very brief .mpg to view. Nothing substantial
And yes, no tail..



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by Clisen33
reply to post by Violater1
 


I haven't checked out any other animations lately but are you saying that normally these comet animations have a trail indicator?


Yes, when you view this link of Holmes,
www.firstscience.com...
half way down the page you will see the JPL animation of Holmes with a tail. The JPL animation of Elenin is without a tail.
ssd.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:09 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by Clisen33
 


I mentioned weeks ago that people shouldn't expect spectacular images from STEREO spacecrafts. The closest Elenin will be to STEREO B was July 31st, the day before they started imaging it so don't expect much better than this.


At least we can see the fur ball fast walking across the sky.
I see your from Columbus OH, I'm over here at Wright-Patt AFB.
New to the area and all that. I'm not used to seeing any mountains



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by Violater1
 


dude, the jpl animation that you keep pointing at with a tail was created by someone else, they threw together an animated gif and used paint to spray the tail on there, probably as demonstration purposes.

JPL doesnt include tails in their orbit diagrams.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:38 PM
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Originally posted by IntegratedInstigator
reply to post by Violater1
 


dude, the jpl animation that you keep pointing at with a tail was created by someone else, they threw together an animated gif and used paint to spray the tail on there, probably as demonstration purposes.

JPL doesnt include tails in their orbit diagrams.


Thank you.
The JPL of Holmes is the first time I'd ever seen a tail in a JPL animation.
Clever how they hacked into the animation.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by Violater1
 


No problem, the animation isnt over 10 frames long. I dont think saying they 'hacked into the animation' would be terming it correctly. They probably set it to a date, took a screen capture, load it into paint, spraypaint the tail on there, and save it. Then go back and advance the comet by one day, screen capture...
manipulate the image...
save it...
advance the comet another day...
lather...
rinse...
repeat...

From my untrained eye, it looks like they only had to go through the steps 10 or so times, probably less (i didnt count the frames).

We all have to learn from somewhere! haha


ETA: I just went back to look at the date stamped in the corner, it seems to start around Nov 10 and end around Dec 1, so all they had to do was take a screen shot 20 or so times.

ALSO!!! Notice how the sun and the yellow lines keep jumping around everywhere. They move like that because whoever created this animation did not properly line up the screen captures each time they saved the painted image.
edit on 2-8-2011 by IntegratedInstigator because: See ETA



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by Violater1
 


What do you mean by mountains? Well welcome to Ohio, WPAFB huh. You'll see some of our equipment there. How much do you know about what went on there in 1947 to 50 or so.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by Violater1
 


What do you mean by mountains? Well welcome to Ohio, WPAFB huh. You'll see some of our equipment there. How much do you know about what went on there in 1947 to 50 or so.


Equipment? As in the Rand Corp?
Everything important is SCI, SAP, SCIF, and SAPF. I've received the full scope lifestyle but still, there are many, many things I don't know. Take for instance Dulce, NM. You can read my threads on these.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 07:49 PM
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On Oct 24th, Holmes lit up. In 24 hours it changed from an object as dim and tiny as the former planet Pluto – which can just be seen in perfect conditions with a good quality amateur telescope – to a fuzzy blob and growing over the next few days to become one-half the size of the full moon.




Even though Holmes is thought to be only 3.5 km in diameter, it’s spreading gasses are now thought to occupy a volume 300,000 km around the comet.



www.firstscience.com...



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by Violater1

Yo Phage, how close will this come to our Moon?


Phage isn't the only one who knows stuff.
Elenin's closest approach to Earth will be 0.2338 AU (34,980,000 km) from Earth. The Moon, at apogee, gets 0.0027 AU (405,410 km) from Earth. Even if the Moon was at apogee when Elenin passed and also just happened to be directly between the Earth and Elenin, the closest Elenin could ever get to the Moon would be 0.2311 AU (34,574,590 km). There is no danger of Elenin coming anywhere near the Moon.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by Violater1

Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by Violater1
 


What do you mean by mountains? Well welcome to Ohio, WPAFB huh. You'll see some of our equipment there. How much do you know about what went on there in 1947 to 50 or so.


Equipment? As in the Rand Corp?
Everything important is SCI, SAP, SCIF, and SAPF. I've received the full scope lifestyle but still, there are many, many things I don't know. Take for instance Dulce, NM. You can read my threads on these.


No, just a private company based in Columbus and we'll just leave that there. The mountains puzzles me.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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I can think of a few reasons why Elenin would appear to have no tail off the top of my head.

1. Perspective. If its tail is tail is fairly faint, and trailing away from the comet more or less directly behind the nucleus from our (or the STEREO spacecraft's) point of view, it could potentially be obscured by the coma, which tend to be quite large.

2. Distance. I don't know how far out Elenin is right now without checking its ephemeris, but it's not due for perihelion for almost 2 months. It may be far enough out that the interaction with the Sun hasn't caused enough outgassing to generate a tail yet.

3. Depletion. It could be a comet without enough ice and gasses left to generate a tail.

4. (the most likely explanation) First-timer. If this is an Oort Cloud comet making its first appearance in the inner solar system, it's not expected to be very showy. I believe the explanation for this is that it hasn't had any trips past the sun to begin sublimating its volatiles, which basically means its too "tight packed" still to release gas and dust into space.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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Now can anybody say for certain that we will be able to see this cleary in the night sky? I have read that it will only be able to be seen with a telescope?



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:14 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic

Originally posted by Violater1

Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by Violater1
 


What do you mean by mountains? Well welcome to Ohio, WPAFB huh. You'll see some of our equipment there. How much do you know about what went on there in 1947 to 50 or so.


Equipment? As in the Rand Corp?
Everything important is SCI, SAP, SCIF, and SAPF. I've received the full scope lifestyle but still, there are many, many things I don't know. Take for instance Dulce, NM. You can read my threads on these.


No, just a private company based in Columbus and we'll just leave that there. The mountains puzzles me.


OK

Formally from Edwards AFB North Base



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by cnm1976
 


They aren't sure how much the nucleus and coma will flare up as it approaches perihelion, but as it stands now, they predict it will be about 6th magnitude. Pretty faint. Probably only visible from a dark rural area with the naked eye. Definitely visible by telescope or possibly binoculars though.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


Here's a table of Lunar Perigee and Apogee but I only see monthly data. With those distances one can get a pretty good calculation of where the moon is. ( I just had this bookmarked for some reason).



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