It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Britain's alcohol problem.

page: 15
23
<< 12  13  14    16 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 10:40 PM
link   


Marijuana is addictive and kills if overused, yet it is illegal.


CasiusIgnoranze,you got any proof for that claim? didnt think so.

If you had of said :

"Alcohol is addictive and kills if overused, yet it is legal
Smoking is addictive and kills if overused, yet it is legal
Marijuana isnt addictive and doesnt kill if overused, yet it is illegal"

I would of agreed with you...

I also noticed how you "disappeared" off of this thread after your claim about marijuana.
Maybe you didnt reply after your post of page 1 because you know its false,or you learnt the truth.

Either way,how about you research before you make claims.

Cheers
edit on 2-8-2011 by BillyBoBBizWorth because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:47 AM
link   
It is a known fact that:

British and Danish 13-15 year-olds top the OECD’s list of young people who have been drunk at least twice, according to a health survey of young teenagers in 24 OECD countries.

According to the Comparative Child Well-being survey, 31.6 percent of Danish youths in the age group have been drunk at least twice, putting Denmark in second place after Britain where 33 percent had been drunk at least twice.

The United States ranks lowest in this indicator at 11.9 percent.

Less smoke
While the two countries top the list on youth alcohol, they come in under average in the smoking list where 15 percent of 15 year-olds in both Denmark and Britain say they smoke at least once per week. Here, Austria tops the list with 27 percent of 15 year-olds saying they smoke at least once per week.

“No one country performs well on all indicators or dimensions of child well-being. Where indicators can be compared by sex, age and migrant status, boys often have worse outcomes than girls and non-native children have worse outcomes than native children. However girls’ health behaviours are sometimes worse, as they exercise less and smoke more than boys,” the OECD survey says.

Britain and Denmark top alcohol list

So sorry for party rocking



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:07 AM
link   
I think a lot of people are missing the point.

Until relatively recently the vast majority of drinking done in the UK was done in traditional type boozers.
Between the landlords and the police drunkenness and loutish behaviour were kept at manageable levels.

Large numbers of these types of pubs are shutting at alaming rates, around three a day I think, as a direct result of government and corporate policies.
This is having a dramatic effect on the UK's drinking habits with more and more people drinking various amounts at home, something which used to be reserved for special occassions.

The majority of remaining pubs are featureless and characterless chain owned pubs whose margins are smaller due to their number of outlets and their large buying power etc.

In addition, once over pub landlords were actively encouraged to be able to 'look after' themselves and sort their own trouble out.
I know from bitter personal experience that this is now frowned upon and the police are expected to be informed of and to deal with all potential trouble. (I actively ignored their 'advice' and sorted all trouble out myself, not that I had much, and I never had to call the police once - much to their chagrin, aNd this led to what can only be described as harassment from licensing officers, drug squad, serious crimes, blah blah blah - they do like their pubwatch group of grassing, weakling, arse-licking toads who pass as landlords these days - and their charts and graphs)

As a result a whole generation of people are growing up outside the influence of pub landlords and 'communal elders and peers' etc.

This is one social engineering exercise which has failed miserably and the UK is far worse a place thanks to these policy changes.
Bring back the traditional boozer and we'll see a change in attitudes - but it has to be done soon.
Of course we'll still have drink related illnesses and violence but not at todays levels.

And people will be a little bit happier.

But ufortunately TPTB don't want it to happen because then us dirty like oiks will meet with each other and actually talk about things, sometimes even about the mess TPTB have made of everything, what they are doing and possibly even about what we should do to them!
edit on 3/8/11 by Freeborn because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:15 AM
link   

Originally posted by kn0wh0w
believe me as i say, if you´re a heavy pot-smoker and you suddenly decide to quite.
you're going to some type of withdrawal and that is not only psychological.


Don't be offended when I say, "No, I won't believe you".

Let's just say, to be within the T&C's, that a "friend of a friend" has smoked since he was 16. At times, he has given up for many months at a time and not once has he had ANY physical or psychological withdrawl. The only thing this "friend" missed was the smell...He loves the smell...

Giving up tobacco, on the other hand, induces quite severe withdrawl, so it's not as if this "friend" is immune to such things.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:15 AM
link   
reply to post by Freeborn
 


Pubs were always the place for working class men/women to meet up and talk about social issues and politics. The fact pubs are now closing at an alarming rate means there is less opportunity for the working classes to get together and discuss the issues effecting their way of life.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:21 AM
link   
reply to post by Deebo
 


We are still allowed to own guns, but guns were never popular with the peoples outside of rural communities. It is a myth we're not allowed to own guns and besides, this is not a human right.

As for the defence thing, as long as you use reasonable force (ie; equal to the threat you are facing) then you will be fine. Many threads on here about such things have been people taking a step too far.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:25 AM
link   
reply to post by woodwardjnr
 


Pubs are used by all class's. In fact, more middle class people drink in pubs now and less working class because of money issues.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:33 AM
link   

Originally posted by Suspiria

Originally posted by michaelmcclen
reply to post by Suspiria
 


The LEGAL age is 16 in clubs and pubs when accompanied with an adult for a meal.

No honestly it's NOT.
Care to elaborate the particular places you are referring to? I'm sure the publican is looking forward to losing their license.
edit on 1-8-2011 by Suspiria because: (no reason given)


Yyyyyyyes it is....



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:39 AM
link   

Originally posted by jimbo999
Yes you do actually. I've lived over there - and I've seen the chaos and violence on a weekend night when the pubs all close. It's like some kind of drunken riot - with cops standing around just watching.


That's because the Police are here to keep the peace, not enforce the law. If keeping the peace means herding a crowd of drunk people towards a taxi rank, instead of shooting them in the face like your guys will, then I'll take that any day of the week.


Originally posted by jimbo999
Over here you'd have your ass thrown in jail if you tried that.


Goes to show just who is the "Police state" really, doesn't it. We get accused of it alot, but the evidence points to the other side of the Atlantic.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:42 AM
link   
reply to post by Trolloks
 




reply to post by woodwardjnr

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Pubs are used by all class's. In fact, more middle class people drink in pubs now and less working class because of money issues.


And that my friend is the point we are making.....Blair openly said he wanted to change the UK's pub culture - just why do you think Blair, Cameron et al are hell bent on doing this? - it's certainly not for any altruistic desire to look after our health or well being!



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 05:43 AM
link   
reply to post by Pericle
 


You'll probably find most of these teenagers are from broken homes or poor families and they have serious mental health problems and no one gives a damn. Welcome to the UK. There's been a complete break down in the family structure here in the UK over the last 30 years. Things have changed drastically and for the worst. People today have less empathy and respect for their families and neighbours than they did 30 years ago. Nobody trusts anyone anymore. When I was younger I knew everyone in my street and respected every adult I came into contact with, yet how many people today can say the same. Most people today have been living next to their neighbours for 10 years and don't have a clue who they are and that is truly sad.
The government and media are mostly to blame for creating an atmosphere of fear & mistrust. It's deliberate and it's called social engineering.

The Deliberate Destruction of Britain


Community? We don't know our neighbours

www.independent.co.uk...
news.bbc.co.uk...
www.politicalworld.org...



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 06:12 AM
link   
reply to post by kindred
 


I agree with the core message of the video you posted but there were quite a few parts of it I disagreed with, some quite strongly.....and that is why I would never align myself to one single political party or belief system, it's far too restrictive, and certainly never Nick Griffen and his BNP Party.

And whilst I see and understand the connection I think we may be straying somewhat from the thread topic.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 07:05 AM
link   
reply to post by Suspiria
 



And there in lies a problem. This is not for the likes of everyone..This is put in place for the ladeedaa affluent folks trotting down to their local for lunch after a spot of horse riding. Most publican's wouldn't touch this with a bargepole, too much trouble. And for a start if anyone merely got whiff of a parent giving a child under 10 a drink apart from supping the froth off grandmas stout at Christmas you'd have the SS banging your door down.


Your right, Class issues in the UK bare most of the responsibility why our laws and the way they are pushed/enforced by the establishment is so messed up. My sons school used to not only allow booze on school grounds but actively sold it to parents.. and as you can imagine on sports days they would rake in the cash from booze sales...

But, I will say that even tho this is not a rich area and I did take my son down the pub for meals and drinks (he is 18 now) and I've never had a problem buying him pints... (however it is nicer now that he can buy the odd pint for me
)

I guess that might be a local thing, as the council think tank wants to allow kids into the pubs in an attempt to combat under-age street drinking and I agree with them, the best way to deal with the problem is to teach responsible drinking..

edit on 3/8/11 by thoughtsfull because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 07:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by thoughtsfull
reply to post by Suspiria
 



And there in lies a problem. This is not for the likes of everyone..This is put in place for the ladeedaa affluent folks trotting down to their local for lunch after a spot of horse riding. Most publican's wouldn't touch this with a bargepole, too much trouble. And for a start if anyone merely got whiff of a parent giving a child under 10 a drink apart from supping the froth off grandmas stout at Christmas you'd have the SS banging your door down.


Your right, Class issues in the UK bare most of the responsibility why our laws and the way they are pushed/enforced by the establishment is so messed up. My sons school used to not only allow booze on school grounds but actively sold it to parents.. and as you can imagine on sports days they would rake in the cash from booze sales...

But, I will say that even tho this is not a rich area and I did take my son down the pub for meals and drinks (he is 18 now) and I've never had a problem buying him pints... (however it is nicer now that he can buy the odd pint for me
)

I guess that might be a local thing, as the council think tank wants to allow kids into the pubs in an attempt to combat under-age street drinking and I agree with them, the best way to deal with the problem is to teach responsible drinking..

edit on 3/8/11 by thoughtsfull because: (no reason given)


Good heavens. The closest you got to booze at my son's school was the bottle of cheap sherry at the school raffle.
And you are right, if children can grow up having a healthy respect for drink and what it can do we would have less problems, but when the majority of people don't realise their teens are allowed a drink or they do and are knocked back by publican's what can you do?



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 07:25 AM
link   
reply to post by Freeborn
 



As a result a whole generation of people are growing up outside the influence of pub landlords and 'communal elders and peers' etc.


This was what the Brighton council think tank was trying to push recently.. bringing in the young from the streets and encouraging a return of elder/peer pressure to deal with irresponsible drinking on street corners.. I have to agree that promoting responsible drinking is the best way forward.. but unsurprisingly the plan was opposed by the police..



Brighton considers allowing under-age drinking in pubs

A council is considering allowing children in pubs as a way of cutting anti-social behaviour and under-age drinking.

The idea is being reviewed by Brighton and Hove City Council as a way of tackling high numbers of teen drinkers who consume alcohol in the street.

A report by the council concluded youngsters will inevitably consume alcohol, bought from retailers or elsewhere, and preventing this is almost impossible.

So allowing them in pubs might be a better option and be easier to manage.

‘It might be preferable if this drinking took place in pubs rather than other objectively more risky environments,’ the report said.
Link

edit on 3/8/11 by thoughtsfull because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 07:40 AM
link   
reply to post by Suspiria
 



Good heavens. The closest you got to booze at my son's school was the bottle of cheap sherry at the school raffle. And you are right, if children can grow up having a healthy respect for drink and what it can do we would have less problems, but when the majority of people don't realise their teens are allowed a drink or they do and are knocked back by publican's what can you do?


I think we as a nation need a decent rethink but right now we are (in my opinion as a nation) too indoctrinated with the other ban ban ban type messages to find real honest workable and sensible solutions....

So unless we can find a way of mitigating the indoctrination of the last 30 years I have no idea where my town will be in 10 years given we really do have a real under-age drinking problem, and the only god around here is the god of booze..



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 08:05 AM
link   

Originally posted by The time lord
They could have tackled the drink proplem sooner but now the Polish have arrived, they don't drink either then...Not. So now we have fuel to the fire because they like drinking and guess what just in my town alone in last 3 years polish people have gone from pub to life in prison, we had that problem anyway in the past it just started again I guess if not worse and they don't understand that here in the UK people can be violent when drunk.

So just in case I am being racist what if 300,000 Scotish people arrived in your city, would there be a drink problem?

edit on 2-8-2011 by The time lord because: (no reason given)


Everyone should be treated and then get help, to be honest it is their friends and social pressure that does it and the coolness of being drunk, today there is no shame in it.
edit on 2-8-2011 by The time lord because: (no reason given)


To add to this I have to say this problem has been brought abroad, in Spain especially where the English have emigrated over the years and the nightclub life. A lot more drink related disorder has come to Spain, no doubt the Germans are big drinkers too but I know more about the English problem because they address it here in the media.

The drink craze has now hit Italy too, this brings a lot of problems like drink driving crashes and chaos in the streets and the acceptance of it being socially acceptable to be totally sick drunk.

The biggest problem is that teenagers start early and get drunk and it is cool for them when in fact it is a disaster waiting to happen, it is also the shops that sell them, sometimes older friends buy them for the teenagers and then they tell their friends and its all of a sudden socially acceptable when in fact it is a danger and illegal.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 08:42 AM
link   
reply to post by woodwardjnr
 


I wonder if it's the Imperial Pint (which I love)?

I'm in America but for a few years I worked at a British Pub on a beach in Florida. It may be cultural but the difference between a standard 20 ounce serving in Britain and the standard 12 ounce serving here is most noticeable when you think you have a 6 beer max but that could be anywhere from 60-100 ounces...

I know there's the option to have a "glass" or half pint but in 3 years I only saw women order it by the glass....



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 08:58 AM
link   

Originally posted by The time lord
The biggest problem is that teenagers start early and get drunk and it is cool for them when in fact it is a disaster waiting to happen, it is also the shops that sell them, sometimes older friends buy them for the teenagers and then they tell their friends and its all of a sudden socially acceptable when in fact it is a danger and illegal.


I can relate to this..

On more than one occasion, when going down to my local corner shop, I have been stopped by a group of young girls (reckon between 15-17 years old) asking me to buy them booze or tobacco. I've always refused and told them it isn't worth the fine I'll get, plus they should do something else with their time..

The shocking thing is, more than once, they've tried to pursuade me with offers of "sexual services" in return for buying them drink or fags. Now, I refused (despite them being quite nice looking ladies!) because firstly I don't know how old they are and could get into a load of trouble and secondly because it is just wrong. Then I thought, if they offered that too me, how many others do they offer it too and how many accept?



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 09:15 AM
link   
reply to post by thoughtsfull
 


The Police are supposed to be upholders of 'The Law'.
Some how they also now seem to be considered experts in policy and law making.
As a result they propose what is best for them as a policing body, which is sometimes at odds with what's best for society.

In light of recent revelations and personal experiences I don't think the police can be relied upon for much at present.



new topics

top topics



 
23
<< 12  13  14    16 >>

log in

join