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Egyptian Tomb Mystery: may be World's 1st Protractor (what do you think it is or for?)

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posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by anon72
It just seems a little odd that no other devices such as these have been discovered or known about.

They didn't just have 1 device and even if they did, they wouldn't bury it with someone.

Unless they didn't need the device anymore.

Or, they were common enough that one could be buried.

But then if they were used for pryamid building, with so many being built, we should have discovered others. Or seen them or read about them previously-one would think.

There is the possibility that it was a one-off made specifically for--whatsisname--Kha. Maybe it was like a retirement-gift/gold-watch sort of thing. Or maybe commissioned by the Pharaoh himself: "(Known) World's Best Architect" sort of thing....




posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by Ex_CT2
 


True, or it could also be something like a prototype of his own invention, which lends itself to explaining why it wasn't a common tool among the AE. The fact that it was decorated and buried with an architect (Kha) may mean it was more ceremonial than functional.

The hinged lid could also have held the other pieces of the instrument such as a string and weighted bob.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 
I had the same idea about it being a container for a plumb-bob, they likely had an air of the ceremonial and mysterious that was deliberately encouraged by the architects. Not much different to the modern masons or priesthood.

What puts me off that explanation are the numerical values on the object and the absence of a hole where a cord could have potentially suspended the plumb.

I guess we can't rule anything out and it's made all the more inconclusive if we accept the owner was an individual. He may well have had the object designed in accordance with values known only to him.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by anon72
 


I bet mainstream Archaeologists will argue that its a simple child's toy rather than the worlds first protractor!



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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One thing that came to mind that I havent seen mentioned yet is regarding the three holes at the top. One side has two, the other has just one. The singular one is in the center, the two on the other side are equally spaced from the center.

Now imagine you were to stick a small peg in each hole, or a stick or piece of reed. This set up reminds me very much of a dovetail sight on a modern rifle. Perhaps the string was hung from the center, and the object you were looking at was sighted down the 'barrel' of this piece. You may be able to measure the elevations of stars or other celestial objects?

Just my two cents.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 05:08 PM
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From what I remember they would put some live scarab in the device and close the holes with linen till the scarab had grown too large to escape.When the scarab would get angry enough to tip the device over to land on the other end a human sacrifice would be performed.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by CasiusIgnoranze
 


Guess you didn't read the article. They have been debating it for over a 100 years as to what it is.

I think they meant actual people who study this stuff.

I'll put it up again for you:


The bizarre object pictured here was found in the tomb of an ancient Egyptian architect. For over 100 years, it has languished while archaeologists debated its function.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 05:25 PM
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What if the object has absolutely nothing to do with the fact that he was an architect?
Everybody is pulling their teeth out trying to associate a oddly shaped unrelated decorative piece. Meanwhile it simply could be a decorative piece his wife or whomever picked up at the Saturday morning bazaar for a couple of pieces of silver.


Us Geniuses in the 21st century are going to figure it out alright



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 05:47 PM
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Interesting mystery object.... The first thing I thought of when I looked at it was that it looks like a musical instrument. Like a percussion instrument that one would hit with a mallet or sticks. It appears hollow, has holes, and regular markings (i.e., where to strike). I suppose if that is what it was, the debate would have been resolved by now.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by anon72
 

I think they are sun symbols,


There is a common astrological, and now astronomical, symbol for the Sun. It's a circle with a dot in it. This particular image was once the alchemical symbol for gold, being "...the most perfect of the metals. For the alchemist, it represented the perfection of all matter on any level, including that of the mind, spirit, and soul." The symbol's association with both gold and the Sun evidently dates back as far as alchemy does. The article Gold and the Sun mentions that aurum the latin word for gold, is derived from the Greek name Aurora, the goddess of the dawn. So the color of gold was associated with the brilliance of the Sun since ancient times. Another site, Alchemy and Symbols, notes that "Only a few metals were known to the alchemists. They were, namely, gold, silver, iron, mercury, tin, copper and lead. Since they knew only seven planets [sic - should be 6 planets plus the Sun] and seven gods, they named these seven metals after the gods of the planets. These metals then, were known as the "Seven Metals of the Ancients." Gold, the noble metal, was named after Sol, the golden Sun whose symbol was the perfect sphere;..." and later, "The seven metals were each assigned a day in the week; thus, Sunday was gold (Sol)...". One site notes that "A dot or point in the center of a circle symbolizes the blending of male and female forces. Hindus call the midpoint in a circle the bindu - the spark of (masculine) life within the cosmic womb. However, how that relates to the Sun is not explained.
solar-center.stanford. folklore. symbolism

I also think it’s used for surveying, and im also guessing it lines up stars in some way. And that is a sun wheel .
edit on 1/8/11 by Whateva69 because: oops



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 06:05 PM
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reply to post by davesmart
 


What's your avatar picture from ?

Second



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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And to me it’s not decorative at all, but rather rough in comparison to the Egyptian art. The sketching (symbols), in my opinion are not done by an artist but by someone who is not skilled in carving. The symbols have been put on there for a purpose by the user.

I would like know how many sun circles are on its top and sides, and does that number coincide with anything significant, like days, months ect.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 08:16 PM
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Man, so great thoughts on this.

I have to say that several have impressed me but I think the one I prefer and like the best....Kandinsky's

The posting that indicated it may have been used in Water-as the Egyptians used water for leveling etc.

I still think the small angle cut on the left side bottom (with a hole) is very important.
edit on 8/1/2011 by anon72 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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oh i agree. I think Kandinsky idea of a spirit level on the right track too.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by anon72
 


Well it's quit cool if so, though that's not exactly some amazing news or mystery. They were renown architects whom could trace the stars and use them as borderline lasers.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 


It's a mystery for over 100 years. I say a big deal... figuring it out. Which they haven't yet.

I don't know. What do you think it was and for again?



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 10:29 PM
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reply to post by anon72
 


Just like you said. Definable looks like a drafting tool for architectural mayhem.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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Maybe the thing is both a level and a protractor. I wouldn't put it past some really clever guy to figure out how to combine two or maybe even more architectural devices into one. The Egyptians certainly produced some exceedingly clever people in their long history, as evidenced by their art and architecture.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 12:48 AM
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Originally posted by IntegratedInstigator
One thing that came to mind that I havent seen mentioned yet is regarding the three holes at the top. One side has two, the other has just one. The singular one is in the center, the two on the other side are equally spaced from the center.

Now imagine you were to stick a small peg in each hole, or a stick or piece of reed. This set up reminds me very much of a dovetail sight on a modern rifle. Perhaps the string was hung from the center, and the object you were looking at was sighted down the 'barrel' of this piece. You may be able to measure the elevations of stars or other celestial objects?

Just my two cents.



Very close to my own idea. I saw the three holes as well, and imiedietly thought "sights". I then asked myself what kind of tool a modren day archietect uses that has sights, the answer was a transit AKA theodolite ( theodolite information )
The fact that it is hollow and resembles a case may be due to the need to carry the base and legs of the insturment around while surveying. The legs, base, and pegs used for sighting may have been stored inside while moving around the building sight or for storage.
edit on 2-8-2011 by mileysubet because: pfft...can't spell worth a darn



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 01:08 AM
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With a little more poking around I think I found another instrument that closely resembles the found artifact. The Dioptra The dioptra was replaced as a surveying instrument by the theodolite (as I found in my original post.). Even though the dioptra was mainly used for astronomical observations, I do not find it too far fetched to assure an architect would have this type of tool in his "tool box". After all many of the ruins found in Egypt are thought to be built aligned to major celestial objects. After searching a little bit I can not believe that people have been searching for an answer to the mystery of this object for 100 years. It seems fairly simple to me, but maybe I am missing something as I am not an architect nor a professional researcher.
edit on 2-8-2011 by mileysubet because: (no reason given)






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