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Heat index... 127?

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posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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I was checking out the local weather and went to the map to click on the weather station right down the road from my house and what I found was interesting to say the least.



Seeing the high humidity level with such a high temperature 97°F (36°C) seemed strange to me so I pulled up this heat index calculator and typed in the temperature and humidity the result it gave me…. 127°F(53°C). Do not believe me? Try it yourself.

Now I did not believe the calculator so I scrolled back up on that weather page to my base zip code weather and it provided the temperature, humidity, and heat index, with that I used the calculator again to see how they matched up and it was correct. So… for any of you weather experts here can you tell me if there was some error or if the calculator is wrong?

It feels absolutely horrible outside, probably the hottest day this year, but 127 heat index seems a little far-fetched.

UPDATE: With a storm overhead the current weather conditions at the observed site have changed, now the temperature is 77°F(25°C), humidity 88%, and heat index 79°F(26°C).

In just over an hour the heat index dropped nearly 50 degrees which was easily felt, it just fell like a rock.
edit on 7/31/2011 by Misoir because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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I wouldn't make too much out of it, weather people can barely tell me if it's going to rain let alone anything else.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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I was reading this earlier,

thewatchers.adorraeli.com...

Isn't most of the area of extreme drought still flooded?
Keep an eye on the elderly, they are usually casualties of extreme weather like this.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by AussieAmandaC
 


Fortunately my area is only suffering from a ‘moderate drought’ and these types of heat indices are definitely not normal here, even on our hottest days.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 02:04 PM
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The heat index here has been 110 or higher everyday for about the last three weeks. A few times it has been over 120 and you wouldn't believe how many cars have been over heating here.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 02:06 PM
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it's definately the hottest day in our area I can recall this year, and not normal for this time of year, usually feels like this during the mid to late August; and it's been like this since the end of June,with a regular heat index in excess of 100; as I work outside daily, and I was just trimming the bushes at my Grandfathers place in Arlington, it was hotter than usual, and the storm that has now moved in has caused it to feel even muggier than before the storm. It's miserable outside right now, hopefully it will cool down later somewhat as I have 2 more yards to go mow today.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 02:39 PM
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Yes, a heat index of 127 is not impossible.

I'm doing some research out at a local Audubon center and went off to measure heat around ponds that are drying up. At one pond that was mostly baked mudflats with water in the center, I got an air temperature reading of 108 and a humidity reading of 31%, giving the site where I was a heat index of around 117:
www.weatherimages.org...

Lower humidity in desert areas means that you can actually do more in the heat without falling over with exhaustion (the old joke, "yes, but it's a DRY heat"). High rainfall areas (like New Orleans) are miserable when the temperatures hit the 80's -- but low rainfall areas like West Texas are fairly comfortable.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by Misoir
 


We've had heat indexes over 120 quite a few days this month in Virginia. It's called Summer, and this one has been a bit more brutal than your average. That's why I love feeding my friends in the West and Southwest crap, they complain about 100 degrees with no humidity. When I've been out in the dry heat, 100 feels like 75 back here. 100+ degrees with 95%+ humidity is a brutal condition to live and work in.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 03:23 PM
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Heat Index. It's based on humidity and temperature. Evaporation is a cooling reaction, hence why we sweat when we get hot. Our sweat glands excrete the salty liquid and when it is evaporated it cools the skin. However, as moisture in the air rises, which is what humidity measures, sweat has an increasingly harder time to evaporate, rendering sweating a useless physiological response and causing body temperature to rise (increasing the perceived temperature)
edit on 31-7-2011 by DevolutionEvolvd because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 03:30 PM
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This is nothing new - I was talking to my father about this type of thing, and he said when he was a child he remembers the heat getting up to 120; and that was not the heat index, that was the actual temperature.

Earth goes in cycles, and places get hot and cold.

Pay attention to the Atlantic ocean currents. If those start changing drasticly then I'll worry. Untill then you don't have much to worry about - just live life and chill. (pun intended ;-) )



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Yeah last summer was hotter than this summer here in coastal South Carolina. In fact, much hotter. I sent a screen cap of the heat index here one day last summer to my friends back home in Arizona. It was 135. It happens.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 04:14 PM
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I am currently doing lawn care with some old buddies for cemeteries(18)Ugh,. I am outside all day.
Two weeks ago the temperature reached 100*. The index from news sources said apprx 116*. Needless to say it was hot and still is now. I will go by the "normal" temperature. The Index is a bogus media hype number.

Withstanding, I do believe your home,work..etc, can reach the Index without proper ventilation.
the old Steel Mills here reached higher all year round. Your environment plays a major factor... IMO.
Humidity here last week reached 98% with storms approaching. Humidity is what I grew up with here and is always the biggest problem to drain any outdoor workers.

I do not believe it is physically possible to live very long at 127*? !04 to 105 puts most people in the hospital or doctors office at the minimum.
edit on 7/31/2011 by mugger because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by mugger
 


I mow the yards in 105 degree weather. It's fine as long as you're smart about it. Of course, being in Texas, I'm used to it.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 04:46 PM
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uk weather is hot and unusually humid my whole body feels like it might have radiation



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by ateuprto
 



You've just described our wet season in North Qld, which we get every year. It certainly saps your energy, but ever the eternal lizard, I like it!





posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 02:35 PM
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Well, I just used your link to calculate our heat index here in Louisiana right now......

123° !! Un-frikkin-believable. And to think our hottest weather is yet to arrive.....

edit on 8/1/11 by jennybee35 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by AussieAmandaC
reply to post by ateuprto
 



You've just described our wet season in North Qld, which we get every year. It certainly saps your energy, but ever the eternal lizard, I like it!




I like it as well, except when I'm out managing the farm, makes all that labor twice as hard! I do enjoy living in Virginia though, being sub-tropic and temperate we get a nice feel for every climate. Forests might as well be jungles at the height of summer, a few months later the hills can look like Alaska with a foot of snow. Would love to visit your continent at some point in my life.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 07:58 PM
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the heat indexes are scary because it could point to simply more water content in the air, meaning the oceans, lakes, river are simply evaporating at a faster rate than normal due to higher temps which I read about maybe 3 months ago.

this could also mean the warnings about ocean current changes aren't far behind

yay
edit on 1-8-2011 by syrinx high priest because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 07:34 AM
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Originally posted by ateuprto

Originally posted by AussieAmandaC
reply to post by ateuprto
 



You've just described our wet season in North Qld, which we get every year. It certainly saps your energy, but ever the eternal lizard, I like it!




I like it as well, except when I'm out managing the farm, makes all that labor twice as hard! I do enjoy living in Virginia though, being sub-tropic and temperate we get a nice feel for every climate. Forests might as well be jungles at the height of summer, a few months later the hills can look like Alaska with a foot of snow. Would love to visit your continent at some point in my life.



We don't get the snow, although I have experienced the four seasons (and snow which was magical) when we lived in Tasmania, Beautiful place but too cold for me, call me spoilt if you like.
Truly a lizard at heart
I hope you get to come on down and see for yourself too, look us up we've got room to spare
Our town is full of back packers from all over the world in the 'on season'. We live with views to the Whitsundays and open water for thousands of miles, it's truly beautiful.

Once, a long time ago, I thought to travel, but it seems (I feel) I have left it too late....
You couldn't pay me to visit America right now at all, and I mean no disrespect at all.
But with the current political system and your own radiation issues (which people have conveniently forgotten), you couldn't pay me to go there.

Peace always to you and yours
X
Amanda



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 07:48 AM
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reply to post by AussieAmandaC
 


A taxi driver in cairns today could not believe that only 150,000 people live here.

I agreed.




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