It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Juno Set to Launch For Jupiter on Aug. 5

page: 1
6

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 07:56 AM
link   
NASA's Jupiter-Bound Juno Spacecraft Mated to its Rocket.


Specifically, Juno will…
Determine how much water is in Jupiter’s atmosphere, which helps determine which planet formation theory is correct (or if new theories are needed)
Look deep into Jupiter’s atmosphere to measure composition, temperature, cloud motions and other properties
Map Jupiter’s magnetic and gravity fields, revealing the planet’s deep structure
Explore and study Jupiter’s magnetosphere near the planet’s poles, especially the auroras – Jupiter’s northern and southern lights – providing new insights about how the planet’s enormous magnetic force field affects its atmosphere.


Mission Juno

Quick link to the instiments on Juno.


The Juno spacecraft is scheduled to launch aboard an Atlas V-551 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in Aug. 2011, reaching Jupiter in July 2016. The spacecraft will orbit Jupiter 32 times, skimming to within 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) above the planet's cloud tops, for approximately one year.



NASA home, instruments overview.

I also understand that Juno will be equipped with 'Juno Cam' to take close up color images of Jupiter.


Juno's scientific payload includes:
A gravity/radio science system
A six-wavelength microwave radiometer for atmospheric sounding and composition
A vector magnetometer
Plasma and energetic particle detectors
A radio/plasma wave experiment
An ultraviolet imager/spectrometer
An infrared imager/spectrometer
The spacecraft will also carry a color camera to provide the public with the first detailed glimpse of Jupiter's poles.


2015 to 2016 seems to be exciting times with close up views of Pluto and Jupiter heading our way. The continued success of the Cassini mission to Saturn is any indication of what lies ahead our solar system is becoming increasingly clearer.




posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:26 AM
link   
reply to post by Illustronic


Jupiter’s northern and southern lights – providing new insights about how the planet’s enormous magnetic force field affects its atmosphere.

 


The conclusions they reach after digging through this pile of data will sure to be interesting.

What I can't figure out, is why we don't have more spacecraft out there doing this already.




posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:28 AM
link   
Awesome I can watch this launch!

The last delta launch woke me up and scared the crap out of me.


These are best seen at night



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:39 AM
link   
Interesting on the interactive site the true color camera has to piece together strips of images because the spacecraft spins, and quite fast. Also the scientists expect the JunoCam to fail after about 7 orbital passes from the extreme Jovian atmosphere.

I do anticipate the results of data collected to find out about Jupiter's core, if it has a solid core, and how large it may be, or is it a superfluid.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 06:59 AM
link   
reply to post by Illustronic
 




A Hubble Space Telescope view of an electric-blue aurora on Jupiter.


This is an artist's rendition of NASA's Juno spacecraft at Jupiter. (Credit: NASA)


While the spacecraft itself is about the size of a Volkswagen and encased in a protective radiation vault, its three solar panels that will unfurl in space will make the spinning spacecraft more than 65 feet in diameter.


Science Daily Overview










edit on 8/2/2011 by iforget because: (no reason given)

edit on 8/2/2011 by iforget because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics
 
6

log in

join