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How to Predict the Future

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posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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It is argued by historians that Rome fell in the year 476 A.D., when the western half of the empire fell to Germanic hoards. Others argue that Rome did not fall until 1453 A.D. when Constantinople fell.

But what ultimately caused the fall of this great empire after such a glorious reign? There are several factors that play into the fall of Rome, ranging from monetary problems to moral degeneration.

This is the history of the latter part of Roman history, which offers up clues to the ultimate destruction of a once great empire.

Economy

Rome was an extremely prosperous empire, with wealth that was unimaginable. However not everyone shared in the wealth of this great empire.

Towards the late life of Rome unemployment was at an all time high, and cheap slave labor was the norm. The working class starved, while the rich prospered and hoarded their money. This lead to a lack of circulation of currency, which proliferated inflation and further economic woes.

Poor management from the Emperor, Senate, and Roman governors caused Rome to be constantly threatened with bankruptcy – leading to fear mongering amongst those with money, causing them to hoard even more of their resources.

Fast expansion of the Roman borders caused extensive combat with the barbarian peoples that surrounded the Romanian lands. Once assimilated into the empire, these people were unfairly taxed – causing further skirmishes and revolts. Excessive amounts of money was spent on wars and military.

Political Leadership

The leaders of Rome gradually began to care less and less about the people – focusing mainly on their own greed and growth in power.

Often times the governors of Roman territories abused their power, taking more than their fair share and causing hatred amongst the people. This also included sabotage of other territories in effort to gain more authority, power, and wealth.

The Senate, who served as advisors to the emperor, often times disagreed with the emperor on decisions – leading to a gigantic rift between the power-head, and those who speak for the people. A lack of sufficient communication resulted in the gradual breakdown of government order.

Oftentimes, the leaders of Rome were too busy squabbling amongst their selves than focusing on the true issues of the empire.

Morality

Sexual deviancies such as bestiality and pedophilia were the norm for Rome. A breakdown of the family life resulted from such activities. Even festivals were held yearly that promoted orgies, public sexual acts, etc.

Games became increasingly more violent and bloody – resulting in innumerable deaths and casualties, all in the name of entertainment.

Alcohol abuse became more wide spread, causing further breakdown in moral behavior and social structure – much like today’s drug abuse, along with alcohol.

People began to no longer see a clear black and white image of the lives they were living, but skimmed around the gray areas in life. Their apathy grew at the things they viewed in the world around them. They became passive, and less prone to defend the weak or meek. They served their selves first, and put their fellow man second in all things.

Adaption

It has been argued that Rome actually never fell, but simply adapted to the world – taking on the beliefs and structure of the countries they had conquered. It became a very reflection of the places they hated. By the time people had realized what was going on, it was too late; the damage had already been done.


Now

Does this history lesson seem at all familiar to the current system of the United States?

We are in economic woes, due to the filthy rich hoarding their money, a lack of circulation of currency, unemployment, and inflation. People are becoming more poor, as the rich rise to new heights.

Morality has degraded, along with the family life – sexual perverseness is seen on every channel of T.V., and divorce rates have never been higher.

Our leaders squawk like hens in a coop. Bickering with one another of their own selfish desires, but under the guise of serving their people – who are at home suffering.

What happens next?

The only true way to predict the future…. Is to behold the past.

edit on 29-7-2011 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)

edit on Fri Jul 29 2011 by DontTreadOnMe because: STAFF EDIT




posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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I think it's useful to look into the past before you attempt to predict the future but ultimately this becomes futile; our future will become the next generations past etc etc

However, there are two many independent variables that make accurately predicting the future impossible in my opinion, not to mention the large number of nutters knocking about...



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 11:51 AM
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I agree, but really I was trying to be clever while writing the title.



Mainly I am saying we are headed in a smiliar direction in the US as Rome.
edit on 29-7-2011 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by MentorsRiddle
I agree, but really I was trying to be clever while writing the title.



Mainly I am saying we are headed in a smiliar direction in the US as Rome.
edit on 29-7-2011 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)


It's a good analogy to be honest, star and flag from me.

Being from the UK, I can't comment too much on how it "feels" to live in America but I'm pretty sure someone will jump in and offer a more constructive reply to your thread.

But like I said, good analogy - I particularly liked the bit about Games becoming more bloody & violent.



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 11:57 AM
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If you want to know the future, look in the past. History has a way of repeating itself.



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by MentorsRiddle
 


This has all been said before. I would give you a minus star and minus flag if I could for the blatant homophobic statements.



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 12:02 PM
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reply to post by Universer
 


This is a matter of hisorical fact, no homophobia....



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 12:07 PM
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Originally posted by MentorsRiddle
reply to post by Universer
 


This is a matter of hisorical fact, no homophobia....



It is absolutely not a "historical fact" to label homosexuality a perversion.



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by Universer
 


hi universer
im sure the op did not intend homophobia as perversion
i think that he just got overwhelmed whilst writing
i thought it was a good thread
plz go easy on the op
regards
dave



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by davesmart
reply to post by Universer
 


hi universer
im sure the op did not intend homophobia as perversion
i think that he just got overwhelmed whilst writing
i thought it was a good thread
plz go easy on the op
regards
dave


I tend to agree.

While the OP's comment may have offended some, I don't think it was intentional and I certainly wouldn't let it distract quite an interesting read.



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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"Just as in the days of Noah, before the flood........"



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by Universer
 


To answer your question - when writing my post I was referencing a festivle that the Romans had, which involved such acts….

It was not intended to offend anyone, nor cause a debate all in its own. It was simply a statement of historical events, which occurred in our past.



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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Originally posted by Universer
How could it be possibly be unintentional to group homosexuality as one of the "sexual deviancies" along with bestiality and pedophilia?


hi
ok i can see that your a pc
the op could have cut and pasted his writing
and merely missed the certain point
i still stand by the op
and i also apologise on his behalf for his non intentional mistake
regards
a very peed of dave



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 02:09 PM
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To the OP: Again, it is not a statement of historical facts since you injected your opinion that all of those acts constitute deviancy. If it was "unintentional" then change it. I really doubt that will happen, because I am guessing that's what you really believe.

Dave: If by "PC" you mean I don't put up with hate speech and ignorance, then sure. Sorry but an apology from you is meaningless in this context. The poster who posted it as his own words is responsible. If he "pasted it" then that's plagiarism too



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by Universer
 


Universer,


Again, this was simply me regurgitating facts of Rome.

There was no insult, offence, intentional or purposeful degrading of character intended. I was simply stating facts of Rome’s history, which is known to historians around the world.

I am not homophobic, as I have friends and family members who are homosexual – and I love them as much as I love anybody.

It is easy to misconstrue meanings and ideas when reading text over the internet – as you can’t see emotions, facial expressions, or any other communication that does not communicate well over text.

When you read on ancient Rome, which I am very familiar with, one of the points made to the downfall of Rome is a perverse moral behavior – which also encompasses sexual acts. I listed off the main ones that are always written about in historical archives, texts, etc.

Like I said in an earlier post – I am not going to get into a debate about this, as they always run in circles and get nowhere. And its not healthy for either of us to fume about something that was unintentional.

I am sorry if I offended you, it was not intentional – and when I was writing I didn’t even think about what I was typing because I have read it so many times. It just came second nature.

The entire point of the post was to compare modern America to ancient Rome, and how we are close to an end-game based on historical similarities.

It is difficult in today’s society to be 100% politically correct, especially when discussing an era in time when ideas and values touch so many sensitive areas of people’s lives today.

A Mod has already removed the offending statments, and I fully support the Mod for doing so - as my post was not ment to hurt feelings or cause pain.

I hope you will accept my apology for offending you, again it was not intentional, and I hope we can move past this like two adults and enjoy the civility between us like two adults should share.

Kindest Regards,

Matt



edit on 29-7-2011 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-7-2011 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-7-2011 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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To predict the future, all you need to do is make up a bunch of vague and general predictions, based on current observations. Once one of those vague generalizations comes somewhat close to the mark, you can then claim you predicted the future. It's funny how people say they predicted this or that AFTER, the event has happened. Postdiction is not prediction. If you're going to predict something, then your prediction needs to be specific, with dates and times, etc.

I don't believe anyone can predict the future, but we can look to past mistakes, and try not to repeat those mistakes in the present. It's not predicting the future though.
edit on 29-7-2011 by HalLangerhans because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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You know, reading the OP and using it to remind myself of those Spartacus tv shows recently along with Rome that depicted a realistic look at life in those days makes me wish I could've lived through that. Sounded like fun and a totally carefree life without the worries we have in modern times.

Besides, Romans being self serving......isnt it always said to look out for number one? Isn't that the biggest piece of advice usually given when times are bad?



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