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Impact Earth: Calculate the distance and velocity of a meteor.

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posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 05:53 AM
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www.purdue.edu...

I first tried this thing out, put all the coordinates and the all the KM values, and sure enough, guess where it hits,
, right smack dab in my area. How's that for perfect calculation.
You can watch it like your on the rock, too bad it doesn't show the impact. But, does give you like specifications for like crater info, global damages, thermal radiation.

Have fun with it. Pretty cool to play with.
edit on 29-7-2011 by Manhater because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 06:09 AM
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Wow, this things pretty sweet. I ike the detailed info about how impacts can change the length of our days or how big the crater will be. I even oved how it calculated at which altitudes stuff would break up.

Good Find OP. I'm sure the Elenin crowd will love using it to show how much trouble we're in


S&F for you
edit on 29-7-2011 by Thundersmurf because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 06:19 AM
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Why bother to know how fact and how hard the impact will be if it's gonna kill us ? Am I missing something ?



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 06:54 AM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


That's really nice, bookmarked!

It would be more helpful if you could select a particular location, but you can't have everything


Great find, cheers!



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 06:57 AM
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Originally posted by Heartisblack
Why bother to know how fact and how hard the impact will be if it's gonna kill us ? Am I missing something ?

How do you know if it's going to kill us? With this calculator we can know the effects of the collision and maybe the effects are minor! First we need to know Elenin's dimensions wich I beleive we don't.



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 07:02 AM
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Originally posted by Fichorka

Originally posted by Heartisblack
Why bother to know how fact and how hard the impact will be if it's gonna kill us ? Am I missing something ?

How do you know if it's going to kill us? With this calculator we can know the effects of the collision and maybe the effects are minor! First we need to know Elenin's dimensions wich I beleive we don't.


Check out my (very dull) thread...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Impacts are as common as muck, and I doubt very much to worry about on the whole.



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 08:41 AM
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awesome website! and great find!!



posted on Jul, 30 2011 @ 03:45 AM
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Originally posted by Manhater
www.purdue.edu...

I first tried this thing out, put all the coordinates and the all the KM values, and sure enough, guess where it hits,
, right smack dab in my area. How's that for perfect calculation.
You can watch it like your on the rock, too bad it doesn't show the impact. But, does give you like specifications for like crater info, global damages, thermal radiation.


After a couple of attempts at aiming my object at specific locations I realised that the animation is always the same. Which was disappointing. The developers should work on that.

But spent a few hours playing, and we should be most concerned about objects that enter the atmosphere on a low angle. And only really then large objects of a high density. As I recall from the reading that I did for the thread I linked to, the craters in Argentina are the best example of this kind of impact, and they usually produce a 'butterfly-wing' shaped impact site. The low angle entry seems to create fragments, rather than vaporisation and aid in the fireball-i-ness (I am sure there is a better way to say that but it currently eludes me) that creates the impression of a second Sun upon entry. Depending upon the constituents of the object that is. Thermal radiation through direct exposure seems the most significant danger to life. Even an object 2.5 km in size will seemingly have very little impact on weather conditions...and yet, if you could factor in a specific location, it would give better indications of how weather patterns may carry debris, that may then have an effect on global weather or light conditions. Much as we have seen with the Chilean eruption, when a dust cloud is caught on a particular wind, it'll just go round and round on the same latitude until it is, presumably, brought down by rainfall. Similarly, an impact under some conditions may have very localised effects, or it may have global repercussions, depending upon the time of year, and the impact site itself.

It seems to me, that the atmosphere plays a defensive role too. It seems better able to 'cope' or disperse some impacts, not so with others, which fortunately enough, appear to be the least commonly experienced impacts.

Great toy, anyway, should entertain me for many more hours to come...




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