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posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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Its my understanding that the ISS is vacant at this point (correct me if im wrong please) so i just went to check out the live feed camera and its still running.

my question is, how long will the live feed keep running for and is anyone "at the controls" anymore for the camera?

Ive grown quite a fondness for that camera... its the only way we humans can click a button and see our beautiful planet from the outside.

im sure it doesn't cost anything to have that camera operating, but are there plans to close off the live feed?




posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by OUNjahhryn
 


There is still a crew of 6 on-board the ISS. They've been there since April/June, and are planned to stay until around September. The purpose of the Atlantis flight was to stock the ISS with enough supplies to last until the crew can be replaced.



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by OUNjahhryn
 


There is still a crew of 6 on-board the ISS. They've been there since April/June, and are planned to stay until around September. The purpose of the Atlantis flight was to stock the ISS with enough supplies to last until the crew can be replaced.


oh really? I thought the whole program was coming to and end... how do they get home? lol



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by OUNjahhryn
 


Russia has a space program.



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


I thought the russians and nasa flew up together. meh. shows how much I know.... anyways, the camera is still on and thats all that counts.



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by OUNjahhryn
 


They all use each other's programs. The shuttle, for the time it was in use, was the most effective at carrying crew and equipment into space, so it was used the most. Though, I imagine the illusion of the shuttle's monopoly was magnified by the fact that we live in North America and we never hear about the missions of any other nations.

Until NASA can institute the shuttle's successor, the Russian program will be used to carry crew and supplies to and from the ISS. Though, they do want to scrap the ISS in 2020.



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 06:53 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


very true, the shuttle does seem completely outdated. we should take the money they use to research making smart phones and "pads" and make something better than strapping people to a stick of dynamite and lighting the fuse.

our earthbound technologies have soared, while air and space technology is still 40 years behind.



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by OUNjahhryn
 


And there's the irony. The shuttle was in use for 30 years and we call it outdated. The Russians, on the other hand, are still using their 50-year-old Soyuz rockets. We might be to Mars by now if we hadn't wasted our time and money on the shuttle. Some see the ISS as an international achievement. I call it a wasteful distraction.



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


lol wow... didn't know that either, you are now my new source of rocket info. I like the concept of the ISS, but I think we can do a lot better. maybe even a space station that can orbit the moon, now THAT would be awesome.

im not too concerned with getting to mars yet. before we start going to other planets, we should fix out s#$% on this one.



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 07:46 PM
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I can imagine how one can grow fond of the ISS camera, a really great thing I believe a Japanese astronaut started, I had his links before, maybe I put a photo of him in my ATS photo log let me check.

Yes here he is but I left no caption, he shouldn't be hard to find he has several websites with his wonderful photography. It may not be the same guy in control of the (I suppose) video you watch, but wouldn't surprise me. Sorry no bookmarks saved either.



Incidentally, might be little known, but the Space Shuttle was the most efficient vehicle to bring back waste and garbage from the ISS back to earth, (they don't throw it out to burn up in the atmosphere, how green of them). For the time being, the ISS may develop a foul smell.



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic

Incidentally, might be little known, but the Space Shuttle was the most efficient vehicle to bring back waste and garbage from the ISS back to earth, (they don't throw it out to burn up in the atmosphere, how green of them). For the time being, the ISS may develop a foul smell.
the Shuttle did bring back things from the ISS, but very rarely was it waste. Most of the garbage and waste is loaded into the Russian Progress cargo ships, and burned up in the atmosphere:


There are three to four flights of the Progress spacecraft to the ISS per year. Each spacecraft remains docked until shortly before the new one, or a Soyuz (which uses the same docking ports) arrives. Then it is filled with waste, disconnected, deorbited, and destroyed in the atmosphere.




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